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Tracking dynamic microvascular changes during healing after complete biopsy punch on the mouse pinna using optical microangiography.

Jung Y, Dziennis S, Zhi Z, Reif R, Zheng Y, Wang RK - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: The highest rate of wound closure occurred between days 8 and 22.The vessel tortuosity increased during this time suggesting angiogenesis.The use of OMAG has great potential to improve our understanding of vascular and tissue responses to injury in order to develop more effective therapeutics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Optical microangiography (OMAG) and Doppler optical microangiography (DOMAG) are two non-invasive techniques capable of determining the tissue microstructural content, microvasculature angiography, and blood flow velocity and direction. These techniques were used to visualize the acute and chronic microvascular and tissue responses upon an injury in vivo. A tissue wound was induced using a 0.5 mm biopsy punch on a mouse pinna. The changes in the microangiography, blood flow velocity and direction were quantified for the acute (<30 min) wound response and the changes in the tissue structure and microangiography were determined for the chronic wound response (30 min-60 days). The initial wound triggered recruitment of peripheral capillaries, as well as redirection of main arterial and venous blood flow within 3 min. The complex vascular networks and new vessel formation were quantified during the chronic response using fractal dimension. The highest rate of wound closure occurred between days 8 and 22. The vessel tortuosity increased during this time suggesting angiogenesis. Taken together, these data signify that OMAG has the capability to track acute and chronic changes in blood flow, microangiography and structure during wound healing. The use of OMAG has great potential to improve our understanding of vascular and tissue responses to injury in order to develop more effective therapeutics.

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Schematic diagram of the spectral domain optical coherence tomography system and example of typical in vivo image obtained from the system.(a) SC source =  Supercontinuum light source; PC = polarization controller. (b) Projection-view OMAG image of the whole mouse pinna before the wound. The system was capable of resolving blood vessel networks down to the capillary level.
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pone-0057976-g001: Schematic diagram of the spectral domain optical coherence tomography system and example of typical in vivo image obtained from the system.(a) SC source =  Supercontinuum light source; PC = polarization controller. (b) Projection-view OMAG image of the whole mouse pinna before the wound. The system was capable of resolving blood vessel networks down to the capillary level.

Mentions: The system is illustrated in Fig.1 (A). The light emitted from a supercontinuum source (Koheras A/S, Denmark) was used as the light source to illuminate the system. The light source had a central wavelength ∼820 nm with a spectral bandwidth of ∼120 nm, providing ∼2.5 µm theoretical axial resolution in tissue for the system. The lights reflected from the reference mirror and backscattered from the sample were combined and formed interference signal that was then subsequently sent to a home-built spectrometer for detection. The spectrometer is based on a high speed complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor camera (4096 linear pixel-array, Basler SPL 4096-70 KM, Germany), giving an imaging speed of 70 kHz A-line rate for the system. At this imaging speed, the system sensitivity was measured at ∼90 dB around the zero delay line, which fell off to 70 dB at ±3 mm position. In the sample arm, we used a 10×objective lens with an effective focal length of 18 mm and achieved a lateral resolution of 5.8 µm as previously demonstrated [29]. The 3D imaging was accomplished by an x-y galvanometer scanner that scanned the probe beam in the sample arm at the sample surface.


Tracking dynamic microvascular changes during healing after complete biopsy punch on the mouse pinna using optical microangiography.

Jung Y, Dziennis S, Zhi Z, Reif R, Zheng Y, Wang RK - PLoS ONE (2013)

Schematic diagram of the spectral domain optical coherence tomography system and example of typical in vivo image obtained from the system.(a) SC source =  Supercontinuum light source; PC = polarization controller. (b) Projection-view OMAG image of the whole mouse pinna before the wound. The system was capable of resolving blood vessel networks down to the capillary level.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3585416&req=5

pone-0057976-g001: Schematic diagram of the spectral domain optical coherence tomography system and example of typical in vivo image obtained from the system.(a) SC source =  Supercontinuum light source; PC = polarization controller. (b) Projection-view OMAG image of the whole mouse pinna before the wound. The system was capable of resolving blood vessel networks down to the capillary level.
Mentions: The system is illustrated in Fig.1 (A). The light emitted from a supercontinuum source (Koheras A/S, Denmark) was used as the light source to illuminate the system. The light source had a central wavelength ∼820 nm with a spectral bandwidth of ∼120 nm, providing ∼2.5 µm theoretical axial resolution in tissue for the system. The lights reflected from the reference mirror and backscattered from the sample were combined and formed interference signal that was then subsequently sent to a home-built spectrometer for detection. The spectrometer is based on a high speed complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor camera (4096 linear pixel-array, Basler SPL 4096-70 KM, Germany), giving an imaging speed of 70 kHz A-line rate for the system. At this imaging speed, the system sensitivity was measured at ∼90 dB around the zero delay line, which fell off to 70 dB at ±3 mm position. In the sample arm, we used a 10×objective lens with an effective focal length of 18 mm and achieved a lateral resolution of 5.8 µm as previously demonstrated [29]. The 3D imaging was accomplished by an x-y galvanometer scanner that scanned the probe beam in the sample arm at the sample surface.

Bottom Line: The highest rate of wound closure occurred between days 8 and 22.The vessel tortuosity increased during this time suggesting angiogenesis.The use of OMAG has great potential to improve our understanding of vascular and tissue responses to injury in order to develop more effective therapeutics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Optical microangiography (OMAG) and Doppler optical microangiography (DOMAG) are two non-invasive techniques capable of determining the tissue microstructural content, microvasculature angiography, and blood flow velocity and direction. These techniques were used to visualize the acute and chronic microvascular and tissue responses upon an injury in vivo. A tissue wound was induced using a 0.5 mm biopsy punch on a mouse pinna. The changes in the microangiography, blood flow velocity and direction were quantified for the acute (<30 min) wound response and the changes in the tissue structure and microangiography were determined for the chronic wound response (30 min-60 days). The initial wound triggered recruitment of peripheral capillaries, as well as redirection of main arterial and venous blood flow within 3 min. The complex vascular networks and new vessel formation were quantified during the chronic response using fractal dimension. The highest rate of wound closure occurred between days 8 and 22. The vessel tortuosity increased during this time suggesting angiogenesis. Taken together, these data signify that OMAG has the capability to track acute and chronic changes in blood flow, microangiography and structure during wound healing. The use of OMAG has great potential to improve our understanding of vascular and tissue responses to injury in order to develop more effective therapeutics.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus