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CMV and Immunosenescence: from basics to clinics.

Solana R, Tarazona R, Aiello AE, Akbar AN, Appay V, Beswick M, Bosch JA, Campos C, Cantisán S, Cicin-Sain L, Derhovanessian E, Ferrando-Martínez S, Frasca D, Fulöp T, Govind S, Grubeck-Loebenstein B, Hill A, Hurme M, Kern F, Larbi A, López-Botet M, Maier AB, McElhaney JE, Moss P, Naumova E, Nikolich-Zugich J, Pera A, Rector JL, Riddell N, Sanchez-Correa B, Sansoni P, Sauce D, van Lier R, Wang GC, Wills MR, Zieliński M, Pawelec G - Immun Ageing (2012)

Bottom Line: Alone among herpesviruses, persistent Cytomegalovirus (CMV) markedly alters the numbers and proportions of peripheral immune cells in infected-vs-uninfected people.This contention remains controversial and was the primary subject of the Third International Workshop on CMV & Immunosenescence which was held in Cordoba, Spain, 15-16th March, 2012.Here we summarize the major findings of this workshop.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Immunology Unit, Instituto Maimónides de Investigación Biomédica de Córdoba (IMIBIC)-Reina Sofia University Hospital-University of Cordoba, Cordoba, Spain. rsolana@uco.es.

ABSTRACT
Alone among herpesviruses, persistent Cytomegalovirus (CMV) markedly alters the numbers and proportions of peripheral immune cells in infected-vs-uninfected people. Because the rate of CMV infection increases with age in most countries, it has been suggested that it drives or at least exacerbates "immunosenescence". This contention remains controversial and was the primary subject of the Third International Workshop on CMV & Immunosenescence which was held in Cordoba, Spain, 15-16th March, 2012. Discussions focused on several main themes including the effects of CMV on adaptive immunity and immunosenescence, characterization of CMV-specific T cells, impact of CMV infection and ageing on innate immunity, and finally, most important, the clinical implications of immunosenescence and CMV infection. Here we summarize the major findings of this workshop.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Age and CMV infection are major driving forces contributing to the deterioration of innate and adaptive immunity. Age-associated decrease of adaptive immunity is termed immunosenescence. The deregulation of innate immunity is associated with inflammageing. Immunosenescence and inflammageing play a significant role in the pathogenesis of different clinical situations that can lead to increased risk of frailty and death in the elderly.
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Figure 2: Age and CMV infection are major driving forces contributing to the deterioration of innate and adaptive immunity. Age-associated decrease of adaptive immunity is termed immunosenescence. The deregulation of innate immunity is associated with inflammageing. Immunosenescence and inflammageing play a significant role in the pathogenesis of different clinical situations that can lead to increased risk of frailty and death in the elderly.

Mentions: Results from translational research of CMV infection and immunosenescence in clinical conditions such as transplantation, cancer, immunodeficiency and autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, supports the notion that CMV can affect their evolution and prognosis by inducing a process of “early” immunosenescence (Figure 2). Furthermore, other extrinsic factors can also contribute, together with CMV, to the age-associated deterioration of the immune system.


CMV and Immunosenescence: from basics to clinics.

Solana R, Tarazona R, Aiello AE, Akbar AN, Appay V, Beswick M, Bosch JA, Campos C, Cantisán S, Cicin-Sain L, Derhovanessian E, Ferrando-Martínez S, Frasca D, Fulöp T, Govind S, Grubeck-Loebenstein B, Hill A, Hurme M, Kern F, Larbi A, López-Botet M, Maier AB, McElhaney JE, Moss P, Naumova E, Nikolich-Zugich J, Pera A, Rector JL, Riddell N, Sanchez-Correa B, Sansoni P, Sauce D, van Lier R, Wang GC, Wills MR, Zieliński M, Pawelec G - Immun Ageing (2012)

Age and CMV infection are major driving forces contributing to the deterioration of innate and adaptive immunity. Age-associated decrease of adaptive immunity is termed immunosenescence. The deregulation of innate immunity is associated with inflammageing. Immunosenescence and inflammageing play a significant role in the pathogenesis of different clinical situations that can lead to increased risk of frailty and death in the elderly.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3585851&req=5

Figure 2: Age and CMV infection are major driving forces contributing to the deterioration of innate and adaptive immunity. Age-associated decrease of adaptive immunity is termed immunosenescence. The deregulation of innate immunity is associated with inflammageing. Immunosenescence and inflammageing play a significant role in the pathogenesis of different clinical situations that can lead to increased risk of frailty and death in the elderly.
Mentions: Results from translational research of CMV infection and immunosenescence in clinical conditions such as transplantation, cancer, immunodeficiency and autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, supports the notion that CMV can affect their evolution and prognosis by inducing a process of “early” immunosenescence (Figure 2). Furthermore, other extrinsic factors can also contribute, together with CMV, to the age-associated deterioration of the immune system.

Bottom Line: Alone among herpesviruses, persistent Cytomegalovirus (CMV) markedly alters the numbers and proportions of peripheral immune cells in infected-vs-uninfected people.This contention remains controversial and was the primary subject of the Third International Workshop on CMV & Immunosenescence which was held in Cordoba, Spain, 15-16th March, 2012.Here we summarize the major findings of this workshop.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Immunology Unit, Instituto Maimónides de Investigación Biomédica de Córdoba (IMIBIC)-Reina Sofia University Hospital-University of Cordoba, Cordoba, Spain. rsolana@uco.es.

ABSTRACT
Alone among herpesviruses, persistent Cytomegalovirus (CMV) markedly alters the numbers and proportions of peripheral immune cells in infected-vs-uninfected people. Because the rate of CMV infection increases with age in most countries, it has been suggested that it drives or at least exacerbates "immunosenescence". This contention remains controversial and was the primary subject of the Third International Workshop on CMV & Immunosenescence which was held in Cordoba, Spain, 15-16th March, 2012. Discussions focused on several main themes including the effects of CMV on adaptive immunity and immunosenescence, characterization of CMV-specific T cells, impact of CMV infection and ageing on innate immunity, and finally, most important, the clinical implications of immunosenescence and CMV infection. Here we summarize the major findings of this workshop.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus