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Impact of respiratory syncytial virus: the nurse's perspective.

Bracht M, Basevitz D, Cranis M, Paulley R - Drugs R D (2011)

Bottom Line: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a highly contagious virus, and is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and toddlers worldwide.RSV prophylaxis (RSVP) with palivizumab has been shown to improve clinical outcome in infants who are considered high risk compared with those who have not received RSVP.The failure of healthcare staff and primary caregivers to protect children against an RSV infection can have lasting detrimental effects on the health and lives of affected children and their families.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. mbracht@mtsinai.on.ca

ABSTRACT
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a highly contagious virus, and is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and toddlers worldwide. RSV infection poses serious health risks to young children during the first 2 years of life. Several infant populations have been classified as high risk, and additional risk factors are known to increase the likelihood of severe RSV infection. Treatment for active RSV infection is limited to the symptoms of infection rather than the underlying cause; therefore, it is critical to reduce the transmission of RSV. As nurses, we highlight the importance of educating healthcare professionals, both in the hospital and community settings, as well as parents and other caregivers about the risks and outcomes associated with RSV infection, and necessary measures to decrease the risk of infection. We also highlight the importance of the successful identification of those children who are at high risk of RSV infection. RSV prophylaxis (RSVP) with palivizumab has been shown to improve clinical outcome in infants who are considered high risk compared with those who have not received RSVP. The failure of healthcare staff and primary caregivers to protect children against an RSV infection can have lasting detrimental effects on the health and lives of affected children and their families.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Factors that contribute to increased risk of severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infectiona
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Tab1: Factors that contribute to increased risk of severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infectiona

Mentions: There are additional risk factors that increase the susceptibility of newborns to RSV infection (see table I). In northern latitudes, the ‘RSV season’ typically runs from early winter (November/December) through late spring (April/May). It is during this time that the rate of hospitalization due to RSV infection is highest,[14] making this a particularly important time for caregiver vigilance and appropriate prevention measures. However, it has been demonstrated that RSV infections can occur at any time of year,[21,45] highlighting the importance of year-round education and infection reduction measures. Other risk factors that may increase an infant’s susceptibility to RSV were reviewed by Simoes,[37] and include attendance in daycare and having pre-school or school-aged sibling(s). Also, higher numbers of people sleeping in the same room has been shown to increase the risk of hospitalization due to respiratory tract infection.[38,40] It is generally thought that breastfeeding confers some protection against RSV-associated lower respiratory tract infection,[37] such that children who are not breastfed are at increased risk. The air quality within the home is of importance as well; exposure to tobacco smoke may cause increased respiratory tract reactivity in susceptible infants, leading to exacerbation of respiratory disease.[41,42]


Impact of respiratory syncytial virus: the nurse's perspective.

Bracht M, Basevitz D, Cranis M, Paulley R - Drugs R D (2011)

Factors that contribute to increased risk of severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infectiona
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3585956&req=5

Tab1: Factors that contribute to increased risk of severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infectiona
Mentions: There are additional risk factors that increase the susceptibility of newborns to RSV infection (see table I). In northern latitudes, the ‘RSV season’ typically runs from early winter (November/December) through late spring (April/May). It is during this time that the rate of hospitalization due to RSV infection is highest,[14] making this a particularly important time for caregiver vigilance and appropriate prevention measures. However, it has been demonstrated that RSV infections can occur at any time of year,[21,45] highlighting the importance of year-round education and infection reduction measures. Other risk factors that may increase an infant’s susceptibility to RSV were reviewed by Simoes,[37] and include attendance in daycare and having pre-school or school-aged sibling(s). Also, higher numbers of people sleeping in the same room has been shown to increase the risk of hospitalization due to respiratory tract infection.[38,40] It is generally thought that breastfeeding confers some protection against RSV-associated lower respiratory tract infection,[37] such that children who are not breastfed are at increased risk. The air quality within the home is of importance as well; exposure to tobacco smoke may cause increased respiratory tract reactivity in susceptible infants, leading to exacerbation of respiratory disease.[41,42]

Bottom Line: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a highly contagious virus, and is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and toddlers worldwide.RSV prophylaxis (RSVP) with palivizumab has been shown to improve clinical outcome in infants who are considered high risk compared with those who have not received RSVP.The failure of healthcare staff and primary caregivers to protect children against an RSV infection can have lasting detrimental effects on the health and lives of affected children and their families.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. mbracht@mtsinai.on.ca

ABSTRACT
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a highly contagious virus, and is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and toddlers worldwide. RSV infection poses serious health risks to young children during the first 2 years of life. Several infant populations have been classified as high risk, and additional risk factors are known to increase the likelihood of severe RSV infection. Treatment for active RSV infection is limited to the symptoms of infection rather than the underlying cause; therefore, it is critical to reduce the transmission of RSV. As nurses, we highlight the importance of educating healthcare professionals, both in the hospital and community settings, as well as parents and other caregivers about the risks and outcomes associated with RSV infection, and necessary measures to decrease the risk of infection. We also highlight the importance of the successful identification of those children who are at high risk of RSV infection. RSV prophylaxis (RSVP) with palivizumab has been shown to improve clinical outcome in infants who are considered high risk compared with those who have not received RSVP. The failure of healthcare staff and primary caregivers to protect children against an RSV infection can have lasting detrimental effects on the health and lives of affected children and their families.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus