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Intimate partner violence and musculoskeletal injury: bridging the knowledge gap in orthopaedic fracture clinics.

Sprague S, Madden K, Dosanjh S, Godin K, Goslings JC, Schemitsch EH, Bhandari M - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2013)

Bottom Line: There have been widespread research efforts in the area of IPV over the past several decades, primarily focusing on obstetrics, emergency medicine, and primary care settings.Until recently there has been a paucity of research focusing on IPV in surgery, and thus a resultant knowledge gap.Our review summarizes the evidence from surgical research in the field of IPV and provides recommendations for developing and evaluating an IPV identification and support program and opportunities for future research.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, 293 Wellington St, N Suite 110, L8L 8E7, Hamilton, ON, Canada. sprags@mcmaster.ca

ABSTRACT
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious health issue. There have been widespread research efforts in the area of IPV over the past several decades, primarily focusing on obstetrics, emergency medicine, and primary care settings. Until recently there has been a paucity of research focusing on IPV in surgery, and thus a resultant knowledge gap. Renewed interest in the underlying risk of IPV among women with musculoskeletal injuries has fueled several important studies to determine the nature and scope of this issue in orthopaedic surgery. Our review summarizes the evidence from surgical research in the field of IPV and provides recommendations for developing and evaluating an IPV identification and support program and opportunities for future research.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Recommended IPV screening questions for orthopaedics (a subset of the WAST).
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Figure 2: Recommended IPV screening questions for orthopaedics (a subset of the WAST).

Mentions: Several shorter tools that were designed to be used in clinic are widely used. The Woman Abuse Screening tool (WAST)[41], Partner Violence Screen (PVS)[42], and Abuse Assessment Screen (AAS)[43] are among the most widely used and validated short screening tools[38]. In orthopaedic trauma populations, previous research has found that the WAST and PVS have very good specificity, but the sensitivity is relatively low[12]. It is important that we maximize sensitivity with IPV screening tools to avoid missing the opportunity to assist victims. Although good specificity is fairly important, having a good set of questions to begin with is essential from which HCPs can initiate a more in-depth conversation with the patient[12]. Although these tools are frequently used in other settings, there is a subset of the WAST questions that have increased sensitivity in the orthopaedic trauma population[12] (FigureĀ 2). A simple set of three questions is easy to remember, does not take a lot of time, and the results can be determined easily, not with a complicated scoring procedure. In addition, the American Medical Association and the Canadian Orthopaedic Association recommend using direct questions because they are easy to understand and tend to elicit direct responses[15,44].


Intimate partner violence and musculoskeletal injury: bridging the knowledge gap in orthopaedic fracture clinics.

Sprague S, Madden K, Dosanjh S, Godin K, Goslings JC, Schemitsch EH, Bhandari M - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2013)

Recommended IPV screening questions for orthopaedics (a subset of the WAST).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3585708&req=5

Figure 2: Recommended IPV screening questions for orthopaedics (a subset of the WAST).
Mentions: Several shorter tools that were designed to be used in clinic are widely used. The Woman Abuse Screening tool (WAST)[41], Partner Violence Screen (PVS)[42], and Abuse Assessment Screen (AAS)[43] are among the most widely used and validated short screening tools[38]. In orthopaedic trauma populations, previous research has found that the WAST and PVS have very good specificity, but the sensitivity is relatively low[12]. It is important that we maximize sensitivity with IPV screening tools to avoid missing the opportunity to assist victims. Although good specificity is fairly important, having a good set of questions to begin with is essential from which HCPs can initiate a more in-depth conversation with the patient[12]. Although these tools are frequently used in other settings, there is a subset of the WAST questions that have increased sensitivity in the orthopaedic trauma population[12] (FigureĀ 2). A simple set of three questions is easy to remember, does not take a lot of time, and the results can be determined easily, not with a complicated scoring procedure. In addition, the American Medical Association and the Canadian Orthopaedic Association recommend using direct questions because they are easy to understand and tend to elicit direct responses[15,44].

Bottom Line: There have been widespread research efforts in the area of IPV over the past several decades, primarily focusing on obstetrics, emergency medicine, and primary care settings.Until recently there has been a paucity of research focusing on IPV in surgery, and thus a resultant knowledge gap.Our review summarizes the evidence from surgical research in the field of IPV and provides recommendations for developing and evaluating an IPV identification and support program and opportunities for future research.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, 293 Wellington St, N Suite 110, L8L 8E7, Hamilton, ON, Canada. sprags@mcmaster.ca

ABSTRACT
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious health issue. There have been widespread research efforts in the area of IPV over the past several decades, primarily focusing on obstetrics, emergency medicine, and primary care settings. Until recently there has been a paucity of research focusing on IPV in surgery, and thus a resultant knowledge gap. Renewed interest in the underlying risk of IPV among women with musculoskeletal injuries has fueled several important studies to determine the nature and scope of this issue in orthopaedic surgery. Our review summarizes the evidence from surgical research in the field of IPV and provides recommendations for developing and evaluating an IPV identification and support program and opportunities for future research.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus