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Development and implementation of an online hybrid model for teaching evidence-based practice to health professions: processes and outcomes from an Australian experience.

Kumar S, Perraton L, Machotka Z - Adv Med Educ Pract (2010)

Bottom Line: In 2006, the overall student satisfaction rating was 62.07, in 2007 it was 65.8, and in 2008 it was 55.7.Qualitative findings also supported these quantitative findings, indicating improvements in the structure and process of the new course.The outcomes from the evaluation of the remodeled course provide evidence of a consistent quality learning experience for students, and support the concept of using research evidence to guide the development of teaching and learning practices in the training of health professionals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia.

ABSTRACT
Evidence-based practice is now considered to be a vital element of health care service delivery. The call to use evidence to inform other areas, such as teaching and learning, is growing. This paper reports on the processes used to integrate best evidence into teaching practices within an undergraduate health science program. An existing course within this program at an Australian tertiary institution was remodeled by a newly appointed course coordinator in response to critical feedback from student cohorts. A systematic, iterative, five-step approach was used in the development of the new course. The process of development was influenced by current research evidence, an audit of the existing course, and critical feedback from students. The new course was evaluated using quantitative and qualitative research methods for five study periods. In 2005, prior to implementing the changes, the overall student satisfaction rating for the course was zero (representing the lowest possible score). In 2006, the overall student satisfaction rating was 62.07, in 2007 it was 65.8, and in 2008 it was 55.7. Qualitative findings also supported these quantitative findings, indicating improvements in the structure and process of the new course. The outcomes from the evaluation of the remodeled course provide evidence of a consistent quality learning experience for students, and support the concept of using research evidence to guide the development of teaching and learning practices in the training of health professionals.

No MeSH data available.


UniSA hybrid online model (adapted from Martyn 200310).
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f2-amep-1-001: UniSA hybrid online model (adapted from Martyn 200310).

Mentions: Key findings from Step One and Step Two indicated the need for a model of online teaching and learning to suit the needs of all relevant stakeholders. From the students’ perspectives, although the course was delivered online, it was important that the educator still had a visible presence and was readily accessible. Investigation of other courses (Step Two) revealed that a mixed model of education provision was often used, whereby some components of courses involved face-to-face contact between the educator and the students, and some were conducted using online learning resources. Recognizing these requirements and other local drivers, a review of the literature on best practice for online teaching and learning was conducted, and a large volume of literature was subsequently identified and retrieved. Evaluation of relevant literature highlighted the existence of a hybrid online model.10,15–20 This model of online education has been termed “blended learning”. According to Martyn, blended learning provides opportunities to use multiple technology modes, combines pedagogic approaches, and may include blending of educational technologies with face-to-face student and educator interaction.10 Based on the broad principles of this hybrid/blended online model, and taking into account local context and drivers, such as the information technology tools available, and educational and administrative requirements, a model specific to this course was developed. This model is displayed in Figure 2.


Development and implementation of an online hybrid model for teaching evidence-based practice to health professions: processes and outcomes from an Australian experience.

Kumar S, Perraton L, Machotka Z - Adv Med Educ Pract (2010)

UniSA hybrid online model (adapted from Martyn 200310).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3643125&req=5

f2-amep-1-001: UniSA hybrid online model (adapted from Martyn 200310).
Mentions: Key findings from Step One and Step Two indicated the need for a model of online teaching and learning to suit the needs of all relevant stakeholders. From the students’ perspectives, although the course was delivered online, it was important that the educator still had a visible presence and was readily accessible. Investigation of other courses (Step Two) revealed that a mixed model of education provision was often used, whereby some components of courses involved face-to-face contact between the educator and the students, and some were conducted using online learning resources. Recognizing these requirements and other local drivers, a review of the literature on best practice for online teaching and learning was conducted, and a large volume of literature was subsequently identified and retrieved. Evaluation of relevant literature highlighted the existence of a hybrid online model.10,15–20 This model of online education has been termed “blended learning”. According to Martyn, blended learning provides opportunities to use multiple technology modes, combines pedagogic approaches, and may include blending of educational technologies with face-to-face student and educator interaction.10 Based on the broad principles of this hybrid/blended online model, and taking into account local context and drivers, such as the information technology tools available, and educational and administrative requirements, a model specific to this course was developed. This model is displayed in Figure 2.

Bottom Line: In 2006, the overall student satisfaction rating was 62.07, in 2007 it was 65.8, and in 2008 it was 55.7.Qualitative findings also supported these quantitative findings, indicating improvements in the structure and process of the new course.The outcomes from the evaluation of the remodeled course provide evidence of a consistent quality learning experience for students, and support the concept of using research evidence to guide the development of teaching and learning practices in the training of health professionals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia.

ABSTRACT
Evidence-based practice is now considered to be a vital element of health care service delivery. The call to use evidence to inform other areas, such as teaching and learning, is growing. This paper reports on the processes used to integrate best evidence into teaching practices within an undergraduate health science program. An existing course within this program at an Australian tertiary institution was remodeled by a newly appointed course coordinator in response to critical feedback from student cohorts. A systematic, iterative, five-step approach was used in the development of the new course. The process of development was influenced by current research evidence, an audit of the existing course, and critical feedback from students. The new course was evaluated using quantitative and qualitative research methods for five study periods. In 2005, prior to implementing the changes, the overall student satisfaction rating for the course was zero (representing the lowest possible score). In 2006, the overall student satisfaction rating was 62.07, in 2007 it was 65.8, and in 2008 it was 55.7. Qualitative findings also supported these quantitative findings, indicating improvements in the structure and process of the new course. The outcomes from the evaluation of the remodeled course provide evidence of a consistent quality learning experience for students, and support the concept of using research evidence to guide the development of teaching and learning practices in the training of health professionals.

No MeSH data available.