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Women's awareness and periconceptional use of folic acid: data from a large European survey.

Bitzer J, von Stenglin A, Bannemerschult R - Int J Womens Health (2013)

Bottom Line: Of the respondents, 58% had at least one biological child, and of these 38% reported that their first pregnancy was not planned.Overall, 70% reported that they had heard of folic acid and 40% stated that they knew the benefits of folic acid.A large proportion of European women of child-bearing age in this survey were unaware that periconceptional folic acid supplementation reduces the risk of birth defects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Women's Hospital of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the awareness and use of folic acid in European women of child-bearing age, particularly in the setting of pregnancy and pregnancy planning.

Methods: Between November 2009 and December 2009, women aged 15-49 years old from 18 European countries completed a 30-minute structured questionnaire either online or via face-to-face interviews. To achieve nationally representative samples for each country quotas were set for age, education, income, and regional distribution.

Results: A total of 22,925 women participated in the survey. Of the respondents, 58% had at least one biological child, and of these 38% reported that their first pregnancy was not planned. Nearly 60% of women who planned their pregnancy indicated that they had stopped using their method of contraception without first consulting a doctor or another health care professional. Overall, 70% reported that they had heard of folic acid and 40% stated that they knew the benefits of folic acid. However, when prompted to indicate which diseases and/or birth defects folic acid can protect against, only 17% knew that folic acid can reduce the risk of neural tube defects/spina bifida.

Conclusions: A large proportion of European women of child-bearing age in this survey were unaware that periconceptional folic acid supplementation reduces the risk of birth defects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Among European women with biological children and who planned their first pregnancy, responses to the question, “When you were making plans to become pregnant with your first child, which of the following did you do?”.Notes: European aggregated data are based on weighted samples (unweighted n number shown in brackets). Data for the individual countries are based on unweighted samples.Abbreviations: EU, total Europe; AT, Austria; CZ, Czech Republic; DK, Denmark; FR, France; DE, Germany; GR, Greece; IT, Italy; NL, Netherlands; NO, Norway; PL, Poland; PT, Portugal; RU, Russia; ES, Spain; SE, Sweden; CH, Switzerland; TR, Turkey; UA, Ukraine; UK, United Kingdom; n, number.
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f2-ijwh-5-201: Among European women with biological children and who planned their first pregnancy, responses to the question, “When you were making plans to become pregnant with your first child, which of the following did you do?”.Notes: European aggregated data are based on weighted samples (unweighted n number shown in brackets). Data for the individual countries are based on unweighted samples.Abbreviations: EU, total Europe; AT, Austria; CZ, Czech Republic; DK, Denmark; FR, France; DE, Germany; GR, Greece; IT, Italy; NL, Netherlands; NO, Norway; PL, Poland; PT, Portugal; RU, Russia; ES, Spain; SE, Sweden; CH, Switzerland; TR, Turkey; UA, Ukraine; UK, United Kingdom; n, number.

Mentions: Of the women who did plan their first pregnancy, just under one-fifth (18%) reported that they had consulted their doctor or another health care professional prior to stopping their birth control. More than half (56%) of the women who planned their first pregnancy reported that they stopped using their method of contraception without first consulting their doctor or another health care professional (Figure 2). The majority of the remaining women either had not used a contraceptive before (19%), or did not recall their behavior at that time point (4%). Frequencies varied considerably between the countries. The proportion of women who reported not consulting their doctor or another health care professional before stopping birth control in order to become pregnant was highest in Sweden (85%) and The Netherlands (81%). In contrast, only around one-third of women in Turkey (32%) and Poland (33%) did not consult their doctor under such circumstances.


Women's awareness and periconceptional use of folic acid: data from a large European survey.

Bitzer J, von Stenglin A, Bannemerschult R - Int J Womens Health (2013)

Among European women with biological children and who planned their first pregnancy, responses to the question, “When you were making plans to become pregnant with your first child, which of the following did you do?”.Notes: European aggregated data are based on weighted samples (unweighted n number shown in brackets). Data for the individual countries are based on unweighted samples.Abbreviations: EU, total Europe; AT, Austria; CZ, Czech Republic; DK, Denmark; FR, France; DE, Germany; GR, Greece; IT, Italy; NL, Netherlands; NO, Norway; PL, Poland; PT, Portugal; RU, Russia; ES, Spain; SE, Sweden; CH, Switzerland; TR, Turkey; UA, Ukraine; UK, United Kingdom; n, number.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3643291&req=5

f2-ijwh-5-201: Among European women with biological children and who planned their first pregnancy, responses to the question, “When you were making plans to become pregnant with your first child, which of the following did you do?”.Notes: European aggregated data are based on weighted samples (unweighted n number shown in brackets). Data for the individual countries are based on unweighted samples.Abbreviations: EU, total Europe; AT, Austria; CZ, Czech Republic; DK, Denmark; FR, France; DE, Germany; GR, Greece; IT, Italy; NL, Netherlands; NO, Norway; PL, Poland; PT, Portugal; RU, Russia; ES, Spain; SE, Sweden; CH, Switzerland; TR, Turkey; UA, Ukraine; UK, United Kingdom; n, number.
Mentions: Of the women who did plan their first pregnancy, just under one-fifth (18%) reported that they had consulted their doctor or another health care professional prior to stopping their birth control. More than half (56%) of the women who planned their first pregnancy reported that they stopped using their method of contraception without first consulting their doctor or another health care professional (Figure 2). The majority of the remaining women either had not used a contraceptive before (19%), or did not recall their behavior at that time point (4%). Frequencies varied considerably between the countries. The proportion of women who reported not consulting their doctor or another health care professional before stopping birth control in order to become pregnant was highest in Sweden (85%) and The Netherlands (81%). In contrast, only around one-third of women in Turkey (32%) and Poland (33%) did not consult their doctor under such circumstances.

Bottom Line: Of the respondents, 58% had at least one biological child, and of these 38% reported that their first pregnancy was not planned.Overall, 70% reported that they had heard of folic acid and 40% stated that they knew the benefits of folic acid.A large proportion of European women of child-bearing age in this survey were unaware that periconceptional folic acid supplementation reduces the risk of birth defects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Women's Hospital of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the awareness and use of folic acid in European women of child-bearing age, particularly in the setting of pregnancy and pregnancy planning.

Methods: Between November 2009 and December 2009, women aged 15-49 years old from 18 European countries completed a 30-minute structured questionnaire either online or via face-to-face interviews. To achieve nationally representative samples for each country quotas were set for age, education, income, and regional distribution.

Results: A total of 22,925 women participated in the survey. Of the respondents, 58% had at least one biological child, and of these 38% reported that their first pregnancy was not planned. Nearly 60% of women who planned their pregnancy indicated that they had stopped using their method of contraception without first consulting a doctor or another health care professional. Overall, 70% reported that they had heard of folic acid and 40% stated that they knew the benefits of folic acid. However, when prompted to indicate which diseases and/or birth defects folic acid can protect against, only 17% knew that folic acid can reduce the risk of neural tube defects/spina bifida.

Conclusions: A large proportion of European women of child-bearing age in this survey were unaware that periconceptional folic acid supplementation reduces the risk of birth defects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus