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Cultural regulation of emotion: individual, relational, and structural sources.

De Leersnyder J, Boiger M, Mesquita B - Front Psychol (2013)

Bottom Line: We review evidence suggesting that emotion regulation underlying cultural differences in emotional experience often takes place at the point of emotion elicitation through the promotion of situations and appraisals that are consistent with culturally valued relationships.These regulatory processes depend on individual tendencies, but are also co-regulated within relationships-close others shape people's environment and help them appraise events in culturally valued ways-and are afforded by structural conditions-people's daily lives "limit" the opportunities for emotion, and afford certain appraisals.The combined evidence suggests that cultural differences in emotion regulation go well beyond the effortful regulation based on display rules.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Social and Cultural Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Leuven Leuven, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
The most prevalent and intense emotional experiences differ across cultures. These differences in emotional experience can be understood as the outcomes of emotion regulation, because emotions that fit the valued relationships within a culture tend to be most common and intense. We review evidence suggesting that emotion regulation underlying cultural differences in emotional experience often takes place at the point of emotion elicitation through the promotion of situations and appraisals that are consistent with culturally valued relationships. These regulatory processes depend on individual tendencies, but are also co-regulated within relationships-close others shape people's environment and help them appraise events in culturally valued ways-and are afforded by structural conditions-people's daily lives "limit" the opportunities for emotion, and afford certain appraisals. The combined evidence suggests that cultural differences in emotion regulation go well beyond the effortful regulation based on display rules.

No MeSH data available.


Three sources of antecedent-focused emotion regulation in cultural context.
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Figure 1: Three sources of antecedent-focused emotion regulation in cultural context.

Mentions: We distinguish two other sources of regulation. First, there is some evidence for relational co-regulation by close others, most notably the work on parents' regulation of children's emotions—e.g., a caregiver telling the child that her brother did not break the toy on purpose, and that she should get over her anger (e.g., Eisenberg et al., 1999; Campos et al., 2004; Holodynski and Friedlmeier, 2006). Furthermore, we distinguish a third source of emotion regulation, which is of a structural nature: The organization of everyday life affords certain types of emotional situations, and suppresses others. Our review of cultural differences in emotion regulation includes all three sources (individual, relational and structural) for the two types of antecedent-focused emotion regulation (situation selection and appraisal). Figure 1 shows how cultural ideals provide a background against which individual tendencies, relational co-regulation and structural affordances bring about certain emotional experiences through these two types of regulation.


Cultural regulation of emotion: individual, relational, and structural sources.

De Leersnyder J, Boiger M, Mesquita B - Front Psychol (2013)

Three sources of antecedent-focused emotion regulation in cultural context.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569661&req=5

Figure 1: Three sources of antecedent-focused emotion regulation in cultural context.
Mentions: We distinguish two other sources of regulation. First, there is some evidence for relational co-regulation by close others, most notably the work on parents' regulation of children's emotions—e.g., a caregiver telling the child that her brother did not break the toy on purpose, and that she should get over her anger (e.g., Eisenberg et al., 1999; Campos et al., 2004; Holodynski and Friedlmeier, 2006). Furthermore, we distinguish a third source of emotion regulation, which is of a structural nature: The organization of everyday life affords certain types of emotional situations, and suppresses others. Our review of cultural differences in emotion regulation includes all three sources (individual, relational and structural) for the two types of antecedent-focused emotion regulation (situation selection and appraisal). Figure 1 shows how cultural ideals provide a background against which individual tendencies, relational co-regulation and structural affordances bring about certain emotional experiences through these two types of regulation.

Bottom Line: We review evidence suggesting that emotion regulation underlying cultural differences in emotional experience often takes place at the point of emotion elicitation through the promotion of situations and appraisals that are consistent with culturally valued relationships.These regulatory processes depend on individual tendencies, but are also co-regulated within relationships-close others shape people's environment and help them appraise events in culturally valued ways-and are afforded by structural conditions-people's daily lives "limit" the opportunities for emotion, and afford certain appraisals.The combined evidence suggests that cultural differences in emotion regulation go well beyond the effortful regulation based on display rules.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Social and Cultural Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Leuven Leuven, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
The most prevalent and intense emotional experiences differ across cultures. These differences in emotional experience can be understood as the outcomes of emotion regulation, because emotions that fit the valued relationships within a culture tend to be most common and intense. We review evidence suggesting that emotion regulation underlying cultural differences in emotional experience often takes place at the point of emotion elicitation through the promotion of situations and appraisals that are consistent with culturally valued relationships. These regulatory processes depend on individual tendencies, but are also co-regulated within relationships-close others shape people's environment and help them appraise events in culturally valued ways-and are afforded by structural conditions-people's daily lives "limit" the opportunities for emotion, and afford certain appraisals. The combined evidence suggests that cultural differences in emotion regulation go well beyond the effortful regulation based on display rules.

No MeSH data available.