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Combining traits and density to model recruitment of sessile organisms.

Giménez L, Jenkins SR - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Basal area, a trait that responded to increases in barnacle density, did not contribute significantly to explain patterns of recruitment.Fourth, seasonal variation and spatial variation in survival can be separated from that resulting from resource limitation; survival was predicted for two different shores and four sampling times using a single recruitment model.We conclude that applying this integrative approach to recruitment will lead to a considerable advance in understanding patterns of mortality of early stages of sessile organisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Ocean Science, Bangor University, Menai Bridge, United Kingdom. l.gimenez@bangor.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
We propose an integrative approach that explains patterns of recruitment to adult populations in sessile organisms by considering the numbers of individuals and their body size. A recruitment model, based on a small number of parameters, was developed for sessile organisms and tested using the barnacle Semibalanus balanoides, a marine invertebrate inhabiting North Atlantic intertidal shores. Incorporating barnacle body size improved model fit beyond that based on density alone, showing that growth played an important role in how resource limitation affected survival. Our approach uncovered the following: First, changes in the shape of the recruitment curve resulted from the balance between individual growth and mortality. Second, recruitment was limited by the least plastic trait used to characterise body size, operculum area. Basal area, a trait that responded to increases in barnacle density, did not contribute significantly to explain patterns of recruitment. Third, some temporal variation is explained by changes in the amount of space occupied by shells of dead barnacles: at high cover barnacles are densely packed and these shells remain long after death. Fourth, seasonal variation and spatial variation in survival can be separated from that resulting from resource limitation; survival was predicted for two different shores and four sampling times using a single recruitment model. We conclude that applying this integrative approach to recruitment will lead to a considerable advance in understanding patterns of mortality of early stages of sessile organisms.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Semibalanus balanoides.Relationships between barnacle individual traits (average operculum and basal surface area) and density in 52 sites per shores and at three times (June, July, October).
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pone-0057849-g005: Semibalanus balanoides.Relationships between barnacle individual traits (average operculum and basal surface area) and density in 52 sites per shores and at three times (June, July, October).

Mentions: In considering the better predictive power of models using operculum area as opposed to basal area, the way in which these traits respond to density is important. Operculum area showed low and non-significant correlation with density (Fig. 5a, c) while basal area responded plastically to density with lower average basal area per individual at higher barnacle density (Fig. 5b, d).


Combining traits and density to model recruitment of sessile organisms.

Giménez L, Jenkins SR - PLoS ONE (2013)

Semibalanus balanoides.Relationships between barnacle individual traits (average operculum and basal surface area) and density in 52 sites per shores and at three times (June, July, October).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3585730&req=5

pone-0057849-g005: Semibalanus balanoides.Relationships between barnacle individual traits (average operculum and basal surface area) and density in 52 sites per shores and at three times (June, July, October).
Mentions: In considering the better predictive power of models using operculum area as opposed to basal area, the way in which these traits respond to density is important. Operculum area showed low and non-significant correlation with density (Fig. 5a, c) while basal area responded plastically to density with lower average basal area per individual at higher barnacle density (Fig. 5b, d).

Bottom Line: Basal area, a trait that responded to increases in barnacle density, did not contribute significantly to explain patterns of recruitment.Fourth, seasonal variation and spatial variation in survival can be separated from that resulting from resource limitation; survival was predicted for two different shores and four sampling times using a single recruitment model.We conclude that applying this integrative approach to recruitment will lead to a considerable advance in understanding patterns of mortality of early stages of sessile organisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Ocean Science, Bangor University, Menai Bridge, United Kingdom. l.gimenez@bangor.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
We propose an integrative approach that explains patterns of recruitment to adult populations in sessile organisms by considering the numbers of individuals and their body size. A recruitment model, based on a small number of parameters, was developed for sessile organisms and tested using the barnacle Semibalanus balanoides, a marine invertebrate inhabiting North Atlantic intertidal shores. Incorporating barnacle body size improved model fit beyond that based on density alone, showing that growth played an important role in how resource limitation affected survival. Our approach uncovered the following: First, changes in the shape of the recruitment curve resulted from the balance between individual growth and mortality. Second, recruitment was limited by the least plastic trait used to characterise body size, operculum area. Basal area, a trait that responded to increases in barnacle density, did not contribute significantly to explain patterns of recruitment. Third, some temporal variation is explained by changes in the amount of space occupied by shells of dead barnacles: at high cover barnacles are densely packed and these shells remain long after death. Fourth, seasonal variation and spatial variation in survival can be separated from that resulting from resource limitation; survival was predicted for two different shores and four sampling times using a single recruitment model. We conclude that applying this integrative approach to recruitment will lead to a considerable advance in understanding patterns of mortality of early stages of sessile organisms.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus