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Accessibility and use of essential medicines in health care: Current progress and challenges in India.

Bansal D, Purohit VK - J Pharmacol Pharmacother (2013)

Bottom Line: Appropriate use of essential medicines is one of the most cost-effective components of modern health care.Health expenditure is less in India as compared to developed countries.There is a need to develop strategies to improve affordable access to essential medicines under the current health care reform.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmacy Practice, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Sector-67, Mohali, Punjab, India.

ABSTRACT
Essential Medicine Concept, a major breakthrough in health care, started in 1977 when World Health Organization (WHO) published its first list. Appropriate use of essential medicines is one of the most cost-effective components of modern health care. The selection process has evolved from expert evaluation to evidence-based selection. The first Indian list was published in 1996 and the recent revision with 348 medicines was published in 2011 after 8 years. Health expenditure is less in India as compared to developed countries. India faces a major challenge in providing access to medicines for its 1.2 billion people by focusing on providing essential medicines. In the future, countries will face challenges in selecting high-cost medicines for oncology, orphan diseases and other conditions. There is a need to develop strategies to improve affordable access to essential medicines under the current health care reform.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Trends in WHO [10] and Indian EML [1112] *Including core and complementary medicines †WHO incorporated EML for Children (EMLc) from 2007 and the latest 3rd (2011) revision consists of 269 medicines ‡No complementary medicines are listed in the current EML **WHO has introduced its first EML in 1977 but India has introduced its NEML in 1996 with two revisions in 2003 and 2011
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Figure 1: Trends in WHO [10] and Indian EML [1112] *Including core and complementary medicines †WHO incorporated EML for Children (EMLc) from 2007 and the latest 3rd (2011) revision consists of 269 medicines ‡No complementary medicines are listed in the current EML **WHO has introduced its first EML in 1977 but India has introduced its NEML in 1996 with two revisions in 2003 and 2011

Mentions: The WHO model list focuses on medicines that address conditions that create the greatest public health threat with an emphasis on common infections and chronic diseases.[8] The model EML serves as a guide to develop country's own national EML.[9] Since its inception, the list has been updated every two years and the current list is the 17th (2011) WHO EML [Figure 1]. The list consists of a core list (efficacious, safe, and cost-effective medicines for priority conditions) and a complementary list (priority diseases, for which specialized diagnostic or monitoring facilities, and/or specialist medical care, and/or specialist training is needed).[13] The current list contains 445 medicines and 358 molecules excluding duplicates (347 molecules in core list and 98 in complementary list). It is composed of 871 formulations and dosage forms. WHO has also incorporated EML for children from 2007 and the latest 3rd (2011) revision consists of 269 drugs.[14]


Accessibility and use of essential medicines in health care: Current progress and challenges in India.

Bansal D, Purohit VK - J Pharmacol Pharmacother (2013)

Trends in WHO [10] and Indian EML [1112] *Including core and complementary medicines †WHO incorporated EML for Children (EMLc) from 2007 and the latest 3rd (2011) revision consists of 269 medicines ‡No complementary medicines are listed in the current EML **WHO has introduced its first EML in 1977 but India has introduced its NEML in 1996 with two revisions in 2003 and 2011
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3643337&req=5

Figure 1: Trends in WHO [10] and Indian EML [1112] *Including core and complementary medicines †WHO incorporated EML for Children (EMLc) from 2007 and the latest 3rd (2011) revision consists of 269 medicines ‡No complementary medicines are listed in the current EML **WHO has introduced its first EML in 1977 but India has introduced its NEML in 1996 with two revisions in 2003 and 2011
Mentions: The WHO model list focuses on medicines that address conditions that create the greatest public health threat with an emphasis on common infections and chronic diseases.[8] The model EML serves as a guide to develop country's own national EML.[9] Since its inception, the list has been updated every two years and the current list is the 17th (2011) WHO EML [Figure 1]. The list consists of a core list (efficacious, safe, and cost-effective medicines for priority conditions) and a complementary list (priority diseases, for which specialized diagnostic or monitoring facilities, and/or specialist medical care, and/or specialist training is needed).[13] The current list contains 445 medicines and 358 molecules excluding duplicates (347 molecules in core list and 98 in complementary list). It is composed of 871 formulations and dosage forms. WHO has also incorporated EML for children from 2007 and the latest 3rd (2011) revision consists of 269 drugs.[14]

Bottom Line: Appropriate use of essential medicines is one of the most cost-effective components of modern health care.Health expenditure is less in India as compared to developed countries.There is a need to develop strategies to improve affordable access to essential medicines under the current health care reform.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmacy Practice, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Sector-67, Mohali, Punjab, India.

ABSTRACT
Essential Medicine Concept, a major breakthrough in health care, started in 1977 when World Health Organization (WHO) published its first list. Appropriate use of essential medicines is one of the most cost-effective components of modern health care. The selection process has evolved from expert evaluation to evidence-based selection. The first Indian list was published in 1996 and the recent revision with 348 medicines was published in 2011 after 8 years. Health expenditure is less in India as compared to developed countries. India faces a major challenge in providing access to medicines for its 1.2 billion people by focusing on providing essential medicines. In the future, countries will face challenges in selecting high-cost medicines for oncology, orphan diseases and other conditions. There is a need to develop strategies to improve affordable access to essential medicines under the current health care reform.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus