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Decreased right temporal activation and increased interhemispheric connectivity in response to speech in preterm infants at term-equivalent age.

Naoi N, Fuchino Y, Shibata M, Niwa F, Kawai M, Konishi Y, Okanoya K, Myowa-Yamakoshi M - Front Psychol (2013)

Bottom Line: The results showed that compared with ADS, IDS increased activity in larger brain areas such as the bilateral frontotemporal, temporal, and temporoparietal regions, both in full-term and preterm infants.Preterm infants exhibited decreased activity in response to speech stimuli in the right temporal region compared with full-term infants, although the significance was low.Moreover, preterm infants exhibited increased interhemispheric connectivity compared with full-term controls, especially in the temporal and temporoparietal regions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Okanoya Emotional Information Project, The Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology, Japan Agency of Science and Technology Saitama, Japan ; Graduate School of Education, Kyoto University Kyoto, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Preterm infants are at increased risk of language-related problems later in life; however, few studies have examined the effects of preterm birth on cerebral responses to speech at very early developmental stages. This study examined cerebral activation and functional connectivity in response to infant-directed speech (IDS) and adult-directed speech (ADS) in full-term neonates and preterm infants at term-equivalent age using 94-channel near-infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that compared with ADS, IDS increased activity in larger brain areas such as the bilateral frontotemporal, temporal, and temporoparietal regions, both in full-term and preterm infants. Preterm infants exhibited decreased activity in response to speech stimuli in the right temporal region compared with full-term infants, although the significance was low. Moreover, preterm infants exhibited increased interhemispheric connectivity compared with full-term controls, especially in the temporal and temporoparietal regions. These differences suggest that preterm infants may follow different developmental trajectories from those born at term owing to differences in intrauterine and extrauterine development.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Grand-averaged time courses of changes in oxy- and deoxy-Hb in ADS and IDS conditions for all 94 channels in the preterm and full-term infant groups. Red and blue solid lines represent oxy-Hb and deoxy-Hb, respectively, in response to ADS and IDS conditions.
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Figure 2: Grand-averaged time courses of changes in oxy- and deoxy-Hb in ADS and IDS conditions for all 94 channels in the preterm and full-term infant groups. Red and blue solid lines represent oxy-Hb and deoxy-Hb, respectively, in response to ADS and IDS conditions.

Mentions: Hemodynamic responses in preterm and full-term infants to ADS and IDS compared with those to the control stimuli (pink noise) are shown in Figure 2. In the preterm and full-term groups, the channels in the bilateral temporal regions exhibited a distinctive increase in oxy-Hb in response to ADS and IDS stimuli.


Decreased right temporal activation and increased interhemispheric connectivity in response to speech in preterm infants at term-equivalent age.

Naoi N, Fuchino Y, Shibata M, Niwa F, Kawai M, Konishi Y, Okanoya K, Myowa-Yamakoshi M - Front Psychol (2013)

Grand-averaged time courses of changes in oxy- and deoxy-Hb in ADS and IDS conditions for all 94 channels in the preterm and full-term infant groups. Red and blue solid lines represent oxy-Hb and deoxy-Hb, respectively, in response to ADS and IDS conditions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3585712&req=5

Figure 2: Grand-averaged time courses of changes in oxy- and deoxy-Hb in ADS and IDS conditions for all 94 channels in the preterm and full-term infant groups. Red and blue solid lines represent oxy-Hb and deoxy-Hb, respectively, in response to ADS and IDS conditions.
Mentions: Hemodynamic responses in preterm and full-term infants to ADS and IDS compared with those to the control stimuli (pink noise) are shown in Figure 2. In the preterm and full-term groups, the channels in the bilateral temporal regions exhibited a distinctive increase in oxy-Hb in response to ADS and IDS stimuli.

Bottom Line: The results showed that compared with ADS, IDS increased activity in larger brain areas such as the bilateral frontotemporal, temporal, and temporoparietal regions, both in full-term and preterm infants.Preterm infants exhibited decreased activity in response to speech stimuli in the right temporal region compared with full-term infants, although the significance was low.Moreover, preterm infants exhibited increased interhemispheric connectivity compared with full-term controls, especially in the temporal and temporoparietal regions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Okanoya Emotional Information Project, The Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology, Japan Agency of Science and Technology Saitama, Japan ; Graduate School of Education, Kyoto University Kyoto, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Preterm infants are at increased risk of language-related problems later in life; however, few studies have examined the effects of preterm birth on cerebral responses to speech at very early developmental stages. This study examined cerebral activation and functional connectivity in response to infant-directed speech (IDS) and adult-directed speech (ADS) in full-term neonates and preterm infants at term-equivalent age using 94-channel near-infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that compared with ADS, IDS increased activity in larger brain areas such as the bilateral frontotemporal, temporal, and temporoparietal regions, both in full-term and preterm infants. Preterm infants exhibited decreased activity in response to speech stimuli in the right temporal region compared with full-term infants, although the significance was low. Moreover, preterm infants exhibited increased interhemispheric connectivity compared with full-term controls, especially in the temporal and temporoparietal regions. These differences suggest that preterm infants may follow different developmental trajectories from those born at term owing to differences in intrauterine and extrauterine development.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus