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Predictors of bovine TB risk behaviour amongst meat handlers in Nigeria: a cross-sectional study guided by the health belief model.

Hambolu D, Freeman J, Taddese HB - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: The prevalence of eating Fuku Elegusi was found to be 22%.Meat handlers in developing countries bear high risk to bTB owing to prevailing social and cognition determinants.Findings were largely consistent with the propositions of HBM.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Federal Department of Livestock and Pest Control Services, Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Water Resources, Abuja, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT

Background: Bovine Tuberculosis (bTB) is still a serious public health threat in developing countries. The aim of this study is to determine the social and cognitive factors predicting one of the risk behaviours amongst meat handlers in Nigeria, namely, eating Fuku Elegusi. This is the practice of eating the visibly infected parts of the lung in-order to convince customers to buy meat. The study is guided by the health belief model (HBM).

Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 349 randomly selected meat handlers in Oko-Oba Abattoir, in Lagos State. Descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression analysis were employed to determine perceptions and prevalence of risk behaviours and to identify predictors of eating Fuku Elegusi.

Results: Just over a quarter (28.1%) of the study participants knew that eating Fuku Elegusi could be a source of bTB in humans. The prevalence of eating Fuku Elegusi was found to be 22%. Across all knowledge indicators related to bTB, those who don't eat Fuku Elegusi exhibited better knowledge. Strong predictors of eating Fuku Elegusi were: being male (OR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.10 to 5.19; p = 0.03), not knowing that eating Fuku Elegusi exposes to bTB (OR: 3.72, 95% CI: 1.69 to 8.22; p = 0.001), and the perception that one cannot sell meat without tasting it (perceived barrier) (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.13 to 1.60; p = 0.001). Lower risk of eating Fuku Elegusi was predicted by perceived susceptibility to bTB due to another risk behaviour, namely, not washing hands after handling meat (OR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.64 to 0.96; p-value = 0.021). Television and radio were the most acceptable media for TB prevention messages (78.5% and 75.6% respectively).

Conclusion: Meat handlers in developing countries bear high risk to bTB owing to prevailing social and cognition determinants. Findings were largely consistent with the propositions of HBM.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Cues to action, n = 349.The most popular interventions for facilitating the adoption of protective behaviours and practices were: educational programmes, supply of free protective clothing, adequate compensation for cooperating with test and slaughter campaigns, government imposed penalties, and television and radio advertisements for dissemination of positive health seeking behaviour re-enforcing messages. More than 75% of respondents either strongly agreed or agreed to these suggested interventions. In contrast, just about 30% agreed or strongly agreed to newspaper adverts.
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pone-0056091-g001: Cues to action, n = 349.The most popular interventions for facilitating the adoption of protective behaviours and practices were: educational programmes, supply of free protective clothing, adequate compensation for cooperating with test and slaughter campaigns, government imposed penalties, and television and radio advertisements for dissemination of positive health seeking behaviour re-enforcing messages. More than 75% of respondents either strongly agreed or agreed to these suggested interventions. In contrast, just about 30% agreed or strongly agreed to newspaper adverts.

Mentions: Finally, when looking at cues to action, the overwhelming majority of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that educational programmes and free provision of protective clothing would help (95.2% and 87.7% respectively) (Figure 1). In addition, 87.6% of respondents felt that they would need adequate compensation in order to comply with meat inspections and 76% felt that government imposed penalties for those who do not practise safe measures would work. Both television and radio advertisements on TB control were popular with respondents (78.5% and 75.6% respectively) whereas only a minority were in favour of newspaper advertisements (30.3%).


Predictors of bovine TB risk behaviour amongst meat handlers in Nigeria: a cross-sectional study guided by the health belief model.

Hambolu D, Freeman J, Taddese HB - PLoS ONE (2013)

Cues to action, n = 349.The most popular interventions for facilitating the adoption of protective behaviours and practices were: educational programmes, supply of free protective clothing, adequate compensation for cooperating with test and slaughter campaigns, government imposed penalties, and television and radio advertisements for dissemination of positive health seeking behaviour re-enforcing messages. More than 75% of respondents either strongly agreed or agreed to these suggested interventions. In contrast, just about 30% agreed or strongly agreed to newspaper adverts.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569413&req=5

pone-0056091-g001: Cues to action, n = 349.The most popular interventions for facilitating the adoption of protective behaviours and practices were: educational programmes, supply of free protective clothing, adequate compensation for cooperating with test and slaughter campaigns, government imposed penalties, and television and radio advertisements for dissemination of positive health seeking behaviour re-enforcing messages. More than 75% of respondents either strongly agreed or agreed to these suggested interventions. In contrast, just about 30% agreed or strongly agreed to newspaper adverts.
Mentions: Finally, when looking at cues to action, the overwhelming majority of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that educational programmes and free provision of protective clothing would help (95.2% and 87.7% respectively) (Figure 1). In addition, 87.6% of respondents felt that they would need adequate compensation in order to comply with meat inspections and 76% felt that government imposed penalties for those who do not practise safe measures would work. Both television and radio advertisements on TB control were popular with respondents (78.5% and 75.6% respectively) whereas only a minority were in favour of newspaper advertisements (30.3%).

Bottom Line: The prevalence of eating Fuku Elegusi was found to be 22%.Meat handlers in developing countries bear high risk to bTB owing to prevailing social and cognition determinants.Findings were largely consistent with the propositions of HBM.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Federal Department of Livestock and Pest Control Services, Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Water Resources, Abuja, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT

Background: Bovine Tuberculosis (bTB) is still a serious public health threat in developing countries. The aim of this study is to determine the social and cognitive factors predicting one of the risk behaviours amongst meat handlers in Nigeria, namely, eating Fuku Elegusi. This is the practice of eating the visibly infected parts of the lung in-order to convince customers to buy meat. The study is guided by the health belief model (HBM).

Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 349 randomly selected meat handlers in Oko-Oba Abattoir, in Lagos State. Descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression analysis were employed to determine perceptions and prevalence of risk behaviours and to identify predictors of eating Fuku Elegusi.

Results: Just over a quarter (28.1%) of the study participants knew that eating Fuku Elegusi could be a source of bTB in humans. The prevalence of eating Fuku Elegusi was found to be 22%. Across all knowledge indicators related to bTB, those who don't eat Fuku Elegusi exhibited better knowledge. Strong predictors of eating Fuku Elegusi were: being male (OR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.10 to 5.19; p = 0.03), not knowing that eating Fuku Elegusi exposes to bTB (OR: 3.72, 95% CI: 1.69 to 8.22; p = 0.001), and the perception that one cannot sell meat without tasting it (perceived barrier) (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.13 to 1.60; p = 0.001). Lower risk of eating Fuku Elegusi was predicted by perceived susceptibility to bTB due to another risk behaviour, namely, not washing hands after handling meat (OR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.64 to 0.96; p-value = 0.021). Television and radio were the most acceptable media for TB prevention messages (78.5% and 75.6% respectively).

Conclusion: Meat handlers in developing countries bear high risk to bTB owing to prevailing social and cognition determinants. Findings were largely consistent with the propositions of HBM.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus