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Bacterial toxicity/compatibility of platinum nanospheres, nanocuboids and nanoflowers.

Gopal J, Hasan N, Manikandan M, Wu HF - Sci Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: The bacterio-toxic or compatible properties of these five different sized Pt NPs with the clinical pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa were explored by many analytical methods such as the conventional plate count method, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence sensoring techniques.The results revealed that the 1-3 nm sized (P1 and P2) Pt NPs showed bacterio-toxic properties while the 4-21 nm (P3, P4 and P5) Pt NPs exhibited bacterio-compatible properties.The information released from this study is significantly important to future clinical, medical, biological and biomedical applications of Pt NPs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 70 Lien-Hai Road, 80424, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
For the first time, we have investigated the bacterial toxicity or compatibility properties of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) with different sizes (P1, P2, P3, P4 and P5). The bacterio-toxic or compatible properties of these five different sized Pt NPs with the clinical pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa were explored by many analytical methods such as the conventional plate count method, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence sensoring techniques. The results revealed that the 1-3 nm sized (P1 and P2) Pt NPs showed bacterio-toxic properties while the 4-21 nm (P3, P4 and P5) Pt NPs exhibited bacterio-compatible properties. This is the first study which reports the bacterial toxicity of Pt NPs. The information released from this study is significantly important to future clinical, medical, biological and biomedical applications of Pt NPs.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

TEM micrographs showing morphology and size distribution histograms of (a–b) P1, (c–d) P2, (e–f) P3, (g–h) P4 and (i–j) P5 Pt NPs respectively.
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f1: TEM micrographs showing morphology and size distribution histograms of (a–b) P1, (c–d) P2, (e–f) P3, (g–h) P4 and (i–j) P5 Pt NPs respectively.

Mentions: Five different sized and shaped Pt NPs were synthesized using an extension of a existing protocol reported by Koebel et al42. Supporting figure S1 gives the schematic representation of the methodology followed in this study. We named these Pt NPs as P1, P2, P3, P4 and P5 with respect to the order of increasing concentrations of precursor added to the reaction mixture during synthesis. Fig. 1 displays the TEM micrographs and the particle size distribution histograms of the Pt NPs. As observed from Fig. 1(a) the P1 were spherical shaped and were extremely small equivalent to nanodot sizes with particle sizes predominating in the range of 1–2 nm (Fig. 1(b)). P2 were also spherical morphologies, where mostly 2–3 nm particle sizes predominated (Fig. 1(c–d)). P3 were cuboidal shaped (Fig. 1(e)). In this case, as observed from Fig. 1(f), the 5–6 nm particles predominated. Fig. 1(g) presents the TEM micrographs of P4 showing particle shapes which appeared more oval to spherical than cuboidal. In P4 (Fig. 1(h)), 6–8 nm sizes dominated. P5 showed a distinctly different morphology having a floral shape, these nanoflowers (Fig. 1(i)) were observed to have 16–18 nm sizes dominating (Fig. 1(j)). Fig. S2A and S2B display the TEM micrograph and particle size distribution of P6 which were also attempted using 600 mg precursor concentration, but as we can observe from the TEM image, since the morphology remained similar to the P5 nanoflowers and also the sizes had decreased (13 nm predominating), we did not take up P6 for further experiments.


Bacterial toxicity/compatibility of platinum nanospheres, nanocuboids and nanoflowers.

Gopal J, Hasan N, Manikandan M, Wu HF - Sci Rep (2013)

TEM micrographs showing morphology and size distribution histograms of (a–b) P1, (c–d) P2, (e–f) P3, (g–h) P4 and (i–j) P5 Pt NPs respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569627&req=5

f1: TEM micrographs showing morphology and size distribution histograms of (a–b) P1, (c–d) P2, (e–f) P3, (g–h) P4 and (i–j) P5 Pt NPs respectively.
Mentions: Five different sized and shaped Pt NPs were synthesized using an extension of a existing protocol reported by Koebel et al42. Supporting figure S1 gives the schematic representation of the methodology followed in this study. We named these Pt NPs as P1, P2, P3, P4 and P5 with respect to the order of increasing concentrations of precursor added to the reaction mixture during synthesis. Fig. 1 displays the TEM micrographs and the particle size distribution histograms of the Pt NPs. As observed from Fig. 1(a) the P1 were spherical shaped and were extremely small equivalent to nanodot sizes with particle sizes predominating in the range of 1–2 nm (Fig. 1(b)). P2 were also spherical morphologies, where mostly 2–3 nm particle sizes predominated (Fig. 1(c–d)). P3 were cuboidal shaped (Fig. 1(e)). In this case, as observed from Fig. 1(f), the 5–6 nm particles predominated. Fig. 1(g) presents the TEM micrographs of P4 showing particle shapes which appeared more oval to spherical than cuboidal. In P4 (Fig. 1(h)), 6–8 nm sizes dominated. P5 showed a distinctly different morphology having a floral shape, these nanoflowers (Fig. 1(i)) were observed to have 16–18 nm sizes dominating (Fig. 1(j)). Fig. S2A and S2B display the TEM micrograph and particle size distribution of P6 which were also attempted using 600 mg precursor concentration, but as we can observe from the TEM image, since the morphology remained similar to the P5 nanoflowers and also the sizes had decreased (13 nm predominating), we did not take up P6 for further experiments.

Bottom Line: The bacterio-toxic or compatible properties of these five different sized Pt NPs with the clinical pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa were explored by many analytical methods such as the conventional plate count method, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence sensoring techniques.The results revealed that the 1-3 nm sized (P1 and P2) Pt NPs showed bacterio-toxic properties while the 4-21 nm (P3, P4 and P5) Pt NPs exhibited bacterio-compatible properties.The information released from this study is significantly important to future clinical, medical, biological and biomedical applications of Pt NPs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 70 Lien-Hai Road, 80424, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
For the first time, we have investigated the bacterial toxicity or compatibility properties of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) with different sizes (P1, P2, P3, P4 and P5). The bacterio-toxic or compatible properties of these five different sized Pt NPs with the clinical pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa were explored by many analytical methods such as the conventional plate count method, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence sensoring techniques. The results revealed that the 1-3 nm sized (P1 and P2) Pt NPs showed bacterio-toxic properties while the 4-21 nm (P3, P4 and P5) Pt NPs exhibited bacterio-compatible properties. This is the first study which reports the bacterial toxicity of Pt NPs. The information released from this study is significantly important to future clinical, medical, biological and biomedical applications of Pt NPs.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus