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Statins and the risk of lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

Tan M, Song X, Zhang G, Peng A, Li X, Li M, Liu Y, Wang C - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Study-specific risk estimates were pooled using a random-effects model.Low evidence of publication bias was found.However, statistically significant heterogeneity was found among cohort studies and among case-control studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Medicine, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Several epidemiologic studies have evaluated the association between statins and lung cancer risk, whereas randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on cardiovascular outcomes provide relevant data as a secondary end point. We conducted a meta-analysis of all relevant studies to examine this association.

Methods: A systematic literature search up to March 2012 was performed in PubMed database. Study-specific risk estimates were pooled using a random-effects model.

Results: Nineteen studies (5 RCTs and 14 observational studies) involving 38,013 lung cancer cases contributed to the analysis. They were grouped on the basis of study design, and separate meta-analyses were conducted. There was no evidence of an association between statin use and risk of lung cancer either among RCTs (relative risk [RR] 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.76-1.09), among cohort studies (RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.82-1.07), or among case-control studies (RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.57-1.16). Low evidence of publication bias was found. However, statistically significant heterogeneity was found among cohort studies and among case-control studies. After excluding the studies contributing most to the heterogeneity, summary estimates were essentially unchanged.

Conclusion: The results of our meta-analysis suggest that there is no association between statin use and the risk of lung cancer.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

In observational studies, risk estimates of lung cancer associated with statin use.Squares indicate study-specific risk estimates (size of the square reflects the study-specific statistical weight, i.e., the inverse of the variance); horizontal lines indicate 95% confidence intervals (CIs); diamonds indicate summary risk estimate with its corresponding 95% confidence interval.
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pone-0057349-g003: In observational studies, risk estimates of lung cancer associated with statin use.Squares indicate study-specific risk estimates (size of the square reflects the study-specific statistical weight, i.e., the inverse of the variance); horizontal lines indicate 95% confidence intervals (CIs); diamonds indicate summary risk estimate with its corresponding 95% confidence interval.

Mentions: The multivariable-adjusted RRs of lung cancer for statin use in individual observational studies and summary estimates are shown in Figure 3. The overall RR of lung cancer for statin use was 0.88 (95% CI 0.75–1.04) for observational studies combined. There was statistically significant heterogeneity among studies (P < 0.001; I2  =  95.1%). The Egger test showed no evidence of publication bias (P  =  0.43).


Statins and the risk of lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

Tan M, Song X, Zhang G, Peng A, Li X, Li M, Liu Y, Wang C - PLoS ONE (2013)

In observational studies, risk estimates of lung cancer associated with statin use.Squares indicate study-specific risk estimates (size of the square reflects the study-specific statistical weight, i.e., the inverse of the variance); horizontal lines indicate 95% confidence intervals (CIs); diamonds indicate summary risk estimate with its corresponding 95% confidence interval.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3585354&req=5

pone-0057349-g003: In observational studies, risk estimates of lung cancer associated with statin use.Squares indicate study-specific risk estimates (size of the square reflects the study-specific statistical weight, i.e., the inverse of the variance); horizontal lines indicate 95% confidence intervals (CIs); diamonds indicate summary risk estimate with its corresponding 95% confidence interval.
Mentions: The multivariable-adjusted RRs of lung cancer for statin use in individual observational studies and summary estimates are shown in Figure 3. The overall RR of lung cancer for statin use was 0.88 (95% CI 0.75–1.04) for observational studies combined. There was statistically significant heterogeneity among studies (P < 0.001; I2  =  95.1%). The Egger test showed no evidence of publication bias (P  =  0.43).

Bottom Line: Study-specific risk estimates were pooled using a random-effects model.Low evidence of publication bias was found.However, statistically significant heterogeneity was found among cohort studies and among case-control studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Medicine, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Several epidemiologic studies have evaluated the association between statins and lung cancer risk, whereas randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on cardiovascular outcomes provide relevant data as a secondary end point. We conducted a meta-analysis of all relevant studies to examine this association.

Methods: A systematic literature search up to March 2012 was performed in PubMed database. Study-specific risk estimates were pooled using a random-effects model.

Results: Nineteen studies (5 RCTs and 14 observational studies) involving 38,013 lung cancer cases contributed to the analysis. They were grouped on the basis of study design, and separate meta-analyses were conducted. There was no evidence of an association between statin use and risk of lung cancer either among RCTs (relative risk [RR] 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.76-1.09), among cohort studies (RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.82-1.07), or among case-control studies (RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.57-1.16). Low evidence of publication bias was found. However, statistically significant heterogeneity was found among cohort studies and among case-control studies. After excluding the studies contributing most to the heterogeneity, summary estimates were essentially unchanged.

Conclusion: The results of our meta-analysis suggest that there is no association between statin use and the risk of lung cancer.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus