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Self-reported patient safety competence among new graduates in medicine, nursing and pharmacy.

Ginsburg LR, Tregunno D, Norton PG - BMJ Qual Saf (2012)

Bottom Line: All HP groups reported feeling more confident in the dimension of PS learning related to effective communication with patients and other providers.Greater confidence in PS learning was reported for learning experiences in the clinical setting compared with the class setting with one exception-nurses' confidence in learning about working in teams with other HPs deteriorated as they moved from thinking about learning in the classroom setting to thinking about learning in the clinical setting.Large-scale efforts are required to more deeply and consistently embed PS learning into HP education.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Health Policy and Management, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. lgins@yorku.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: As efforts to address patient safety (PS) in health professional (HP) education increase, it is important to understand new HPs' perspectives on their own PS competence at entry to practice. This study examines the self-reported PS competence of newly registered nurses, pharmacists and physicians.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 4496 new graduates in medicine (1779), nursing (2196) and pharmacy (521) using the HP Education in PS Survey (H-PEPSS). The H-PEPSS measures HPs' self-reported PS competence on six socio-cultural dimensions of PS, including culture, teamwork, communication, managing risk, responding to risk and understanding human factors. The H-PEPSS asks about confidence in PS learning in classroom and clinical settings.

Results: All HP groups reported feeling more confident in the dimension of PS learning related to effective communication with patients and other providers. Greater confidence in PS learning was reported for learning experiences in the clinical setting compared with the class setting with one exception-nurses' confidence in learning about working in teams with other HPs deteriorated as they moved from thinking about learning in the classroom setting to thinking about learning in the clinical setting.

Conclusions: Large-scale efforts are required to more deeply and consistently embed PS learning into HP education. However, efforts to embed PS learning in HP education seem to be hampered by deficiencies that persist in the culture of the clinical training environments in which we educate and acculturate new HPs.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Items in the Working in teams with other health professionals dimension. PGY1, postgraduate year 1.
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BMJQS2012001308F1: Items in the Working in teams with other health professionals dimension. PGY1, postgraduate year 1.

Mentions: A focus on individual items is also useful for more closely examining the dimension Working in teams with other HPs. Table 1 indicates that the Working in teams with other HPs dimension scores lower than many or all dimensions across all four groups. In addition, the only instance when nurses’ level of confidence in learning is significantly lower than any of the other HP groups we examined is for learning in the clinical setting related to Working in teams with other HPs. Furthermore, nurses’ confidence in learning related to Working in teams with other HPs is not only significantly lower for learning in the clinical setting than for learning in the classroom setting but the magnitude of this difference is important (Cohen's d=0.33, which is a small to medium effect size).39Figure 1 shows the percentage of respondents in each HP group who agree with each of the three items in this dimension. On items 9 and 10, 12% and 20% fewer nurses were confident following clinical learning than classroom learning. In contrast, pharmacists and postgraduates expressed far greater confidence in learning on all three items as they move from thinking about classroom learning to learning in the clinical setting. Online appendix 1 shows all of the items in each dimension and the percentage of respondents in each HP group who agreed or strongly agreed with each question.


Self-reported patient safety competence among new graduates in medicine, nursing and pharmacy.

Ginsburg LR, Tregunno D, Norton PG - BMJ Qual Saf (2012)

Items in the Working in teams with other health professionals dimension. PGY1, postgraduate year 1.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3585493&req=5

BMJQS2012001308F1: Items in the Working in teams with other health professionals dimension. PGY1, postgraduate year 1.
Mentions: A focus on individual items is also useful for more closely examining the dimension Working in teams with other HPs. Table 1 indicates that the Working in teams with other HPs dimension scores lower than many or all dimensions across all four groups. In addition, the only instance when nurses’ level of confidence in learning is significantly lower than any of the other HP groups we examined is for learning in the clinical setting related to Working in teams with other HPs. Furthermore, nurses’ confidence in learning related to Working in teams with other HPs is not only significantly lower for learning in the clinical setting than for learning in the classroom setting but the magnitude of this difference is important (Cohen's d=0.33, which is a small to medium effect size).39Figure 1 shows the percentage of respondents in each HP group who agree with each of the three items in this dimension. On items 9 and 10, 12% and 20% fewer nurses were confident following clinical learning than classroom learning. In contrast, pharmacists and postgraduates expressed far greater confidence in learning on all three items as they move from thinking about classroom learning to learning in the clinical setting. Online appendix 1 shows all of the items in each dimension and the percentage of respondents in each HP group who agreed or strongly agreed with each question.

Bottom Line: All HP groups reported feeling more confident in the dimension of PS learning related to effective communication with patients and other providers.Greater confidence in PS learning was reported for learning experiences in the clinical setting compared with the class setting with one exception-nurses' confidence in learning about working in teams with other HPs deteriorated as they moved from thinking about learning in the classroom setting to thinking about learning in the clinical setting.Large-scale efforts are required to more deeply and consistently embed PS learning into HP education.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Health Policy and Management, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. lgins@yorku.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: As efforts to address patient safety (PS) in health professional (HP) education increase, it is important to understand new HPs' perspectives on their own PS competence at entry to practice. This study examines the self-reported PS competence of newly registered nurses, pharmacists and physicians.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 4496 new graduates in medicine (1779), nursing (2196) and pharmacy (521) using the HP Education in PS Survey (H-PEPSS). The H-PEPSS measures HPs' self-reported PS competence on six socio-cultural dimensions of PS, including culture, teamwork, communication, managing risk, responding to risk and understanding human factors. The H-PEPSS asks about confidence in PS learning in classroom and clinical settings.

Results: All HP groups reported feeling more confident in the dimension of PS learning related to effective communication with patients and other providers. Greater confidence in PS learning was reported for learning experiences in the clinical setting compared with the class setting with one exception-nurses' confidence in learning about working in teams with other HPs deteriorated as they moved from thinking about learning in the classroom setting to thinking about learning in the clinical setting.

Conclusions: Large-scale efforts are required to more deeply and consistently embed PS learning into HP education. However, efforts to embed PS learning in HP education seem to be hampered by deficiencies that persist in the culture of the clinical training environments in which we educate and acculturate new HPs.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus