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Epidemiology of dentin hypersensitivity.

Splieth CH, Tachou A - Clin Oral Investig (2012)

Bottom Line: On the other hand, the number of affected seniors with tooth loss or even edentulism is reduced.Buccal surfaces clearly show the highest prevalence rates.However, further studies are necessary to find the cause of this condition and refine its management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Preventive and Pediatric Dentistry, Center for Oral Health, Ernst Moritz Arndt University Greifswald, Rotgerberstraße 8, 17487, Greifswald, Germany. splieth@uni-greifswald.de

ABSTRACT

Objective: In contrast to the well-established caries epidemiology, data on dentin hypersensitivity seem to be scarce and contradictory. This review evaluates the available literature on dentin hypersensitivity and assesses its prevalence, distribution, and potential changes.

Materials and methods: The systematic search was performed to identify and select relevant publications with several key words in electronic databases. In addition, the articles' bibliographies were consulted.

Results: Prevalence rates range from 3 to 98 %. This vast range can be explained partly by the differences in the selection criteria for the study sample and also the variety in diagnostic approaches or time frames. Women are slightly more affected than men and an age peak of 30-40 years has been reported. Still, the prevalence of erosions with dentin exposure seems to increase in younger adults, often resulting in hypersensitivity. In older patients, root surfaces are frequently exposed due to periodontal disease which is associated with a high rate of dentin hypersensitivity, especially after periodontal treatment and intensified brushing activity. On the other hand, the number of affected seniors with tooth loss or even edentulism is reduced. About 25-30 % of the adult population report dentin hypersensitivity. Most dentists also consider it to be a relevant problem in their practice, but they request more information on this topic. Maxillary teeth are affected to a higher extent, but the different teeth show very similar rates. Buccal surfaces clearly show the highest prevalence rates.

Conclusion: In spite of the advances regarding management of dentin hypersensitivity, it still remains an epidemiologically understudied field.

Clinical relevance: Although great variations have been observed in the prevalence of dentin hypersensitivity, this issue is often observed by dentists and related by patients. However, further studies are necessary to find the cause of this condition and refine its management.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Prevalence of exposed root surfaces, gingival recessions, and, therefore, exposed cervical dentin in German adults [30]
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Fig1: Prevalence of exposed root surfaces, gingival recessions, and, therefore, exposed cervical dentin in German adults [30]

Mentions: Another interesting point of discussion is the age distribution. Almost all studies report a reduction in prevalence for seniors, but also the number of dentate individuals, who exhibit teeth at risk, decreases with age. A similar epidemiological problem can be observed in root caries (Fig. 1). With tooth loss and edentulism, the number of teeth and individuals at risk is constantly reduced in a “classical” population. The distribution of exposed cervical dentin in Fig. 1 reflects the age distribution of dentin hypersensitivity assessed in Australian dental offices [18]. Therefore, it is important to calculate the relative risk for root caries which increases with age, meaning that the proportion of retained teeth affected by root caries grows continuously [29].Fig. 1


Epidemiology of dentin hypersensitivity.

Splieth CH, Tachou A - Clin Oral Investig (2012)

Prevalence of exposed root surfaces, gingival recessions, and, therefore, exposed cervical dentin in German adults [30]
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3585833&req=5

Fig1: Prevalence of exposed root surfaces, gingival recessions, and, therefore, exposed cervical dentin in German adults [30]
Mentions: Another interesting point of discussion is the age distribution. Almost all studies report a reduction in prevalence for seniors, but also the number of dentate individuals, who exhibit teeth at risk, decreases with age. A similar epidemiological problem can be observed in root caries (Fig. 1). With tooth loss and edentulism, the number of teeth and individuals at risk is constantly reduced in a “classical” population. The distribution of exposed cervical dentin in Fig. 1 reflects the age distribution of dentin hypersensitivity assessed in Australian dental offices [18]. Therefore, it is important to calculate the relative risk for root caries which increases with age, meaning that the proportion of retained teeth affected by root caries grows continuously [29].Fig. 1

Bottom Line: On the other hand, the number of affected seniors with tooth loss or even edentulism is reduced.Buccal surfaces clearly show the highest prevalence rates.However, further studies are necessary to find the cause of this condition and refine its management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Preventive and Pediatric Dentistry, Center for Oral Health, Ernst Moritz Arndt University Greifswald, Rotgerberstraße 8, 17487, Greifswald, Germany. splieth@uni-greifswald.de

ABSTRACT

Objective: In contrast to the well-established caries epidemiology, data on dentin hypersensitivity seem to be scarce and contradictory. This review evaluates the available literature on dentin hypersensitivity and assesses its prevalence, distribution, and potential changes.

Materials and methods: The systematic search was performed to identify and select relevant publications with several key words in electronic databases. In addition, the articles' bibliographies were consulted.

Results: Prevalence rates range from 3 to 98 %. This vast range can be explained partly by the differences in the selection criteria for the study sample and also the variety in diagnostic approaches or time frames. Women are slightly more affected than men and an age peak of 30-40 years has been reported. Still, the prevalence of erosions with dentin exposure seems to increase in younger adults, often resulting in hypersensitivity. In older patients, root surfaces are frequently exposed due to periodontal disease which is associated with a high rate of dentin hypersensitivity, especially after periodontal treatment and intensified brushing activity. On the other hand, the number of affected seniors with tooth loss or even edentulism is reduced. About 25-30 % of the adult population report dentin hypersensitivity. Most dentists also consider it to be a relevant problem in their practice, but they request more information on this topic. Maxillary teeth are affected to a higher extent, but the different teeth show very similar rates. Buccal surfaces clearly show the highest prevalence rates.

Conclusion: In spite of the advances regarding management of dentin hypersensitivity, it still remains an epidemiologically understudied field.

Clinical relevance: Although great variations have been observed in the prevalence of dentin hypersensitivity, this issue is often observed by dentists and related by patients. However, further studies are necessary to find the cause of this condition and refine its management.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus