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Cell-type specificity of lung cancer associated with low-dose soil heavy metal contamination in Taiwan: an ecological study.

Huang HH, Huang JY, Lung CC, Wu CL, Ho CC, Sun YH, Ko PC, Su SY, Chen SC, Liaw YP - BMC Public Health (2013)

Bottom Line: For males, the trend test for lung SCC incidence caused by exposure to Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, and Zn showed a statistically significant dose-response relationship.However, for lung AC, only Cu and Ni had a significant dose-response relationship.As for females, those achieving a statistically significant dose-response relationship for the trend test were Cr (P = 0.02), Ni (P = 0.02), and Zn (P= 0.02) for lung SCC, and Cu (P < 0.01) and Zn (P = 0.02) for lung AC.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Jen-Ai Hospital, Taichung City 41265, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Numerous studies have examined the association between heavy metal contamination (including arsenic [As], cadmium [Cd], chromium [Cr], copper [Cu], mercury [Hg], nickel [Ni], lead [Pb], and zinc [Zn]) and lung cancer. However, data from previous studies on pathological cell types are limited, particularly regarding exposure to low-dose soil heavy metal contamination. The purpose of this study was to explore the association between soil heavy metal contamination and lung cancer incidence by specific cell type in Taiwan.

Methods: We conducted an ecological study and calculated the annual averages of eight soil heavy metals (i.e., As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn) by using data from the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration from1982 to 1986. The age-standardized incidence rates of lung cancer according to two major pathological types (adenocarcinoma [AC] and squamous cell carcinoma [SCC]) were obtained from the National Cancer Registry Program conducted in Taiwan from 2001 to 2005. A geographical information system was used to plot the maps of soil heavy metal concentration and lung cancer incidence rates. Poisson regression models were used to obtain the adjusted relative ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the lung cancer incidence associated with soil heavy metals.

Results: For males, the trend test for lung SCC incidence caused by exposure to Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, and Zn showed a statistically significant dose-response relationship. However, for lung AC, only Cu and Ni had a significant dose-response relationship. As for females, those achieving a statistically significant dose-response relationship for the trend test were Cr (P = 0.02), Ni (P = 0.02), and Zn (P= 0.02) for lung SCC, and Cu (P < 0.01) and Zn (P = 0.02) for lung AC.

Conclusion: The current study suggests that a dose-response relationship exists between low-dose soil heavy metal concentration and lung cancer occurrence by specific cell-type; however, the relevant mechanism should be explored further.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Geographic patterns by lung cancer ASIR rank during 2001–2005. (a) male lung AC, (b) female lung AC, (c) male lung SCC, (d) female lung SCC. Detailed legend: Geographic patterns by lung cancer ASIR rank of male/female above 30 years old during 2001–2005. (a) male lung AC, (b) female lung AC, (c) male lung SCC, (d) female lung SCC.
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Figure 2: Geographic patterns by lung cancer ASIR rank during 2001–2005. (a) male lung AC, (b) female lung AC, (c) male lung SCC, (d) female lung SCC. Detailed legend: Geographic patterns by lung cancer ASIR rank of male/female above 30 years old during 2001–2005. (a) male lung AC, (b) female lung AC, (c) male lung SCC, (d) female lung SCC.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows the geographical variations of lung AC and lung SCC incidence rates in males and females by rank in 2001–2005. The townships indicated by either red or purple denote that the incidence rates in those townships are significantly higher than the average incidence rate across Taiwan. Geographical variations were found to differ by cell type and gender. Figure 2a shows that male lung AC is clustered in Taipei and the western coastal area. Figure 2b shows that the female lung AC is clustered in Taipei and sporadically in the eastern, central, western and southern townships. Figure 2c shows the male lung SCC is clustered in the northern region, as well as in northeast coastal and central southwestern townships. Figure 2d shows that female lung SCC is clustered in the north east and the eastern coastal area, and sporadically in the southwestern coastal areas.


Cell-type specificity of lung cancer associated with low-dose soil heavy metal contamination in Taiwan: an ecological study.

Huang HH, Huang JY, Lung CC, Wu CL, Ho CC, Sun YH, Ko PC, Su SY, Chen SC, Liaw YP - BMC Public Health (2013)

Geographic patterns by lung cancer ASIR rank during 2001–2005. (a) male lung AC, (b) female lung AC, (c) male lung SCC, (d) female lung SCC. Detailed legend: Geographic patterns by lung cancer ASIR rank of male/female above 30 years old during 2001–2005. (a) male lung AC, (b) female lung AC, (c) male lung SCC, (d) female lung SCC.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3643867&req=5

Figure 2: Geographic patterns by lung cancer ASIR rank during 2001–2005. (a) male lung AC, (b) female lung AC, (c) male lung SCC, (d) female lung SCC. Detailed legend: Geographic patterns by lung cancer ASIR rank of male/female above 30 years old during 2001–2005. (a) male lung AC, (b) female lung AC, (c) male lung SCC, (d) female lung SCC.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows the geographical variations of lung AC and lung SCC incidence rates in males and females by rank in 2001–2005. The townships indicated by either red or purple denote that the incidence rates in those townships are significantly higher than the average incidence rate across Taiwan. Geographical variations were found to differ by cell type and gender. Figure 2a shows that male lung AC is clustered in Taipei and the western coastal area. Figure 2b shows that the female lung AC is clustered in Taipei and sporadically in the eastern, central, western and southern townships. Figure 2c shows the male lung SCC is clustered in the northern region, as well as in northeast coastal and central southwestern townships. Figure 2d shows that female lung SCC is clustered in the north east and the eastern coastal area, and sporadically in the southwestern coastal areas.

Bottom Line: For males, the trend test for lung SCC incidence caused by exposure to Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, and Zn showed a statistically significant dose-response relationship.However, for lung AC, only Cu and Ni had a significant dose-response relationship.As for females, those achieving a statistically significant dose-response relationship for the trend test were Cr (P = 0.02), Ni (P = 0.02), and Zn (P= 0.02) for lung SCC, and Cu (P < 0.01) and Zn (P = 0.02) for lung AC.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Jen-Ai Hospital, Taichung City 41265, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Numerous studies have examined the association between heavy metal contamination (including arsenic [As], cadmium [Cd], chromium [Cr], copper [Cu], mercury [Hg], nickel [Ni], lead [Pb], and zinc [Zn]) and lung cancer. However, data from previous studies on pathological cell types are limited, particularly regarding exposure to low-dose soil heavy metal contamination. The purpose of this study was to explore the association between soil heavy metal contamination and lung cancer incidence by specific cell type in Taiwan.

Methods: We conducted an ecological study and calculated the annual averages of eight soil heavy metals (i.e., As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn) by using data from the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration from1982 to 1986. The age-standardized incidence rates of lung cancer according to two major pathological types (adenocarcinoma [AC] and squamous cell carcinoma [SCC]) were obtained from the National Cancer Registry Program conducted in Taiwan from 2001 to 2005. A geographical information system was used to plot the maps of soil heavy metal concentration and lung cancer incidence rates. Poisson regression models were used to obtain the adjusted relative ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the lung cancer incidence associated with soil heavy metals.

Results: For males, the trend test for lung SCC incidence caused by exposure to Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, and Zn showed a statistically significant dose-response relationship. However, for lung AC, only Cu and Ni had a significant dose-response relationship. As for females, those achieving a statistically significant dose-response relationship for the trend test were Cr (P = 0.02), Ni (P = 0.02), and Zn (P= 0.02) for lung SCC, and Cu (P < 0.01) and Zn (P = 0.02) for lung AC.

Conclusion: The current study suggests that a dose-response relationship exists between low-dose soil heavy metal concentration and lung cancer occurrence by specific cell-type; however, the relevant mechanism should be explored further.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus