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The origin of circulating CD36 in type 2 diabetes.

Alkhatatbeh MJ, Enjeti AK, Acharya S, Thorne RF, Lincz LF - Nutr Diabetes (2013)

Bottom Line: CD36+MP levels were significantly higher in obese people with T2DM (P<0.00001) and were primarily derived from erythrocytes (CD235a+=35.8±14.6%); although this did not correlate with haemoglobin A(1c).Across the entire cohort, plasma CD36 protein concentration varied from undetectable to 22.9 μg ml(-1) and was positively correlated with CD36+MPs measured by flow cytometry (P=0.0006) but only weakly associated with the distribution of controls and T2DM (P=0.021).Multivariate analysis confirmed that plasma CD36+MP levels were a much better biomarker for diabetes than CD36 protein concentration (P=0.009 vs P=0.398, respectively).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Cancer Research Unit, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health, the University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia [2] Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton, NSW, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Elevated plasma levels of the fatty acid transporter, CD36, have been shown to constitute a novel biomarker for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We recently reported such circulating CD36 to be entirely associated with cellular microparticles (MPs) and aim here to determine the absolute levels and cellular origin(s) of these CD36+MPs in persons with T2DM.

Design: An ex vivo case-control study was conducted using plasma samples from 33 obese individuals with T2DM (body mass index (BMI)=39.9±6.4 kg m(-2); age=57±9 years; 18 male:15 female) and age- and gender-matched lean and obese non-T2DM controls (BMI=23.6±1.8 kg m(-2) and 33.5±5.9 kg m(-2), respectively). Flow cytometry was used to analyse surface expression of CD36 together with tissue-specific markers: CD41, CD235a, CD14, CD105 and phosphatidyl serine on plasma MPs. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to quantify absolute CD36 protein concentrations.

Results: CD36+MP levels were significantly higher in obese people with T2DM (P<0.00001) and were primarily derived from erythrocytes (CD235a+=35.8±14.6%); although this did not correlate with haemoglobin A(1c). By contrast, the main source of CD36+MPs in non-T2DM individuals was endothelial cells (CD105+=40.9±8.3% and 33.9±8.3% for lean and obese controls, respectively). Across the entire cohort, plasma CD36 protein concentration varied from undetectable to 22.9 μg ml(-1) and was positively correlated with CD36+MPs measured by flow cytometry (P=0.0006) but only weakly associated with the distribution of controls and T2DM (P=0.021). Multivariate analysis confirmed that plasma CD36+MP levels were a much better biomarker for diabetes than CD36 protein concentration (P=0.009 vs P=0.398, respectively).

Conclusions: Both the levels and cellular profile of CD36+MPs differ in T2DM compared with controls, suggesting that these specific vesicles could represent distinct biological vectors contributing to the pathology of the disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of CD36+MP derived from specific MP subsets in lean controls, obese controls and obese T2DM individuals. Data expressed as mean and s.ds. +P<0.05, ++P<0.01 vs lean controls; **P<0.001, ***P<0.00001 vs obese controls.
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fig2: Percentage of CD36+MP derived from specific MP subsets in lean controls, obese controls and obese T2DM individuals. Data expressed as mean and s.ds. +P<0.05, ++P<0.01 vs lean controls; **P<0.001, ***P<0.00001 vs obese controls.

Mentions: During the course of multicolour flow cytometry analysis for individual MP subsets, it became clear that the majority of circulating CD36+MPs co-expressed other markers being investigated. In an effort to determine the primary origin of these CD36+MPs, the percentage expressing each of the analysed markers was calculated. As illustrated in Figure 2, the primary source of CD36+MPs in obese T2DM individuals was from erythrocytes (35.8±14.6%), occurring at levels that were significantly greater than in obese controls (22.2±9.0% P<0.00001). By contrast, the main source of CD36+MPs in non-diabetic individuals was endothelial cells (40.9±8.3% and 33.9±8.3% for lean and obese controls, respectively) followed closely by platelets (16.8±8.3% and 23.8±12.0%). Overall, only the subset of CD36+MPs expressing PS was specifically increased in diabetes, while an increase in the percentage of CD36+MPs derived from platelets was specific to obesity and an increase in erythrocyte-derived CD36+MPs was common to both conditions, albeit highest in diabetes.


The origin of circulating CD36 in type 2 diabetes.

Alkhatatbeh MJ, Enjeti AK, Acharya S, Thorne RF, Lincz LF - Nutr Diabetes (2013)

Percentage of CD36+MP derived from specific MP subsets in lean controls, obese controls and obese T2DM individuals. Data expressed as mean and s.ds. +P<0.05, ++P<0.01 vs lean controls; **P<0.001, ***P<0.00001 vs obese controls.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3584987&req=5

fig2: Percentage of CD36+MP derived from specific MP subsets in lean controls, obese controls and obese T2DM individuals. Data expressed as mean and s.ds. +P<0.05, ++P<0.01 vs lean controls; **P<0.001, ***P<0.00001 vs obese controls.
Mentions: During the course of multicolour flow cytometry analysis for individual MP subsets, it became clear that the majority of circulating CD36+MPs co-expressed other markers being investigated. In an effort to determine the primary origin of these CD36+MPs, the percentage expressing each of the analysed markers was calculated. As illustrated in Figure 2, the primary source of CD36+MPs in obese T2DM individuals was from erythrocytes (35.8±14.6%), occurring at levels that were significantly greater than in obese controls (22.2±9.0% P<0.00001). By contrast, the main source of CD36+MPs in non-diabetic individuals was endothelial cells (40.9±8.3% and 33.9±8.3% for lean and obese controls, respectively) followed closely by platelets (16.8±8.3% and 23.8±12.0%). Overall, only the subset of CD36+MPs expressing PS was specifically increased in diabetes, while an increase in the percentage of CD36+MPs derived from platelets was specific to obesity and an increase in erythrocyte-derived CD36+MPs was common to both conditions, albeit highest in diabetes.

Bottom Line: CD36+MP levels were significantly higher in obese people with T2DM (P<0.00001) and were primarily derived from erythrocytes (CD235a+=35.8±14.6%); although this did not correlate with haemoglobin A(1c).Across the entire cohort, plasma CD36 protein concentration varied from undetectable to 22.9 μg ml(-1) and was positively correlated with CD36+MPs measured by flow cytometry (P=0.0006) but only weakly associated with the distribution of controls and T2DM (P=0.021).Multivariate analysis confirmed that plasma CD36+MP levels were a much better biomarker for diabetes than CD36 protein concentration (P=0.009 vs P=0.398, respectively).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Cancer Research Unit, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health, the University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia [2] Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton, NSW, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Elevated plasma levels of the fatty acid transporter, CD36, have been shown to constitute a novel biomarker for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We recently reported such circulating CD36 to be entirely associated with cellular microparticles (MPs) and aim here to determine the absolute levels and cellular origin(s) of these CD36+MPs in persons with T2DM.

Design: An ex vivo case-control study was conducted using plasma samples from 33 obese individuals with T2DM (body mass index (BMI)=39.9±6.4 kg m(-2); age=57±9 years; 18 male:15 female) and age- and gender-matched lean and obese non-T2DM controls (BMI=23.6±1.8 kg m(-2) and 33.5±5.9 kg m(-2), respectively). Flow cytometry was used to analyse surface expression of CD36 together with tissue-specific markers: CD41, CD235a, CD14, CD105 and phosphatidyl serine on plasma MPs. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to quantify absolute CD36 protein concentrations.

Results: CD36+MP levels were significantly higher in obese people with T2DM (P<0.00001) and were primarily derived from erythrocytes (CD235a+=35.8±14.6%); although this did not correlate with haemoglobin A(1c). By contrast, the main source of CD36+MPs in non-T2DM individuals was endothelial cells (CD105+=40.9±8.3% and 33.9±8.3% for lean and obese controls, respectively). Across the entire cohort, plasma CD36 protein concentration varied from undetectable to 22.9 μg ml(-1) and was positively correlated with CD36+MPs measured by flow cytometry (P=0.0006) but only weakly associated with the distribution of controls and T2DM (P=0.021). Multivariate analysis confirmed that plasma CD36+MP levels were a much better biomarker for diabetes than CD36 protein concentration (P=0.009 vs P=0.398, respectively).

Conclusions: Both the levels and cellular profile of CD36+MPs differ in T2DM compared with controls, suggesting that these specific vesicles could represent distinct biological vectors contributing to the pathology of the disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus