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Road traffic noise and diabetes: long-term exposure may increase disease risk.

Nicole W - Environ. Health Perspect. (2013)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

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Noise is an environmental stressor that stimulates the body’s sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal axis, leading to increased blood pressure, heart rate, and levels of the “stress hormone” cortisol... Past research has associated exposure to traffic noise with cardiovascular disease, and the mechanisms of action hypothesized to underlie this association suggest that noise may also increase diabetes risk... Investigators now report that long-term exposure to residential road traffic noise was, in fact, associated with increased diabetes incidence in a Danish cohort [EHP 121(2):217–222; Sørensen et al.]... Glucocorticoid hormones, a group that includes cortisol, inhibit insulin secretion and reduce sensitivity to insulin by the liver, muscle, and fat tissue... Studies have linked sleep disturbances to low morning glucose levels, reduced insulin sensitivity, and changes in appetite regulation... Of the 50,187 eligible participants, there were 3,869 cases of incident diabetes available for the analysis... The investigators did not distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes... When the investigators applied the stricter definition of diabetes, they found an 11% increase in risk per 10-decibel increase in road traffic noise at the current residence, increasing to 14% when based on the previous 5 years... These associations held after adjusting for traffic pollution... There was no association between railway noise and diabetes... The investigators conclude that reducing urban noise could improve population health, and specifically reduce the risk of diabetes... Future studies should seek to confirm the relationship between noise exposure and diabetes, and determine how traffic noise and air pollution interact to influence the risk of this disease.

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Vesterbrogade Street, Copenhagen, Denmark. Findings from a Danish cohort suggest exposure to road traffic noise may put residents at risk for diabetes.© Rune Johansen/Getty Images
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f1: Vesterbrogade Street, Copenhagen, Denmark. Findings from a Danish cohort suggest exposure to road traffic noise may put residents at risk for diabetes.© Rune Johansen/Getty Images


Road traffic noise and diabetes: long-term exposure may increase disease risk.

Nicole W - Environ. Health Perspect. (2013)

Vesterbrogade Street, Copenhagen, Denmark. Findings from a Danish cohort suggest exposure to road traffic noise may put residents at risk for diabetes.© Rune Johansen/Getty Images
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569704&req=5

f1: Vesterbrogade Street, Copenhagen, Denmark. Findings from a Danish cohort suggest exposure to road traffic noise may put residents at risk for diabetes.© Rune Johansen/Getty Images

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Noise is an environmental stressor that stimulates the body’s sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal axis, leading to increased blood pressure, heart rate, and levels of the “stress hormone” cortisol... Past research has associated exposure to traffic noise with cardiovascular disease, and the mechanisms of action hypothesized to underlie this association suggest that noise may also increase diabetes risk... Investigators now report that long-term exposure to residential road traffic noise was, in fact, associated with increased diabetes incidence in a Danish cohort [EHP 121(2):217–222; Sørensen et al.]... Glucocorticoid hormones, a group that includes cortisol, inhibit insulin secretion and reduce sensitivity to insulin by the liver, muscle, and fat tissue... Studies have linked sleep disturbances to low morning glucose levels, reduced insulin sensitivity, and changes in appetite regulation... Of the 50,187 eligible participants, there were 3,869 cases of incident diabetes available for the analysis... The investigators did not distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes... When the investigators applied the stricter definition of diabetes, they found an 11% increase in risk per 10-decibel increase in road traffic noise at the current residence, increasing to 14% when based on the previous 5 years... These associations held after adjusting for traffic pollution... There was no association between railway noise and diabetes... The investigators conclude that reducing urban noise could improve population health, and specifically reduce the risk of diabetes... Future studies should seek to confirm the relationship between noise exposure and diabetes, and determine how traffic noise and air pollution interact to influence the risk of this disease.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus