Limits...
Imaging of multifocal liver lesions in children and adolescents.

Hegde SV, Dillman JR, Lopez MJ, Strouse PJ - Cancer Imaging (2013)

Bottom Line: Multifocal liver lesions are encountered regularly in children and adolescents.By knowing the specific ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of benign and malignant pediatric liver lesions as well as the particular clinical setting, radiologists can frequently narrow the differential diagnosis and sometimes offer a definitive diagnosis.The purpose of this review article is to illustrate the imaging findings of numerous benign and malignant causes of multifocal liver lesions in the pediatric population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

ABSTRACT
Multifocal liver lesions are encountered regularly in children and adolescents. By knowing the specific ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of benign and malignant pediatric liver lesions as well as the particular clinical setting, radiologists can frequently narrow the differential diagnosis and sometimes offer a definitive diagnosis. The purpose of this review article is to illustrate the imaging findings of numerous benign and malignant causes of multifocal liver lesions in the pediatric population.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

A 3-year-old girl with extranodal diffuse large B-cell primary lymphoma of the liver and kidneys. (a,b) Axial T1-weighted GRE in-phase and T2-weighted fast spin echo fat-saturated MR images demonstrate countless small round masses replacing almost the entire liver. The liver is diffusely enlarged. (c) Axial T1-weighted three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled fat-saturated postcontrast MR image shows variable enhancement of the liver lesions with some appearing hypointense and others appearing isointense. A few lesions also peripherally enhance. Multiple bilateral renal lesions are also due to lymphoma.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569672&req=5

Figure 14: A 3-year-old girl with extranodal diffuse large B-cell primary lymphoma of the liver and kidneys. (a,b) Axial T1-weighted GRE in-phase and T2-weighted fast spin echo fat-saturated MR images demonstrate countless small round masses replacing almost the entire liver. The liver is diffusely enlarged. (c) Axial T1-weighted three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled fat-saturated postcontrast MR image shows variable enhancement of the liver lesions with some appearing hypointense and others appearing isointense. A few lesions also peripherally enhance. Multiple bilateral renal lesions are also due to lymphoma.

Mentions: On imaging, primary hepatic lymphomas can be solitary or multifocal, whereas secondary hepatic lymphomas most often present as multiple discrete non-specific lesions, sometimes mimicking metastases[32,34,35]. On ultrasonography, hepatic lymphoma is typically hypoechoic[34,35]. Hepatic lymphomatous deposits demonstrate variable postcontrast enhancement on CT and MRI, including occasional peripheral enhancement (Fig. 14)[32,35].Figure 14


Imaging of multifocal liver lesions in children and adolescents.

Hegde SV, Dillman JR, Lopez MJ, Strouse PJ - Cancer Imaging (2013)

A 3-year-old girl with extranodal diffuse large B-cell primary lymphoma of the liver and kidneys. (a,b) Axial T1-weighted GRE in-phase and T2-weighted fast spin echo fat-saturated MR images demonstrate countless small round masses replacing almost the entire liver. The liver is diffusely enlarged. (c) Axial T1-weighted three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled fat-saturated postcontrast MR image shows variable enhancement of the liver lesions with some appearing hypointense and others appearing isointense. A few lesions also peripherally enhance. Multiple bilateral renal lesions are also due to lymphoma.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569672&req=5

Figure 14: A 3-year-old girl with extranodal diffuse large B-cell primary lymphoma of the liver and kidneys. (a,b) Axial T1-weighted GRE in-phase and T2-weighted fast spin echo fat-saturated MR images demonstrate countless small round masses replacing almost the entire liver. The liver is diffusely enlarged. (c) Axial T1-weighted three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled fat-saturated postcontrast MR image shows variable enhancement of the liver lesions with some appearing hypointense and others appearing isointense. A few lesions also peripherally enhance. Multiple bilateral renal lesions are also due to lymphoma.
Mentions: On imaging, primary hepatic lymphomas can be solitary or multifocal, whereas secondary hepatic lymphomas most often present as multiple discrete non-specific lesions, sometimes mimicking metastases[32,34,35]. On ultrasonography, hepatic lymphoma is typically hypoechoic[34,35]. Hepatic lymphomatous deposits demonstrate variable postcontrast enhancement on CT and MRI, including occasional peripheral enhancement (Fig. 14)[32,35].Figure 14

Bottom Line: Multifocal liver lesions are encountered regularly in children and adolescents.By knowing the specific ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of benign and malignant pediatric liver lesions as well as the particular clinical setting, radiologists can frequently narrow the differential diagnosis and sometimes offer a definitive diagnosis.The purpose of this review article is to illustrate the imaging findings of numerous benign and malignant causes of multifocal liver lesions in the pediatric population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

ABSTRACT
Multifocal liver lesions are encountered regularly in children and adolescents. By knowing the specific ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of benign and malignant pediatric liver lesions as well as the particular clinical setting, radiologists can frequently narrow the differential diagnosis and sometimes offer a definitive diagnosis. The purpose of this review article is to illustrate the imaging findings of numerous benign and malignant causes of multifocal liver lesions in the pediatric population.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus