Limits...
Monolayer stress microscopy: limitations, artifacts, and accuracy of recovered intercellular stresses.

Tambe DT, Croutelle U, Trepat X, Park CY, Kim JH, Millet E, Butler JP, Fredberg JJ - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: To assess the validity of these assumptions and to quantify associated errors, here we report new analytical, numerical, and experimental investigations.For several commonly used experimental monolayer systems, the simplifying assumptions used previously lead to errors that are shown to be quite small.Out-of-plane components of displacement and traction fields can be safely neglected, and characteristic features of intercellular stresses that underlie plithotaxis remain largely unaffected.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. dhananjay@alumni.brown.edu

ABSTRACT
In wound healing, tissue growth, and certain cancers, the epithelial or the endothelial monolayer sheet expands. Within the expanding monolayer sheet, migration of the individual cell is strongly guided by physical forces imposed by adjacent cells. This process is called plithotaxis and was discovered using Monolayer Stress Microscopy (MSM). MSM rests upon certain simplifying assumptions, however, concerning boundary conditions, cell material properties and system dimensionality. To assess the validity of these assumptions and to quantify associated errors, here we report new analytical, numerical, and experimental investigations. For several commonly used experimental monolayer systems, the simplifying assumptions used previously lead to errors that are shown to be quite small. Out-of-plane components of displacement and traction fields can be safely neglected, and characteristic features of intercellular stresses that underlie plithotaxis remain largely unaffected. Taken together, these findings validate Monolayer Stress Microscopy within broad but well-defined limits of applicability.

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Substrate tractions for RPME cell island.(a) Island of RPME cells. (b,c) Two components of tractions,  and  respectively, applied by these cells on the substrate. Size of the cell island: 4.2 mm×2.6 mm.
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pone-0055172-g003: Substrate tractions for RPME cell island.(a) Island of RPME cells. (b,c) Two components of tractions, and respectively, applied by these cells on the substrate. Size of the cell island: 4.2 mm×2.6 mm.

Mentions: In an island of rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial (RPME) cells, tractions demonstrated extreme spatial fluctuations (, Fig. 3b; and , Fig. 3c). These fluctuations are comparable to those previously reported [22], [27]. Using these traction fields together with Eqs. 1 and 2, and assuming the monolayer elastic properties to be homogeneous and incompressible (), the resulting intercellular stress landscape demonstrated the same characteristic ruggedness as observed previously by Tambe et al. [22] (Fig. 4a–c).


Monolayer stress microscopy: limitations, artifacts, and accuracy of recovered intercellular stresses.

Tambe DT, Croutelle U, Trepat X, Park CY, Kim JH, Millet E, Butler JP, Fredberg JJ - PLoS ONE (2013)

Substrate tractions for RPME cell island.(a) Island of RPME cells. (b,c) Two components of tractions,  and  respectively, applied by these cells on the substrate. Size of the cell island: 4.2 mm×2.6 mm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3585344&req=5

pone-0055172-g003: Substrate tractions for RPME cell island.(a) Island of RPME cells. (b,c) Two components of tractions, and respectively, applied by these cells on the substrate. Size of the cell island: 4.2 mm×2.6 mm.
Mentions: In an island of rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial (RPME) cells, tractions demonstrated extreme spatial fluctuations (, Fig. 3b; and , Fig. 3c). These fluctuations are comparable to those previously reported [22], [27]. Using these traction fields together with Eqs. 1 and 2, and assuming the monolayer elastic properties to be homogeneous and incompressible (), the resulting intercellular stress landscape demonstrated the same characteristic ruggedness as observed previously by Tambe et al. [22] (Fig. 4a–c).

Bottom Line: To assess the validity of these assumptions and to quantify associated errors, here we report new analytical, numerical, and experimental investigations.For several commonly used experimental monolayer systems, the simplifying assumptions used previously lead to errors that are shown to be quite small.Out-of-plane components of displacement and traction fields can be safely neglected, and characteristic features of intercellular stresses that underlie plithotaxis remain largely unaffected.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. dhananjay@alumni.brown.edu

ABSTRACT
In wound healing, tissue growth, and certain cancers, the epithelial or the endothelial monolayer sheet expands. Within the expanding monolayer sheet, migration of the individual cell is strongly guided by physical forces imposed by adjacent cells. This process is called plithotaxis and was discovered using Monolayer Stress Microscopy (MSM). MSM rests upon certain simplifying assumptions, however, concerning boundary conditions, cell material properties and system dimensionality. To assess the validity of these assumptions and to quantify associated errors, here we report new analytical, numerical, and experimental investigations. For several commonly used experimental monolayer systems, the simplifying assumptions used previously lead to errors that are shown to be quite small. Out-of-plane components of displacement and traction fields can be safely neglected, and characteristic features of intercellular stresses that underlie plithotaxis remain largely unaffected. Taken together, these findings validate Monolayer Stress Microscopy within broad but well-defined limits of applicability.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus