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A review on JC virus infection in kidney transplant recipients.

Delbue S, Ferraresso M, Ghio L, Carloni C, Carluccio S, Belingheri M, Edefonti A, Ferrante P - Clin. Dev. Immunol. (2013)

Bottom Line: The polyomavirus (PyV), JC virus (JCV), is a small nonenveloped DNA virus that asymptomatically infects about 80% of healthy adults and establishes latency in the kidney tissue.In case of immunodeficient hosts, JCV can lytically infect the oligodendrocytes, causing a fatal demyelinating disease, known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML).Here we describe the biology of JCV and its pathological features and we review the literature regarding the JCV infection analyzed in the setting of transplantations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Translational Research, Health Science Foundation "Ettore Sansavini", Corso Garibaldi 11, 48022 Lugo, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The polyomavirus (PyV), JC virus (JCV), is a small nonenveloped DNA virus that asymptomatically infects about 80% of healthy adults and establishes latency in the kidney tissue. In case of immunodeficient hosts, JCV can lytically infect the oligodendrocytes, causing a fatal demyelinating disease, known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Although the reactivation of another human PyV, BK virus (BKV), is relatively common and its association with the polyomavirus associated nephropathy (PyVAN) following renal transplantation is proven, JCV replication and its impact on graft function and survival are less well studied. Here we describe the biology of JCV and its pathological features and we review the literature regarding the JCV infection analyzed in the setting of transplantations.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic representation of the JCV genome organization. The circular, double-stranded DNA genome is ~5.2 kb in size and is divided into the early coding region and the late coding region, transcribed in opposite directions from a common noncoding control region (NCCR). Early genes include large T antigen (T-Ag), small t antigen (t-Ag), T′135, T′136, and T′165. Late genes include VP1, VP2, VP3, and agnoprotein.
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fig1: Schematic representation of the JCV genome organization. The circular, double-stranded DNA genome is ~5.2 kb in size and is divided into the early coding region and the late coding region, transcribed in opposite directions from a common noncoding control region (NCCR). Early genes include large T antigen (T-Ag), small t antigen (t-Ag), T′135, T′136, and T′165. Late genes include VP1, VP2, VP3, and agnoprotein.

Mentions: The late coding region spans 2.3 kb and encodes the capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 by alternative splicing of a common mRNA derived from the same primary late transcript and a small regulatory protein, known as agnoprotein, whose function in the virus life cycle is not completely clear [5] (Figure 1).


A review on JC virus infection in kidney transplant recipients.

Delbue S, Ferraresso M, Ghio L, Carloni C, Carluccio S, Belingheri M, Edefonti A, Ferrante P - Clin. Dev. Immunol. (2013)

Schematic representation of the JCV genome organization. The circular, double-stranded DNA genome is ~5.2 kb in size and is divided into the early coding region and the late coding region, transcribed in opposite directions from a common noncoding control region (NCCR). Early genes include large T antigen (T-Ag), small t antigen (t-Ag), T′135, T′136, and T′165. Late genes include VP1, VP2, VP3, and agnoprotein.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569895&req=5

fig1: Schematic representation of the JCV genome organization. The circular, double-stranded DNA genome is ~5.2 kb in size and is divided into the early coding region and the late coding region, transcribed in opposite directions from a common noncoding control region (NCCR). Early genes include large T antigen (T-Ag), small t antigen (t-Ag), T′135, T′136, and T′165. Late genes include VP1, VP2, VP3, and agnoprotein.
Mentions: The late coding region spans 2.3 kb and encodes the capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 by alternative splicing of a common mRNA derived from the same primary late transcript and a small regulatory protein, known as agnoprotein, whose function in the virus life cycle is not completely clear [5] (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: The polyomavirus (PyV), JC virus (JCV), is a small nonenveloped DNA virus that asymptomatically infects about 80% of healthy adults and establishes latency in the kidney tissue.In case of immunodeficient hosts, JCV can lytically infect the oligodendrocytes, causing a fatal demyelinating disease, known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML).Here we describe the biology of JCV and its pathological features and we review the literature regarding the JCV infection analyzed in the setting of transplantations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Translational Research, Health Science Foundation "Ettore Sansavini", Corso Garibaldi 11, 48022 Lugo, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The polyomavirus (PyV), JC virus (JCV), is a small nonenveloped DNA virus that asymptomatically infects about 80% of healthy adults and establishes latency in the kidney tissue. In case of immunodeficient hosts, JCV can lytically infect the oligodendrocytes, causing a fatal demyelinating disease, known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Although the reactivation of another human PyV, BK virus (BKV), is relatively common and its association with the polyomavirus associated nephropathy (PyVAN) following renal transplantation is proven, JCV replication and its impact on graft function and survival are less well studied. Here we describe the biology of JCV and its pathological features and we review the literature regarding the JCV infection analyzed in the setting of transplantations.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus