Limits...
Alcohol drinking cessation and the risk of laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Ahmad Kiadaliri A, Jarl J, Gavriilidis G, Gerdtham UG - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: A systematic literature review was conducted, and a meta-analysis was applied on the retrieved studies.On average, alcohol drinking cessation was associated with a 2% yearly reduction in the risk of developing laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers.Moreover, 5 years of drinking cessation was associated with a reduction of around 15% in the alcohol-related elevated risk of laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Health Economics, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the effect of alcohol cessation on the risk of developing laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers, combining available evidence in the scientific literature in a meta-analysis.

Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted, and a meta-analysis was applied on the retrieved studies. The generalised least squares method was used to estimate the trend from dose-response data to assess changes in the risks of laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers after drinking cessation.

Results: A total of 9 case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis (4 and 8 estimates for laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers, respectively). On average, alcohol drinking cessation was associated with a 2% yearly reduction in the risk of developing laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers. There was a considerable heterogeneity between the studies of pharyngeal cancer, but this was mostly due to two studies. The increased risk of laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers caused by alcohol was reversible; the time periods until the risks became equal to those of never drinkers were 36 (95% CI 11-106) and 39 (95% CI 13-103) years, respectively. Moreover, 5 years of drinking cessation was associated with a reduction of around 15% in the alcohol-related elevated risk of laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers.

Conclusion: Although a long time period is required to completely eliminate the alcohol-related elevated risk of laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers, a substantial risk reduction can be seen in the short term (5-10 years), and drinking cessation should therefore be encouraged to reduce the incidence of these cancers.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Risk of developing laryngeal and pharyngeal cancer for never drinkers vs. current drinkers.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3585880&req=5

pone-0058158-g003: Risk of developing laryngeal and pharyngeal cancer for never drinkers vs. current drinkers.

Mentions: The risk of developing laryngeal cancer was 47% (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.37–0.75) lower for never drinkers than for current drinkers (Figure 3). Combining this figure with the results of the meta-regression implies that the alcohol-related elevated risk of laryngeal cancer would last 36 (95% CI: 11–106) years after drinking cessation (Figure 4A).


Alcohol drinking cessation and the risk of laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Ahmad Kiadaliri A, Jarl J, Gavriilidis G, Gerdtham UG - PLoS ONE (2013)

Risk of developing laryngeal and pharyngeal cancer for never drinkers vs. current drinkers.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3585880&req=5

pone-0058158-g003: Risk of developing laryngeal and pharyngeal cancer for never drinkers vs. current drinkers.
Mentions: The risk of developing laryngeal cancer was 47% (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.37–0.75) lower for never drinkers than for current drinkers (Figure 3). Combining this figure with the results of the meta-regression implies that the alcohol-related elevated risk of laryngeal cancer would last 36 (95% CI: 11–106) years after drinking cessation (Figure 4A).

Bottom Line: A systematic literature review was conducted, and a meta-analysis was applied on the retrieved studies.On average, alcohol drinking cessation was associated with a 2% yearly reduction in the risk of developing laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers.Moreover, 5 years of drinking cessation was associated with a reduction of around 15% in the alcohol-related elevated risk of laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Health Economics, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the effect of alcohol cessation on the risk of developing laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers, combining available evidence in the scientific literature in a meta-analysis.

Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted, and a meta-analysis was applied on the retrieved studies. The generalised least squares method was used to estimate the trend from dose-response data to assess changes in the risks of laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers after drinking cessation.

Results: A total of 9 case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis (4 and 8 estimates for laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers, respectively). On average, alcohol drinking cessation was associated with a 2% yearly reduction in the risk of developing laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers. There was a considerable heterogeneity between the studies of pharyngeal cancer, but this was mostly due to two studies. The increased risk of laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers caused by alcohol was reversible; the time periods until the risks became equal to those of never drinkers were 36 (95% CI 11-106) and 39 (95% CI 13-103) years, respectively. Moreover, 5 years of drinking cessation was associated with a reduction of around 15% in the alcohol-related elevated risk of laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers.

Conclusion: Although a long time period is required to completely eliminate the alcohol-related elevated risk of laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers, a substantial risk reduction can be seen in the short term (5-10 years), and drinking cessation should therefore be encouraged to reduce the incidence of these cancers.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus