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Understanding public drug procurement in India: a comparative qualitative study of five Indian states.

Singh PV, Tatambhotla A, Kalvakuntla R, Chokshi M - BMJ Open (2013)

Bottom Line: A total of 30 actors were interviewed in all five states.The analysis indicated that autonomous procurement organisations were more efficient in relation to payments to suppliers, had relatively lower drug procurement prices and managed their inventory more scientifically.The authors highlight critical success factors that significantly influence the outcome of any procurement model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ACCESS Health International, Centre for Emerging Markets Solutions, Indian School of Business, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To perform an initial qualitative comparison of the different procurement models in India to frame questions for future research in this area; to capture the finer differences between the state models through 53 process and price parameters to determine their functional efficiencies.

Design: Qualitative analysis is performed for the study. Five states: Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Odisha, Punjab and Maharashtra were chosen to ensure heterogeneity in a number of factors such as procurement type (centralised, decentralised or mixed); autonomy of the procurement organisation; state of public health infrastructure; geography and availability of data through Right to Information Act (RTI). Data on procurement processes were collected through key informant analysis by way of semistructured interviews with leadership teams of procuring organisations. These process data were validated through interviews with field staff (stakeholders of district hospitals, taluk hospitals, community health centres and primary health centres) in each state. A total of 30 actors were interviewed in all five states. The data collected are analysed against 52 process and price parameters to determine the functional efficiency of the model.

Results: The analysis indicated that autonomous procurement organisations were more efficient in relation to payments to suppliers, had relatively lower drug procurement prices and managed their inventory more scientifically.

Conclusions: The authors highlight critical success factors that significantly influence the outcome of any procurement model. In a way, this study raises more questions and seeks the need for further research in this arena to aid policy makers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Combined expectation mapping of beneficiaries of a public procurement system.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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BMJOPEN2012001987F4: Combined expectation mapping of beneficiaries of a public procurement system.

Mentions: Broadly speaking, the two main beneficiaries in this context are the government and the patient. On the one hand, rationality dictates that any government in a resource-constrained setting would expect that an effective procurement system would ensure availability of quality medicines while optimising the finances to ensure the best outcomes. It is also in the interest of the government to run this system transparently to promote competition and thus efficiency. On the other hand, a patient expects that good quality medicines are available at all times, free of cost (see figure 4 for an expectation map of both beneficiaries). Leadership, technical capability and information technology overarching the expectations in the exhibit below are the pre-requisites for running a system efficiently. The capability of each state's procurement system to enhance IT usage and administrative capabilities driven by a strong leader is prerequisite.


Understanding public drug procurement in India: a comparative qualitative study of five Indian states.

Singh PV, Tatambhotla A, Kalvakuntla R, Chokshi M - BMJ Open (2013)

Combined expectation mapping of beneficiaries of a public procurement system.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3585974&req=5

BMJOPEN2012001987F4: Combined expectation mapping of beneficiaries of a public procurement system.
Mentions: Broadly speaking, the two main beneficiaries in this context are the government and the patient. On the one hand, rationality dictates that any government in a resource-constrained setting would expect that an effective procurement system would ensure availability of quality medicines while optimising the finances to ensure the best outcomes. It is also in the interest of the government to run this system transparently to promote competition and thus efficiency. On the other hand, a patient expects that good quality medicines are available at all times, free of cost (see figure 4 for an expectation map of both beneficiaries). Leadership, technical capability and information technology overarching the expectations in the exhibit below are the pre-requisites for running a system efficiently. The capability of each state's procurement system to enhance IT usage and administrative capabilities driven by a strong leader is prerequisite.

Bottom Line: A total of 30 actors were interviewed in all five states.The analysis indicated that autonomous procurement organisations were more efficient in relation to payments to suppliers, had relatively lower drug procurement prices and managed their inventory more scientifically.The authors highlight critical success factors that significantly influence the outcome of any procurement model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ACCESS Health International, Centre for Emerging Markets Solutions, Indian School of Business, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To perform an initial qualitative comparison of the different procurement models in India to frame questions for future research in this area; to capture the finer differences between the state models through 53 process and price parameters to determine their functional efficiencies.

Design: Qualitative analysis is performed for the study. Five states: Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Odisha, Punjab and Maharashtra were chosen to ensure heterogeneity in a number of factors such as procurement type (centralised, decentralised or mixed); autonomy of the procurement organisation; state of public health infrastructure; geography and availability of data through Right to Information Act (RTI). Data on procurement processes were collected through key informant analysis by way of semistructured interviews with leadership teams of procuring organisations. These process data were validated through interviews with field staff (stakeholders of district hospitals, taluk hospitals, community health centres and primary health centres) in each state. A total of 30 actors were interviewed in all five states. The data collected are analysed against 52 process and price parameters to determine the functional efficiency of the model.

Results: The analysis indicated that autonomous procurement organisations were more efficient in relation to payments to suppliers, had relatively lower drug procurement prices and managed their inventory more scientifically.

Conclusions: The authors highlight critical success factors that significantly influence the outcome of any procurement model. In a way, this study raises more questions and seeks the need for further research in this arena to aid policy makers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus