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Sino-Canadian collaborations in stem cell research: a scientometric analysis.

Ali-Khan SE, Ray M, McMahon DS, Thorsteinsdóttir H - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: China-Canada collaboration enhances impact compared to papers authored solely by China-based researchers This difference remained significant even when comparing only papers published in English.Nevertheless, IC enhances the impact of stem cell research in China, and in the field in general.This study establishes an objective baseline for comparison with future studies, setting the stage for in-depth exploration of the dynamics and genesis of IC in stem cell research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: International collaboration (IC) is essential for the advance of stem cell research, a field characterized by marked asymmetries in knowledge and capacity between nations. China is emerging as a global leader in the stem cell field. However, knowledge on the extent and characteristics of IC in stem cell science, particularly China's collaboration with developed economies, is lacking.

Methods and findings: We provide a scientometric analysis of the China-Canada collaboration in stem cell research, placing this in the context of other leading producers in the field. We analyze stem cell research published from 2006 to 2010 from the Scopus database, using co-authored papers as a proxy for collaboration. We examine IC levels, collaboration preferences, scientific impact, the collaborating institutions in China and Canada, areas of mutual interest, and funding sources. Our analysis shows rapid global expansion of the field with 48% increase in papers from 2006 to 2010. China now ranks second globally after the United States. China has the lowest IC rate of countries examined, while Canada has one of the highest. China-Canada collaboration is rising steadily, more than doubling during 2006-2010. China-Canada collaboration enhances impact compared to papers authored solely by China-based researchers This difference remained significant even when comparing only papers published in English.

Conclusions: While China is increasingly courted in IC by developed countries as a partner in stem cell research, it is clear that it has reached its status in the field largely through domestic publications. Nevertheless, IC enhances the impact of stem cell research in China, and in the field in general. This study establishes an objective baseline for comparison with future studies, setting the stage for in-depth exploration of the dynamics and genesis of IC in stem cell research.

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Canada’s and China’s collaboration with their top five collaboration partners, and select others. A:Top Canada’s collaboration (collaboration with US not shown). Shown is the number of stem cell papers co-authored by Canada per year, together with its top five collaboration partners after the US (its top collaborator – data not shown); Germany, the UK, Japan, France and China, as well as for comparison - the number of co-authored papers with Australia, and emerging economies Brazil and India. B: Top China’s collaboration (collaboration with US not shown). Shown is the number of stem cell papers co-authored by China per year, in collaboration with its top five collaboration partners after the US (its top collaborator – data not shown); Japan, the UK, Hong Kong, Germany, and Canada, as well as for comparison - the number of co-authored papers with Stem Cell Network Asia Pacific (SNAP) members, Hong Kong, and emerging economies Brazil and India.
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pone-0057176-g004: Canada’s and China’s collaboration with their top five collaboration partners, and select others. A:Top Canada’s collaboration (collaboration with US not shown). Shown is the number of stem cell papers co-authored by Canada per year, together with its top five collaboration partners after the US (its top collaborator – data not shown); Germany, the UK, Japan, France and China, as well as for comparison - the number of co-authored papers with Australia, and emerging economies Brazil and India. B: Top China’s collaboration (collaboration with US not shown). Shown is the number of stem cell papers co-authored by China per year, in collaboration with its top five collaboration partners after the US (its top collaborator – data not shown); Japan, the UK, Hong Kong, Germany, and Canada, as well as for comparison - the number of co-authored papers with Stem Cell Network Asia Pacific (SNAP) members, Hong Kong, and emerging economies Brazil and India.

Mentions: We examined the top collaboration partners of Canada and China by examining more closely their co-authored papers produced between 2006–2010 (see Figures 3A, 3B and 4A, 4B). The results showed that the US was by far the top partner for both countries, showing 885 co-affiliated papers with Canada, and 901 with China over this period. For Canada, the top collaborators in terms of papers are Germany (204), the UK (191), Japan (126), France (117), China (96) and Australia (90). For China, we also examined collaboration with SNAP member countries, and with Hong Kong because of their historical, cultural and political ties. China’s top collaborators in terms of numbers of papers after the US were Japan (164), the UK (128), Hong Kong (123), Germany (100), Canada (96) and Singapore (80). Thus, Canada ranked as 6th key partner for China, and vise versa for China’s collaboration with Canada, demonstrating a relative symmetry in the emphasis the two countries place on collaboration with each other in terms of numbers of papers published. Our rankings for stem cell research papers very closely reflect China’s international collaboration partners for overall scientific publication [42]. Examining Canada’s numbers over time (Figure 4A) shows overall increased numbers of collaborative papers with most countries, notably Germany, Japan, China and the UK. Increases in the number of collaborations with these countries were 153%, 150%, 125% and 112% respectively. China (Fig. 4B) also showed increased numbers of co-affiliated papers over time with almost all countries examined, in particular with Australia (600%), Germany (363%), the US (309%), Singapore (225%), the UK (179%), and Canada (125%).


Sino-Canadian collaborations in stem cell research: a scientometric analysis.

Ali-Khan SE, Ray M, McMahon DS, Thorsteinsdóttir H - PLoS ONE (2013)

Canada’s and China’s collaboration with their top five collaboration partners, and select others. A:Top Canada’s collaboration (collaboration with US not shown). Shown is the number of stem cell papers co-authored by Canada per year, together with its top five collaboration partners after the US (its top collaborator – data not shown); Germany, the UK, Japan, France and China, as well as for comparison - the number of co-authored papers with Australia, and emerging economies Brazil and India. B: Top China’s collaboration (collaboration with US not shown). Shown is the number of stem cell papers co-authored by China per year, in collaboration with its top five collaboration partners after the US (its top collaborator – data not shown); Japan, the UK, Hong Kong, Germany, and Canada, as well as for comparison - the number of co-authored papers with Stem Cell Network Asia Pacific (SNAP) members, Hong Kong, and emerging economies Brazil and India.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3585304&req=5

pone-0057176-g004: Canada’s and China’s collaboration with their top five collaboration partners, and select others. A:Top Canada’s collaboration (collaboration with US not shown). Shown is the number of stem cell papers co-authored by Canada per year, together with its top five collaboration partners after the US (its top collaborator – data not shown); Germany, the UK, Japan, France and China, as well as for comparison - the number of co-authored papers with Australia, and emerging economies Brazil and India. B: Top China’s collaboration (collaboration with US not shown). Shown is the number of stem cell papers co-authored by China per year, in collaboration with its top five collaboration partners after the US (its top collaborator – data not shown); Japan, the UK, Hong Kong, Germany, and Canada, as well as for comparison - the number of co-authored papers with Stem Cell Network Asia Pacific (SNAP) members, Hong Kong, and emerging economies Brazil and India.
Mentions: We examined the top collaboration partners of Canada and China by examining more closely their co-authored papers produced between 2006–2010 (see Figures 3A, 3B and 4A, 4B). The results showed that the US was by far the top partner for both countries, showing 885 co-affiliated papers with Canada, and 901 with China over this period. For Canada, the top collaborators in terms of papers are Germany (204), the UK (191), Japan (126), France (117), China (96) and Australia (90). For China, we also examined collaboration with SNAP member countries, and with Hong Kong because of their historical, cultural and political ties. China’s top collaborators in terms of numbers of papers after the US were Japan (164), the UK (128), Hong Kong (123), Germany (100), Canada (96) and Singapore (80). Thus, Canada ranked as 6th key partner for China, and vise versa for China’s collaboration with Canada, demonstrating a relative symmetry in the emphasis the two countries place on collaboration with each other in terms of numbers of papers published. Our rankings for stem cell research papers very closely reflect China’s international collaboration partners for overall scientific publication [42]. Examining Canada’s numbers over time (Figure 4A) shows overall increased numbers of collaborative papers with most countries, notably Germany, Japan, China and the UK. Increases in the number of collaborations with these countries were 153%, 150%, 125% and 112% respectively. China (Fig. 4B) also showed increased numbers of co-affiliated papers over time with almost all countries examined, in particular with Australia (600%), Germany (363%), the US (309%), Singapore (225%), the UK (179%), and Canada (125%).

Bottom Line: China-Canada collaboration enhances impact compared to papers authored solely by China-based researchers This difference remained significant even when comparing only papers published in English.Nevertheless, IC enhances the impact of stem cell research in China, and in the field in general.This study establishes an objective baseline for comparison with future studies, setting the stage for in-depth exploration of the dynamics and genesis of IC in stem cell research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: International collaboration (IC) is essential for the advance of stem cell research, a field characterized by marked asymmetries in knowledge and capacity between nations. China is emerging as a global leader in the stem cell field. However, knowledge on the extent and characteristics of IC in stem cell science, particularly China's collaboration with developed economies, is lacking.

Methods and findings: We provide a scientometric analysis of the China-Canada collaboration in stem cell research, placing this in the context of other leading producers in the field. We analyze stem cell research published from 2006 to 2010 from the Scopus database, using co-authored papers as a proxy for collaboration. We examine IC levels, collaboration preferences, scientific impact, the collaborating institutions in China and Canada, areas of mutual interest, and funding sources. Our analysis shows rapid global expansion of the field with 48% increase in papers from 2006 to 2010. China now ranks second globally after the United States. China has the lowest IC rate of countries examined, while Canada has one of the highest. China-Canada collaboration is rising steadily, more than doubling during 2006-2010. China-Canada collaboration enhances impact compared to papers authored solely by China-based researchers This difference remained significant even when comparing only papers published in English.

Conclusions: While China is increasingly courted in IC by developed countries as a partner in stem cell research, it is clear that it has reached its status in the field largely through domestic publications. Nevertheless, IC enhances the impact of stem cell research in China, and in the field in general. This study establishes an objective baseline for comparison with future studies, setting the stage for in-depth exploration of the dynamics and genesis of IC in stem cell research.

Show MeSH