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Routine vaccination coverage in low- and middle-income countries: further arguments for accelerating support to child vaccination services.

Tao W, Petzold M, Forsberg BC - Glob Health Action (2013)

Bottom Line: Currently, this effective public health intervention is still not accessible to all.Non-significant differences in coverage were found between DHS data and WHO and UNICEF estimates.The coverage of routine vaccinations in low- and middle-income countries may be lower than that previously reported.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Systems and Policy Research Group, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background and objective: The Expanded Programme on Immunization was introduced by the World Health Organization (WHO) in all countries during the 1970s. Currently, this effective public health intervention is still not accessible to all. This study evaluates the change in routine vaccination coverage over time based on survey data and compares it to estimations by the WHO and United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF).

Design: Data of vaccination coverage of children less than 5 years of age was extracted from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) conducted in 71 low- and middle-income countries during 1986-2009. Overall trends for vaccination coverage of tuberculosis, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and measles were analysed and compared to WHO and UNICEF estimates.

Results: From 1986 to 2009, the annual average increase in vaccination coverage of the studied diseases ranged between 1.53 and 1.96% units according to DHS data. Vaccination coverage of diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and measles was all under 80% in 2009. Non-significant differences in coverage were found between DHS data and WHO and UNICEF estimates.

Conclusions: The coverage of routine vaccinations in low- and middle-income countries may be lower than that previously reported. Hence, it is important to maintain and increase current vaccination levels.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Estimated mean trend in BCG coverage of children aged 12–23 months. Data is obtained from 175 DHS surveys from 71 low- and middle-income countries and compared with WHO-estimated coverage for the corresponding countries from 1986 to 2009.
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Figure 0001: Estimated mean trend in BCG coverage of children aged 12–23 months. Data is obtained from 175 DHS surveys from 71 low- and middle-income countries and compared with WHO-estimated coverage for the corresponding countries from 1986 to 2009.

Mentions: The overall trend over time for tuberculosis vaccination (BCG) according to DHS data was estimated as an annual increase of 1.96% units (p<0.001) in the surveyed countries from 1986 to 2009 (Fig. 1). In 2009, the DHS trend line suggests 97% coverage and WHO and UNICEF suggests 94% coverage. The difference between these two trends was statistically significant (p=0.001).


Routine vaccination coverage in low- and middle-income countries: further arguments for accelerating support to child vaccination services.

Tao W, Petzold M, Forsberg BC - Glob Health Action (2013)

Estimated mean trend in BCG coverage of children aged 12–23 months. Data is obtained from 175 DHS surveys from 71 low- and middle-income countries and compared with WHO-estimated coverage for the corresponding countries from 1986 to 2009.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3643076&req=5

Figure 0001: Estimated mean trend in BCG coverage of children aged 12–23 months. Data is obtained from 175 DHS surveys from 71 low- and middle-income countries and compared with WHO-estimated coverage for the corresponding countries from 1986 to 2009.
Mentions: The overall trend over time for tuberculosis vaccination (BCG) according to DHS data was estimated as an annual increase of 1.96% units (p<0.001) in the surveyed countries from 1986 to 2009 (Fig. 1). In 2009, the DHS trend line suggests 97% coverage and WHO and UNICEF suggests 94% coverage. The difference between these two trends was statistically significant (p=0.001).

Bottom Line: Currently, this effective public health intervention is still not accessible to all.Non-significant differences in coverage were found between DHS data and WHO and UNICEF estimates.The coverage of routine vaccinations in low- and middle-income countries may be lower than that previously reported.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Systems and Policy Research Group, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background and objective: The Expanded Programme on Immunization was introduced by the World Health Organization (WHO) in all countries during the 1970s. Currently, this effective public health intervention is still not accessible to all. This study evaluates the change in routine vaccination coverage over time based on survey data and compares it to estimations by the WHO and United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF).

Design: Data of vaccination coverage of children less than 5 years of age was extracted from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) conducted in 71 low- and middle-income countries during 1986-2009. Overall trends for vaccination coverage of tuberculosis, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and measles were analysed and compared to WHO and UNICEF estimates.

Results: From 1986 to 2009, the annual average increase in vaccination coverage of the studied diseases ranged between 1.53 and 1.96% units according to DHS data. Vaccination coverage of diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and measles was all under 80% in 2009. Non-significant differences in coverage were found between DHS data and WHO and UNICEF estimates.

Conclusions: The coverage of routine vaccinations in low- and middle-income countries may be lower than that previously reported. Hence, it is important to maintain and increase current vaccination levels.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus