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Imaging of multifocal liver lesions in children and adolescents.

Hegde SV, Dillman JR, Lopez MJ, Strouse PJ - Cancer Imaging (2013)

Bottom Line: Multifocal liver lesions are encountered regularly in children and adolescents.By knowing the specific ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of benign and malignant pediatric liver lesions as well as the particular clinical setting, radiologists can frequently narrow the differential diagnosis and sometimes offer a definitive diagnosis.The purpose of this review article is to illustrate the imaging findings of numerous benign and malignant causes of multifocal liver lesions in the pediatric population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

ABSTRACT
Multifocal liver lesions are encountered regularly in children and adolescents. By knowing the specific ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of benign and malignant pediatric liver lesions as well as the particular clinical setting, radiologists can frequently narrow the differential diagnosis and sometimes offer a definitive diagnosis. The purpose of this review article is to illustrate the imaging findings of numerous benign and malignant causes of multifocal liver lesions in the pediatric population.

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A 10-year-old boy with Down syndrome, acute leukemia, and systemic candidiasis. (a) Axial CT image shows multiple non-specific small round low attenuation liver lesions. (b) Longitudinal greyscale ultrasound image shows multiple target lesions (arrows) within the liver, consistent with fungal abscesses.
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Figure 8: A 10-year-old boy with Down syndrome, acute leukemia, and systemic candidiasis. (a) Axial CT image shows multiple non-specific small round low attenuation liver lesions. (b) Longitudinal greyscale ultrasound image shows multiple target lesions (arrows) within the liver, consistent with fungal abscesses.

Mentions: On ultrasonography, fungal abscesses (or microabscesses) most commonly present as multiple small (<1–2 cm) round hypoechoic liver and splenic lesions[14]. With time and normalization of the patient’s white blood cell count, a target or bull’s eye appearance (echogenic center and hypoechoic rim) can develop that is usually pathognomonic for fungal infection in the appropriate clinical setting (Fig. 8)[14]. On CT and MRI, fungal liver abscesses typically present as multiple small non-specific lesions with variable enhancement[14]. In particular, MRI may be useful for attempting to differentiate acute, subacute treated, and chronic healed fungal disease within the liver[16].Figure 8


Imaging of multifocal liver lesions in children and adolescents.

Hegde SV, Dillman JR, Lopez MJ, Strouse PJ - Cancer Imaging (2013)

A 10-year-old boy with Down syndrome, acute leukemia, and systemic candidiasis. (a) Axial CT image shows multiple non-specific small round low attenuation liver lesions. (b) Longitudinal greyscale ultrasound image shows multiple target lesions (arrows) within the liver, consistent with fungal abscesses.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569672&req=5

Figure 8: A 10-year-old boy with Down syndrome, acute leukemia, and systemic candidiasis. (a) Axial CT image shows multiple non-specific small round low attenuation liver lesions. (b) Longitudinal greyscale ultrasound image shows multiple target lesions (arrows) within the liver, consistent with fungal abscesses.
Mentions: On ultrasonography, fungal abscesses (or microabscesses) most commonly present as multiple small (<1–2 cm) round hypoechoic liver and splenic lesions[14]. With time and normalization of the patient’s white blood cell count, a target or bull’s eye appearance (echogenic center and hypoechoic rim) can develop that is usually pathognomonic for fungal infection in the appropriate clinical setting (Fig. 8)[14]. On CT and MRI, fungal liver abscesses typically present as multiple small non-specific lesions with variable enhancement[14]. In particular, MRI may be useful for attempting to differentiate acute, subacute treated, and chronic healed fungal disease within the liver[16].Figure 8

Bottom Line: Multifocal liver lesions are encountered regularly in children and adolescents.By knowing the specific ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of benign and malignant pediatric liver lesions as well as the particular clinical setting, radiologists can frequently narrow the differential diagnosis and sometimes offer a definitive diagnosis.The purpose of this review article is to illustrate the imaging findings of numerous benign and malignant causes of multifocal liver lesions in the pediatric population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

ABSTRACT
Multifocal liver lesions are encountered regularly in children and adolescents. By knowing the specific ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of benign and malignant pediatric liver lesions as well as the particular clinical setting, radiologists can frequently narrow the differential diagnosis and sometimes offer a definitive diagnosis. The purpose of this review article is to illustrate the imaging findings of numerous benign and malignant causes of multifocal liver lesions in the pediatric population.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus