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Monitoring the presence of ionic mercury in environmental water by plasmon-enhanced infrared spectroscopy.

Hoang CV, Oyama M, Saito O, Aono M, Nagao T - Sci Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: Here, we adopted single-stranded thiolated 15-base DNA oligonucleotides that are immobilized on the Au surface and show strong specificity to Hg²⁺.The mercury-associated distinct signal is located apart from the biomolecule-associated broad signals and is selectively characterized.For example, with natural water from Lake Kasumigaura (Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan), direct detection of Hg²⁺ with a concentration as low as 37 ppt (37 × 10⁻¹⁰%) was readily demonstrated, indicating the high potential of this simple method for environmental and chemical sensing of metallic species in aqueous solution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: WPI Center for Materials NanoArchitectonics-MANA, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044, Japan. Hoang.ChungVu@nims.go.jp

ABSTRACT
We demonstrate the ppt-level single-step selective monitoring of the presence of mercury ions (Hg²⁺) dissolved in environmental water by plasmon-enhanced vibrational spectroscopy. We combined a nanogap-optimized mid-infrared plasmonic structure with mercury-binding DNA aptamers to monitor in-situ the spectral evolution of the vibrational signal of the DNA induced by the mercury binding. Here, we adopted single-stranded thiolated 15-base DNA oligonucleotides that are immobilized on the Au surface and show strong specificity to Hg²⁺. The mercury-associated distinct signal is located apart from the biomolecule-associated broad signals and is selectively characterized. For example, with natural water from Lake Kasumigaura (Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan), direct detection of Hg²⁺ with a concentration as low as 37 ppt (37 × 10⁻¹⁰%) was readily demonstrated, indicating the high potential of this simple method for environmental and chemical sensing of metallic species in aqueous solution.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

IR spectra from DNA aptamers.(a) and (b): The relative IR spectra of DNA on AuNP plasmonic structure in pure water under different polarization conditions, s-polarization (a) and p-polarization (b). (c) Measurement performed in sampled water from Lake Kasumigaura. The red and blue features indicate vibrational signals from the DNA and residual biomolecules from Lake Kasumigaura, respectively. Schematic on the right of each graph shows the corresponding depiction of the measurements.
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f3: IR spectra from DNA aptamers.(a) and (b): The relative IR spectra of DNA on AuNP plasmonic structure in pure water under different polarization conditions, s-polarization (a) and p-polarization (b). (c) Measurement performed in sampled water from Lake Kasumigaura. The red and blue features indicate vibrational signals from the DNA and residual biomolecules from Lake Kasumigaura, respectively. Schematic on the right of each graph shows the corresponding depiction of the measurements.

Mentions: Figure 3(a) and 3(b) show the relative IR reflectance spectra (in deionized water) after the monolayer adsorption of DNA on the Au nanostructure recorded with two different polarizations. Two antiabsorption features located at ca. ω = 1380 cm−1 and 3400 cm−1 are found for both polarizations (as indicated by the two dashed lines in the figures). The former antiabsorption feature corresponds to the desorption of the excess molecules (such as APTES and trisodium citrate) that remained after the fabrication of the Au nanostructure. We often observe this feature during the adsorption of different thiol end-capped molecules, which could be the consequence of the weaker bonding of these residual molecules compared with the strong Au-S bonds. The latter broad feature around corresponds to the O-H stretching vibration of water, which is gradually replaced by the DNA as they are adsorbed.


Monitoring the presence of ionic mercury in environmental water by plasmon-enhanced infrared spectroscopy.

Hoang CV, Oyama M, Saito O, Aono M, Nagao T - Sci Rep (2013)

IR spectra from DNA aptamers.(a) and (b): The relative IR spectra of DNA on AuNP plasmonic structure in pure water under different polarization conditions, s-polarization (a) and p-polarization (b). (c) Measurement performed in sampled water from Lake Kasumigaura. The red and blue features indicate vibrational signals from the DNA and residual biomolecules from Lake Kasumigaura, respectively. Schematic on the right of each graph shows the corresponding depiction of the measurements.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569543&req=5

f3: IR spectra from DNA aptamers.(a) and (b): The relative IR spectra of DNA on AuNP plasmonic structure in pure water under different polarization conditions, s-polarization (a) and p-polarization (b). (c) Measurement performed in sampled water from Lake Kasumigaura. The red and blue features indicate vibrational signals from the DNA and residual biomolecules from Lake Kasumigaura, respectively. Schematic on the right of each graph shows the corresponding depiction of the measurements.
Mentions: Figure 3(a) and 3(b) show the relative IR reflectance spectra (in deionized water) after the monolayer adsorption of DNA on the Au nanostructure recorded with two different polarizations. Two antiabsorption features located at ca. ω = 1380 cm−1 and 3400 cm−1 are found for both polarizations (as indicated by the two dashed lines in the figures). The former antiabsorption feature corresponds to the desorption of the excess molecules (such as APTES and trisodium citrate) that remained after the fabrication of the Au nanostructure. We often observe this feature during the adsorption of different thiol end-capped molecules, which could be the consequence of the weaker bonding of these residual molecules compared with the strong Au-S bonds. The latter broad feature around corresponds to the O-H stretching vibration of water, which is gradually replaced by the DNA as they are adsorbed.

Bottom Line: Here, we adopted single-stranded thiolated 15-base DNA oligonucleotides that are immobilized on the Au surface and show strong specificity to Hg²⁺.The mercury-associated distinct signal is located apart from the biomolecule-associated broad signals and is selectively characterized.For example, with natural water from Lake Kasumigaura (Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan), direct detection of Hg²⁺ with a concentration as low as 37 ppt (37 × 10⁻¹⁰%) was readily demonstrated, indicating the high potential of this simple method for environmental and chemical sensing of metallic species in aqueous solution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: WPI Center for Materials NanoArchitectonics-MANA, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044, Japan. Hoang.ChungVu@nims.go.jp

ABSTRACT
We demonstrate the ppt-level single-step selective monitoring of the presence of mercury ions (Hg²⁺) dissolved in environmental water by plasmon-enhanced vibrational spectroscopy. We combined a nanogap-optimized mid-infrared plasmonic structure with mercury-binding DNA aptamers to monitor in-situ the spectral evolution of the vibrational signal of the DNA induced by the mercury binding. Here, we adopted single-stranded thiolated 15-base DNA oligonucleotides that are immobilized on the Au surface and show strong specificity to Hg²⁺. The mercury-associated distinct signal is located apart from the biomolecule-associated broad signals and is selectively characterized. For example, with natural water from Lake Kasumigaura (Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan), direct detection of Hg²⁺ with a concentration as low as 37 ppt (37 × 10⁻¹⁰%) was readily demonstrated, indicating the high potential of this simple method for environmental and chemical sensing of metallic species in aqueous solution.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus