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The effects of integrative in-patient treatment on patients' quality of life: a meta-analysis.

Ostermann T, Langhorst J, Beer AM - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2013)

Bottom Line: Results.I(2) statistics indicate a high heterogeneity in the effects in both the physical and mental scores of the SF-36 (I(2) = 91.8%, P < 0.001, resp.; I(2) = 86.7%, P < 0.001).Discussion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center of Integrative Medicine, Witten/Herdecke University, Gerhard-Kienle-Weg 4, 58313 Herdecke, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Background. In the last decades, several hospitals have adopted this concept of integrative medicine for the treatment of chronic and acute states of illnesses in in-patient treatment. The aim of this paper was to summarize the current evidence for a possible effectiveness of integrative on-patient treatment in patients' quality of life by means of a meta-analysis. Material and Methods. The databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, PsycInfo, PsycLit CCMED, and CAMbase were screened to find articles. We also screened publisher databases to find relevant information. Articles were included if patients were treated in a hospital. To guarantee comparability SF-36 was the predefined outcome measure for patients' quality of life. Data of pre/posteffects on the mental and physical scores of the SF-36 were extracted and effect sizes were calculated and entered into a random effect meta-analysis. Results. Eight articles published between 2003 and 2010 were included in the final meta-analysis. Random effect meta-analysis of the eight studies revealed an overall effect size of 0.37 (95% CI: [0.28; 0.45]) in the physical score and 0.38 (95% CI: [0.30; 0.45]) in the mental score of the SF-36. I(2) statistics indicate a high heterogeneity in the effects in both the physical and mental scores of the SF-36 (I(2) = 91.8%, P < 0.001, resp.; I(2) = 86.7%, P < 0.001). Discussion. This meta-analysis might help to rediscover the importance of integrative in-patient treatment for patients, physicians, and stakeholders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Forest plot of the effect sizes for SF-36 “mental component.”
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fig3: Forest plot of the effect sizes for SF-36 “mental component.”

Mentions: In the mental dimension the lower bound lower bound of effect sizes is identical to the physical dimension (d = 0.16 in the study of Stange et al. [26]). However the upper bound sees remarkably higher effects of d = 0.56 in the study of Buchner et al. and d = 0.69 in the study of Wiebelitz et al. [25] (Figure 3).


The effects of integrative in-patient treatment on patients' quality of life: a meta-analysis.

Ostermann T, Langhorst J, Beer AM - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2013)

Forest plot of the effect sizes for SF-36 “mental component.”
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569887&req=5

fig3: Forest plot of the effect sizes for SF-36 “mental component.”
Mentions: In the mental dimension the lower bound lower bound of effect sizes is identical to the physical dimension (d = 0.16 in the study of Stange et al. [26]). However the upper bound sees remarkably higher effects of d = 0.56 in the study of Buchner et al. and d = 0.69 in the study of Wiebelitz et al. [25] (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Results.I(2) statistics indicate a high heterogeneity in the effects in both the physical and mental scores of the SF-36 (I(2) = 91.8%, P < 0.001, resp.; I(2) = 86.7%, P < 0.001).Discussion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center of Integrative Medicine, Witten/Herdecke University, Gerhard-Kienle-Weg 4, 58313 Herdecke, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Background. In the last decades, several hospitals have adopted this concept of integrative medicine for the treatment of chronic and acute states of illnesses in in-patient treatment. The aim of this paper was to summarize the current evidence for a possible effectiveness of integrative on-patient treatment in patients' quality of life by means of a meta-analysis. Material and Methods. The databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, PsycInfo, PsycLit CCMED, and CAMbase were screened to find articles. We also screened publisher databases to find relevant information. Articles were included if patients were treated in a hospital. To guarantee comparability SF-36 was the predefined outcome measure for patients' quality of life. Data of pre/posteffects on the mental and physical scores of the SF-36 were extracted and effect sizes were calculated and entered into a random effect meta-analysis. Results. Eight articles published between 2003 and 2010 were included in the final meta-analysis. Random effect meta-analysis of the eight studies revealed an overall effect size of 0.37 (95% CI: [0.28; 0.45]) in the physical score and 0.38 (95% CI: [0.30; 0.45]) in the mental score of the SF-36. I(2) statistics indicate a high heterogeneity in the effects in both the physical and mental scores of the SF-36 (I(2) = 91.8%, P < 0.001, resp.; I(2) = 86.7%, P < 0.001). Discussion. This meta-analysis might help to rediscover the importance of integrative in-patient treatment for patients, physicians, and stakeholders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus