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Mechanical, physico-chemical, and antimicrobial properties of gelatin-based film incorporated with catechin-lysozyme.

Rawdkuen S, Suthiluk P, Kamhangwong D, Benjakul S - Chem Cent J (2012)

Bottom Line: The effect of the catechin-lysozyme combination addition (CLC: 0, 0.125, 0.25, and 0.5%, w/v) on fish gelatin film properties was monitored.The light transmission of the film did not significantly decrease and nor did film transparency (p>0.05) with increased CLC.Inhibitory activity of the fish gelatin film against E.coli, S.aureus, L. innocua and S. cerevisiae was concentration dependent.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Food Technology Program, School of Agro-Industry, Mae Fah Luang University, Muang, Chiang Rai, 57100, Thailand. saroat@mfu.ac.th.

ABSTRACT

Background: Microbial activity is a primary cause of deterioration in many foods and is often responsible for reduced quality and safety. Food-borne illnesses associated with E. coli O157:H7, S. aureus, S. enteritidis and L. monocytogenes are a major public health concern throughout the world. A number of methods have been employed to control or prevent the growth of these microorganisms in food. Antimicrobial packaging is one of the most promising active packaging systems for effectively retarding the growth of food spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanical, physico-chemical properties and inhibitory effects of the fish gelatin films against selected food spoilage microorganisms when incorporated with catechin-lysozyme.

Results: The effect of the catechin-lysozyme combination addition (CLC: 0, 0.125, 0.25, and 0.5%, w/v) on fish gelatin film properties was monitored. At the level of 0.5% addition, the CLC showed the greatest elongation at break (EAB) at 143.17% with 0.039 mm thickness, and the lowest water vapor permeability (WVP) at 6.5 x 10-8 g·mm·h-1·cm-2·Pa-1, whereas the control showed high tensile strength (TS) and the highest WVP. Regarding color attributes, the gelatin film without CLC addition gave the highest lightness (L* 91.95) but lowest in redness (a*-1.29) and yellowness (b* 2.25) values. The light transmission of the film did not significantly decrease and nor did film transparency (p>0.05) with increased CLC. Incorporating CLC could not affect the film microstructure. The solubility of the gelatin based film incorporated with CLC was not affected, especially at a high level of addition (p>0.05). Inhibitory activity of the fish gelatin film against E.coli, S.aureus, L. innocua and S. cerevisiae was concentration dependent.

Conclusions: These findings suggested that CLC incorporation can improve mechanical, physico-chemical, and antimicrobial properties of the resulting films, thus allowing the films to become more applicable in active food packaging.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Protein pattern of fish gelatin based film incorporated with a combination of catechin and lysozyme at different concentrations. G: Gelatin; C: Control film; Numbers (0.125-0.500) denote the concentrations of the catechin and lysozyme combinations (%).
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Figure 3: Protein pattern of fish gelatin based film incorporated with a combination of catechin and lysozyme at different concentrations. G: Gelatin; C: Control film; Numbers (0.125-0.500) denote the concentrations of the catechin and lysozyme combinations (%).

Mentions: Protein patterns of gelatin based film incorporated with various concentrations of CLC are shown in Figure 3. High molecular weight (MW) components, including β, α1-, and α2-components as well as cross-linked constituents were observed in the SDS-PAGE. The starting gelatin (lane G) showed all of the main protein components that are normally found in gelatin samples. When the film was prepared, a slight decrease in band intensity of the β, α1-, and α2-components were clearly found (lane C). Moreover, cross-linked protein was also observed at the top of the separating gel. Slightly decreased band intensity of β, α1- and α2-components in the gelatin films was observed when the concentration of CLC increased (lane 0.125-0.5). This was coincidental with the increased protein cross-linking over the separating gel. From this result, CLC might induce the formation of cross-links via covalent bonds. Also, it was suggested that β-chain was more susceptible to cross-linking induced by lysozyme and/or catechin. The cross-linking in the film matrix was more pronounced with increasing CLC concentration. This was in accordance with the continuous decrease in the film’s TS and EAB (Table 1).


Mechanical, physico-chemical, and antimicrobial properties of gelatin-based film incorporated with catechin-lysozyme.

Rawdkuen S, Suthiluk P, Kamhangwong D, Benjakul S - Chem Cent J (2012)

Protein pattern of fish gelatin based film incorporated with a combination of catechin and lysozyme at different concentrations. G: Gelatin; C: Control film; Numbers (0.125-0.500) denote the concentrations of the catechin and lysozyme combinations (%).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3585795&req=5

Figure 3: Protein pattern of fish gelatin based film incorporated with a combination of catechin and lysozyme at different concentrations. G: Gelatin; C: Control film; Numbers (0.125-0.500) denote the concentrations of the catechin and lysozyme combinations (%).
Mentions: Protein patterns of gelatin based film incorporated with various concentrations of CLC are shown in Figure 3. High molecular weight (MW) components, including β, α1-, and α2-components as well as cross-linked constituents were observed in the SDS-PAGE. The starting gelatin (lane G) showed all of the main protein components that are normally found in gelatin samples. When the film was prepared, a slight decrease in band intensity of the β, α1-, and α2-components were clearly found (lane C). Moreover, cross-linked protein was also observed at the top of the separating gel. Slightly decreased band intensity of β, α1- and α2-components in the gelatin films was observed when the concentration of CLC increased (lane 0.125-0.5). This was coincidental with the increased protein cross-linking over the separating gel. From this result, CLC might induce the formation of cross-links via covalent bonds. Also, it was suggested that β-chain was more susceptible to cross-linking induced by lysozyme and/or catechin. The cross-linking in the film matrix was more pronounced with increasing CLC concentration. This was in accordance with the continuous decrease in the film’s TS and EAB (Table 1).

Bottom Line: The effect of the catechin-lysozyme combination addition (CLC: 0, 0.125, 0.25, and 0.5%, w/v) on fish gelatin film properties was monitored.The light transmission of the film did not significantly decrease and nor did film transparency (p>0.05) with increased CLC.Inhibitory activity of the fish gelatin film against E.coli, S.aureus, L. innocua and S. cerevisiae was concentration dependent.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Food Technology Program, School of Agro-Industry, Mae Fah Luang University, Muang, Chiang Rai, 57100, Thailand. saroat@mfu.ac.th.

ABSTRACT

Background: Microbial activity is a primary cause of deterioration in many foods and is often responsible for reduced quality and safety. Food-borne illnesses associated with E. coli O157:H7, S. aureus, S. enteritidis and L. monocytogenes are a major public health concern throughout the world. A number of methods have been employed to control or prevent the growth of these microorganisms in food. Antimicrobial packaging is one of the most promising active packaging systems for effectively retarding the growth of food spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanical, physico-chemical properties and inhibitory effects of the fish gelatin films against selected food spoilage microorganisms when incorporated with catechin-lysozyme.

Results: The effect of the catechin-lysozyme combination addition (CLC: 0, 0.125, 0.25, and 0.5%, w/v) on fish gelatin film properties was monitored. At the level of 0.5% addition, the CLC showed the greatest elongation at break (EAB) at 143.17% with 0.039 mm thickness, and the lowest water vapor permeability (WVP) at 6.5 x 10-8 g·mm·h-1·cm-2·Pa-1, whereas the control showed high tensile strength (TS) and the highest WVP. Regarding color attributes, the gelatin film without CLC addition gave the highest lightness (L* 91.95) but lowest in redness (a*-1.29) and yellowness (b* 2.25) values. The light transmission of the film did not significantly decrease and nor did film transparency (p>0.05) with increased CLC. Incorporating CLC could not affect the film microstructure. The solubility of the gelatin based film incorporated with CLC was not affected, especially at a high level of addition (p>0.05). Inhibitory activity of the fish gelatin film against E.coli, S.aureus, L. innocua and S. cerevisiae was concentration dependent.

Conclusions: These findings suggested that CLC incorporation can improve mechanical, physico-chemical, and antimicrobial properties of the resulting films, thus allowing the films to become more applicable in active food packaging.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus