Limits...
Imaging of multifocal liver lesions in children and adolescents.

Hegde SV, Dillman JR, Lopez MJ, Strouse PJ - Cancer Imaging (2013)

Bottom Line: Multifocal liver lesions are encountered regularly in children and adolescents.By knowing the specific ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of benign and malignant pediatric liver lesions as well as the particular clinical setting, radiologists can frequently narrow the differential diagnosis and sometimes offer a definitive diagnosis.The purpose of this review article is to illustrate the imaging findings of numerous benign and malignant causes of multifocal liver lesions in the pediatric population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

ABSTRACT
Multifocal liver lesions are encountered regularly in children and adolescents. By knowing the specific ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of benign and malignant pediatric liver lesions as well as the particular clinical setting, radiologists can frequently narrow the differential diagnosis and sometimes offer a definitive diagnosis. The purpose of this review article is to illustrate the imaging findings of numerous benign and malignant causes of multifocal liver lesions in the pediatric population.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

A 16-year-old girl with a remote history of Wilms tumor and numerous (>10) liver lesions. Axial T1-weighted three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled fat-saturated arterial phase postcontrast MR image shows three representative hyperenhancing liver lesions (arrows) with circumscribed lobular borders. Several liver lesions were surgically biopsied with histopathology confirming the diagnosis of multiple FNHs.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569672&req=5

Figure 1: A 16-year-old girl with a remote history of Wilms tumor and numerous (>10) liver lesions. Axial T1-weighted three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled fat-saturated arterial phase postcontrast MR image shows three representative hyperenhancing liver lesions (arrows) with circumscribed lobular borders. Several liver lesions were surgically biopsied with histopathology confirming the diagnosis of multiple FNHs.

Mentions: Focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) is a hamartomatous liver lesion containing non-malignant hepatocytes, fibrous tissue, bile ducts, malformed blood vessels, and Kupffer cells[1]. Although the exact cause of this lesion is often uncertain, it is generally thought to be due to an underlying hepatic vascular disturbance. FNHs are seen with increased frequency in long-term survivors of childhood malignancies, perhaps a complication of chemotherapy or abdominal radiotherapy[2]. FNHs are very commonly multifocal in this setting (Figs. 1 and 2)[2].Figure 1


Imaging of multifocal liver lesions in children and adolescents.

Hegde SV, Dillman JR, Lopez MJ, Strouse PJ - Cancer Imaging (2013)

A 16-year-old girl with a remote history of Wilms tumor and numerous (>10) liver lesions. Axial T1-weighted three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled fat-saturated arterial phase postcontrast MR image shows three representative hyperenhancing liver lesions (arrows) with circumscribed lobular borders. Several liver lesions were surgically biopsied with histopathology confirming the diagnosis of multiple FNHs.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569672&req=5

Figure 1: A 16-year-old girl with a remote history of Wilms tumor and numerous (>10) liver lesions. Axial T1-weighted three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled fat-saturated arterial phase postcontrast MR image shows three representative hyperenhancing liver lesions (arrows) with circumscribed lobular borders. Several liver lesions were surgically biopsied with histopathology confirming the diagnosis of multiple FNHs.
Mentions: Focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) is a hamartomatous liver lesion containing non-malignant hepatocytes, fibrous tissue, bile ducts, malformed blood vessels, and Kupffer cells[1]. Although the exact cause of this lesion is often uncertain, it is generally thought to be due to an underlying hepatic vascular disturbance. FNHs are seen with increased frequency in long-term survivors of childhood malignancies, perhaps a complication of chemotherapy or abdominal radiotherapy[2]. FNHs are very commonly multifocal in this setting (Figs. 1 and 2)[2].Figure 1

Bottom Line: Multifocal liver lesions are encountered regularly in children and adolescents.By knowing the specific ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of benign and malignant pediatric liver lesions as well as the particular clinical setting, radiologists can frequently narrow the differential diagnosis and sometimes offer a definitive diagnosis.The purpose of this review article is to illustrate the imaging findings of numerous benign and malignant causes of multifocal liver lesions in the pediatric population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

ABSTRACT
Multifocal liver lesions are encountered regularly in children and adolescents. By knowing the specific ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of benign and malignant pediatric liver lesions as well as the particular clinical setting, radiologists can frequently narrow the differential diagnosis and sometimes offer a definitive diagnosis. The purpose of this review article is to illustrate the imaging findings of numerous benign and malignant causes of multifocal liver lesions in the pediatric population.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus