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Overview of atopic dermatitis.

Kim KH - Asia Pac Allergy (2013)

Bottom Line: AD has many different clinical features.AD can be controlled effectively with topical and/or systemic treatments and fortunately spontaneously disappears with age.However, in some cases very resistant to conventional therapies, additional treatments such as immunosuppressive agents are needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a very common chronic disease that reportedly affects 10%-20% of the general population. The prevalence of AD appears to be steadily increasing, at least in developing countries. Two pathogenetic mechanisms have been mentioned. Traditionally immunological aberrations are thought to be a primary event in the initial development of AD ("inside-to-outside hypothesis"). Another hypothesis assumes that there is an intrinsic defect in epidermal barrier. Due to this barrier defect, allergens or irritants can easily penetrate the epidermal barrier, and induce immunologic reaction secondarily ("outside-to-inside hypothesis"). These days the epidermal barrier defect seems to gain more support as a primary event than immunological aberrations in the early changes of AD since the filaggrin mutation was reported in AD patients. Clinically AD initially affects face, and with age, flexural areas are typically involved. AD has many different clinical features. Diagnostic criteria for AD in each country may be a little different, although based on the criteria proposed by Hanifin and Rajka. AD can be controlled effectively with topical and/or systemic treatments and fortunately spontaneously disappears with age. However, in some cases very resistant to conventional therapies, additional treatments such as immunosuppressive agents are needed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Periauricular eczematization.
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Figure 4: Periauricular eczematization.

Mentions: Sometimes it is difficult to make the final diagnosis of AD when patients show atypical clinical features. That is why we need diagnostic criteria for AD. Recently Korean diagnostic criteria for AD were reported [27] (Table 1) and are now under revision for more accurate diagnosis. These should be easy and suitable for field study in Korea. In fact there are many additional or minor clinical features such as scalp scaling, pityriasis alba, periauricular eczematization usually in the form of infraauricular and/or postauricular fissure, anterior neck folds, nipple eczema, palmar hyperlinearity, infragluteal eczema, and nonspecific hand-foot eczema. These features may be different according to ethnic background and age [28-31]. Periauricular eczematization (Fig. 4) is observed in around 60% of the Korean pediatric patients [32].


Overview of atopic dermatitis.

Kim KH - Asia Pac Allergy (2013)

Periauricular eczematization.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3643056&req=5

Figure 4: Periauricular eczematization.
Mentions: Sometimes it is difficult to make the final diagnosis of AD when patients show atypical clinical features. That is why we need diagnostic criteria for AD. Recently Korean diagnostic criteria for AD were reported [27] (Table 1) and are now under revision for more accurate diagnosis. These should be easy and suitable for field study in Korea. In fact there are many additional or minor clinical features such as scalp scaling, pityriasis alba, periauricular eczematization usually in the form of infraauricular and/or postauricular fissure, anterior neck folds, nipple eczema, palmar hyperlinearity, infragluteal eczema, and nonspecific hand-foot eczema. These features may be different according to ethnic background and age [28-31]. Periauricular eczematization (Fig. 4) is observed in around 60% of the Korean pediatric patients [32].

Bottom Line: AD has many different clinical features.AD can be controlled effectively with topical and/or systemic treatments and fortunately spontaneously disappears with age.However, in some cases very resistant to conventional therapies, additional treatments such as immunosuppressive agents are needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a very common chronic disease that reportedly affects 10%-20% of the general population. The prevalence of AD appears to be steadily increasing, at least in developing countries. Two pathogenetic mechanisms have been mentioned. Traditionally immunological aberrations are thought to be a primary event in the initial development of AD ("inside-to-outside hypothesis"). Another hypothesis assumes that there is an intrinsic defect in epidermal barrier. Due to this barrier defect, allergens or irritants can easily penetrate the epidermal barrier, and induce immunologic reaction secondarily ("outside-to-inside hypothesis"). These days the epidermal barrier defect seems to gain more support as a primary event than immunological aberrations in the early changes of AD since the filaggrin mutation was reported in AD patients. Clinically AD initially affects face, and with age, flexural areas are typically involved. AD has many different clinical features. Diagnostic criteria for AD in each country may be a little different, although based on the criteria proposed by Hanifin and Rajka. AD can be controlled effectively with topical and/or systemic treatments and fortunately spontaneously disappears with age. However, in some cases very resistant to conventional therapies, additional treatments such as immunosuppressive agents are needed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus