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Suicide prevention for youth--a mental health awareness program: lessons learned from the Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE) intervention study.

Wasserman C, Hoven CW, Wasserman D, Carli V, Sarchiapone M, Al-Halabí S, Apter A, Balazs J, Bobes J, Cosman D, Farkas L, Feldman D, Fischer G, Graber N, Haring C, Herta DC, Iosue M, Kahn JP, Keeley H, Klug K, McCarthy J, Tubiana-Potiez A, Varnik A, Varnik P, Ziberna J, Poštuvan V - BMC Public Health (2012)

Bottom Line: The results show that the program cultivated peer understanding and support.Recommendations for enhancing the successes of mental health awareness programs are presented.Help and cooperation from schools, teachers, local politicians and other stakeholders will lead to more efficacious future programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Columbia University-New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA. wassermc@childpsych.columbia.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: The Awareness program was designed as a part of the EU-funded Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE) intervention study to promote mental health of adolescents in 11 European countries by helping them to develop problem-solving skills and encouraging them to self-recognize the need for help as well as how to help peers in need.

Methods: For this descriptive study all coordinators of the SEYLE Awareness program answered an open-ended evaluation questionnaire at the end of the project implementation. Their answers were synthesized and analyzed and are presented here.

Results: The results show that the program cultivated peer understanding and support. Adolescents not only learned about mental health by participating in the Awareness program, but the majority of them also greatly enjoyed the experience.

Conclusions: Recommendations for enhancing the successes of mental health awareness programs are presented. Help and cooperation from schools, teachers, local politicians and other stakeholders will lead to more efficacious future programs.

Show MeSH
Proposed modifications of the awareness program. Due to the fact that the Awareness coordinators responses were compiled into theme clusters the charts show the number of compiled responses and not the percentage of responses.
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Figure 4: Proposed modifications of the awareness program. Due to the fact that the Awareness coordinators responses were compiled into theme clusters the charts show the number of compiled responses and not the percentage of responses.

Mentions: The most important aspects that the coordinators wish to change in the program are shown in Figure 4 below. Many of them mention the short time frame of the program and the value of a more flexible schedule, as well as the advantage of a less rigid approach to the dissemination of content, expressing some reservation regarding the structure of the opening lecture and the somewhat intrusive posters. Instructors and students alike expressed the desire for an Awareness program that would last longer (Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Slovenia, and Spain), and for the structure of the program to be changed to two longer workshops, instead of three shorter ones (Estonia). Additionally, a wish to address other topics was expressed by the coordinators, such as: sexual behavior (Slovenia), sexual orientation (France), influence of emotions and thoughts on behavior (Romania), practice with behavioral techniques about how to talk to peers in distress (Hungary).


Suicide prevention for youth--a mental health awareness program: lessons learned from the Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE) intervention study.

Wasserman C, Hoven CW, Wasserman D, Carli V, Sarchiapone M, Al-Halabí S, Apter A, Balazs J, Bobes J, Cosman D, Farkas L, Feldman D, Fischer G, Graber N, Haring C, Herta DC, Iosue M, Kahn JP, Keeley H, Klug K, McCarthy J, Tubiana-Potiez A, Varnik A, Varnik P, Ziberna J, Poštuvan V - BMC Public Health (2012)

Proposed modifications of the awareness program. Due to the fact that the Awareness coordinators responses were compiled into theme clusters the charts show the number of compiled responses and not the percentage of responses.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3584983&req=5

Figure 4: Proposed modifications of the awareness program. Due to the fact that the Awareness coordinators responses were compiled into theme clusters the charts show the number of compiled responses and not the percentage of responses.
Mentions: The most important aspects that the coordinators wish to change in the program are shown in Figure 4 below. Many of them mention the short time frame of the program and the value of a more flexible schedule, as well as the advantage of a less rigid approach to the dissemination of content, expressing some reservation regarding the structure of the opening lecture and the somewhat intrusive posters. Instructors and students alike expressed the desire for an Awareness program that would last longer (Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Slovenia, and Spain), and for the structure of the program to be changed to two longer workshops, instead of three shorter ones (Estonia). Additionally, a wish to address other topics was expressed by the coordinators, such as: sexual behavior (Slovenia), sexual orientation (France), influence of emotions and thoughts on behavior (Romania), practice with behavioral techniques about how to talk to peers in distress (Hungary).

Bottom Line: The results show that the program cultivated peer understanding and support.Recommendations for enhancing the successes of mental health awareness programs are presented.Help and cooperation from schools, teachers, local politicians and other stakeholders will lead to more efficacious future programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Columbia University-New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA. wassermc@childpsych.columbia.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: The Awareness program was designed as a part of the EU-funded Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE) intervention study to promote mental health of adolescents in 11 European countries by helping them to develop problem-solving skills and encouraging them to self-recognize the need for help as well as how to help peers in need.

Methods: For this descriptive study all coordinators of the SEYLE Awareness program answered an open-ended evaluation questionnaire at the end of the project implementation. Their answers were synthesized and analyzed and are presented here.

Results: The results show that the program cultivated peer understanding and support. Adolescents not only learned about mental health by participating in the Awareness program, but the majority of them also greatly enjoyed the experience.

Conclusions: Recommendations for enhancing the successes of mental health awareness programs are presented. Help and cooperation from schools, teachers, local politicians and other stakeholders will lead to more efficacious future programs.

Show MeSH