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The best timing of mate search in Armadillidium vulgare (Isopoda, Oniscidea).

Beauché F, Richard FJ - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: We found that the attractiveness of individuals was mediated by short-distance chemical cues and tested individuals were able to discriminate and prefer individuals of the opposite sex.Moreover, male preference to female increased during their moulting status as they matured.Males were particularly more attracted by females with appearing white calcium plates, which corresponds to the beginning of their higher receptivity period.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Université de Poitiers, Laboratoire Ecologie et Biologie des Interactions, UMR CNRS 7267, Equipe Ecologie Evolution Symbiose, Poitiers, France. Freddie.jeanne.richard@univ-poitiers.fr

ABSTRACT
Mate choice is mediated by many components with the criteria varying across the animal kingdom. Chemical cues used for mate attractiveness can also reflect mate quality. Regarding the gregarious species Armadillidium vulgare (isopod crustacean), we tested whether individuals can discriminate conspecifics at two different levels (between sex and physiological status) based on olfactory perception. Tested conspecifics were individuals of the same or opposite sex, with the females at different moult stages. We found that the attractiveness of individuals was mediated by short-distance chemical cues and tested individuals were able to discriminate and prefer individuals of the opposite sex. Moreover, male preference to female increased during their moulting status as they matured. Males were particularly more attracted by females with appearing white calcium plates, which corresponds to the beginning of their higher receptivity period. These differences in attractiveness due to sex and physiological status are likely to shape the composition of aggregates and facilitate mate finding and optimize the reproductive success for both males and females. Thus aggregation pheromones could be linked to sex pheromones in terrestrial isopods.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic view of the Y-shaped choice chamber used to test the detection of conspecifics by short-distance chemoreception in Armadillidium vulgare (I: initial position of tested individual, IIa and IIb : position of target individuals; NS: Neutral Section, IS: Intermediate Section, LS: Left Section, RS: Right section) with two plastic pipettes placed at the end of each tunnels and used to pulse air regularly into the system.
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pone-0057737-g002: Schematic view of the Y-shaped choice chamber used to test the detection of conspecifics by short-distance chemoreception in Armadillidium vulgare (I: initial position of tested individual, IIa and IIb : position of target individuals; NS: Neutral Section, IS: Intermediate Section, LS: Left Section, RS: Right section) with two plastic pipettes placed at the end of each tunnels and used to pulse air regularly into the system.

Mentions: To test the attractiveness of conspecifics in A. vulgare, we used a Y-shaped choice chamber (fig. 2) built in a plastic Petri dish (9.5 cm diameter) covered with a filter paper renewed between each experiment to avoid the presence of retained odours. The plastic elements of the device were cleaned using alcohol everyday. Rigid plastic tunnels were used, with two of them separated in two sections by a mesh in order to create the zones (IIa) and (IIb). This mesh was covered by an opaque paper with tiny holes so that the air could pass through it whilst preventing visual contact between the individuals. These papers were also changed between each experiment. Moreover, two plastic pipettes were sealed at the end of these tunnels to ensure gas exchange with the outside and were used to pulse air regularly (two light pressures at the beginning of the experiment and two others five minutes later) into the system passing through the sections (IIa) and (IIb) to spread the odour of the animals presented for choice.


The best timing of mate search in Armadillidium vulgare (Isopoda, Oniscidea).

Beauché F, Richard FJ - PLoS ONE (2013)

Schematic view of the Y-shaped choice chamber used to test the detection of conspecifics by short-distance chemoreception in Armadillidium vulgare (I: initial position of tested individual, IIa and IIb : position of target individuals; NS: Neutral Section, IS: Intermediate Section, LS: Left Section, RS: Right section) with two plastic pipettes placed at the end of each tunnels and used to pulse air regularly into the system.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3585876&req=5

pone-0057737-g002: Schematic view of the Y-shaped choice chamber used to test the detection of conspecifics by short-distance chemoreception in Armadillidium vulgare (I: initial position of tested individual, IIa and IIb : position of target individuals; NS: Neutral Section, IS: Intermediate Section, LS: Left Section, RS: Right section) with two plastic pipettes placed at the end of each tunnels and used to pulse air regularly into the system.
Mentions: To test the attractiveness of conspecifics in A. vulgare, we used a Y-shaped choice chamber (fig. 2) built in a plastic Petri dish (9.5 cm diameter) covered with a filter paper renewed between each experiment to avoid the presence of retained odours. The plastic elements of the device were cleaned using alcohol everyday. Rigid plastic tunnels were used, with two of them separated in two sections by a mesh in order to create the zones (IIa) and (IIb). This mesh was covered by an opaque paper with tiny holes so that the air could pass through it whilst preventing visual contact between the individuals. These papers were also changed between each experiment. Moreover, two plastic pipettes were sealed at the end of these tunnels to ensure gas exchange with the outside and were used to pulse air regularly (two light pressures at the beginning of the experiment and two others five minutes later) into the system passing through the sections (IIa) and (IIb) to spread the odour of the animals presented for choice.

Bottom Line: We found that the attractiveness of individuals was mediated by short-distance chemical cues and tested individuals were able to discriminate and prefer individuals of the opposite sex.Moreover, male preference to female increased during their moulting status as they matured.Males were particularly more attracted by females with appearing white calcium plates, which corresponds to the beginning of their higher receptivity period.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Université de Poitiers, Laboratoire Ecologie et Biologie des Interactions, UMR CNRS 7267, Equipe Ecologie Evolution Symbiose, Poitiers, France. Freddie.jeanne.richard@univ-poitiers.fr

ABSTRACT
Mate choice is mediated by many components with the criteria varying across the animal kingdom. Chemical cues used for mate attractiveness can also reflect mate quality. Regarding the gregarious species Armadillidium vulgare (isopod crustacean), we tested whether individuals can discriminate conspecifics at two different levels (between sex and physiological status) based on olfactory perception. Tested conspecifics were individuals of the same or opposite sex, with the females at different moult stages. We found that the attractiveness of individuals was mediated by short-distance chemical cues and tested individuals were able to discriminate and prefer individuals of the opposite sex. Moreover, male preference to female increased during their moulting status as they matured. Males were particularly more attracted by females with appearing white calcium plates, which corresponds to the beginning of their higher receptivity period. These differences in attractiveness due to sex and physiological status are likely to shape the composition of aggregates and facilitate mate finding and optimize the reproductive success for both males and females. Thus aggregation pheromones could be linked to sex pheromones in terrestrial isopods.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus