Limits...
Imaging of multifocal liver lesions in children and adolescents.

Hegde SV, Dillman JR, Lopez MJ, Strouse PJ - Cancer Imaging (2013)

Bottom Line: Multifocal liver lesions are encountered regularly in children and adolescents.By knowing the specific ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of benign and malignant pediatric liver lesions as well as the particular clinical setting, radiologists can frequently narrow the differential diagnosis and sometimes offer a definitive diagnosis.The purpose of this review article is to illustrate the imaging findings of numerous benign and malignant causes of multifocal liver lesions in the pediatric population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

ABSTRACT
Multifocal liver lesions are encountered regularly in children and adolescents. By knowing the specific ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of benign and malignant pediatric liver lesions as well as the particular clinical setting, radiologists can frequently narrow the differential diagnosis and sometimes offer a definitive diagnosis. The purpose of this review article is to illustrate the imaging findings of numerous benign and malignant causes of multifocal liver lesions in the pediatric population.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

A 16-year-old boy with Crohn disease. (a,b) Axial postcontrast CT images through the upper abdomen demonstrate multiple low attenuation liver lesions. A single lesion contains gas (arrow). Image-guided aspiration confirmed the diagnosis of multiple hepatic pyogenic abscesses.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569672&req=5

Figure 7: A 16-year-old boy with Crohn disease. (a,b) Axial postcontrast CT images through the upper abdomen demonstrate multiple low attenuation liver lesions. A single lesion contains gas (arrow). Image-guided aspiration confirmed the diagnosis of multiple hepatic pyogenic abscesses.

Mentions: On ultrasonography, pyogenic abscesses can demonstrate variable echogenicity[14]. Internal echogenic contents may be due to septations, debris or gas. On CT, these lesions are typically centrally hypoattenuating, have circumscribed or irregular margins, and demonstrate variable peripheral enhancement[14] (Fig. 7). Pyogenic abscesses are most commonly hypointense and hyperintense on T1-weighted and T2-weighted MR images, respectively, and they classically restrict diffusion on diffusion-weighted imaging. Variable amounts of perilesional edema may be observed on T2-weighted images[14], and intralesional gas can be detected on both CT and MRI on occasion (Fig. 7). In the setting of chronic granulomatous disease, multifocal hepatic abscesses may have a relatively solid appearance making them difficult to distinguish from metastatic disease or hepatic lymphoma.Figure 7


Imaging of multifocal liver lesions in children and adolescents.

Hegde SV, Dillman JR, Lopez MJ, Strouse PJ - Cancer Imaging (2013)

A 16-year-old boy with Crohn disease. (a,b) Axial postcontrast CT images through the upper abdomen demonstrate multiple low attenuation liver lesions. A single lesion contains gas (arrow). Image-guided aspiration confirmed the diagnosis of multiple hepatic pyogenic abscesses.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569672&req=5

Figure 7: A 16-year-old boy with Crohn disease. (a,b) Axial postcontrast CT images through the upper abdomen demonstrate multiple low attenuation liver lesions. A single lesion contains gas (arrow). Image-guided aspiration confirmed the diagnosis of multiple hepatic pyogenic abscesses.
Mentions: On ultrasonography, pyogenic abscesses can demonstrate variable echogenicity[14]. Internal echogenic contents may be due to septations, debris or gas. On CT, these lesions are typically centrally hypoattenuating, have circumscribed or irregular margins, and demonstrate variable peripheral enhancement[14] (Fig. 7). Pyogenic abscesses are most commonly hypointense and hyperintense on T1-weighted and T2-weighted MR images, respectively, and they classically restrict diffusion on diffusion-weighted imaging. Variable amounts of perilesional edema may be observed on T2-weighted images[14], and intralesional gas can be detected on both CT and MRI on occasion (Fig. 7). In the setting of chronic granulomatous disease, multifocal hepatic abscesses may have a relatively solid appearance making them difficult to distinguish from metastatic disease or hepatic lymphoma.Figure 7

Bottom Line: Multifocal liver lesions are encountered regularly in children and adolescents.By knowing the specific ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of benign and malignant pediatric liver lesions as well as the particular clinical setting, radiologists can frequently narrow the differential diagnosis and sometimes offer a definitive diagnosis.The purpose of this review article is to illustrate the imaging findings of numerous benign and malignant causes of multifocal liver lesions in the pediatric population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

ABSTRACT
Multifocal liver lesions are encountered regularly in children and adolescents. By knowing the specific ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of benign and malignant pediatric liver lesions as well as the particular clinical setting, radiologists can frequently narrow the differential diagnosis and sometimes offer a definitive diagnosis. The purpose of this review article is to illustrate the imaging findings of numerous benign and malignant causes of multifocal liver lesions in the pediatric population.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus