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Diagnostic challenges of nonodontogenic toothache.

Park HO, Ha JH, Jin MU, Kim YK, Kim SK - Restor Dent Endod (2012)

Bottom Line: Two cases are presented in which one is related to the upper left second premolar and the other is related to the upper left first molar.Both showed pain when chewing.These two cases highlight the complexities involved in diagnosing nonodontogenic toothache.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Conservative Dentistry, Kyungpook National University School of Dentistry, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT
THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS ARTICLE WAS TO PRESENT TWO NONODONTOGENIC CONDITIONS THAT MAY MIMIC ODONTOGENIC TOOTHACHE: trigeminal neuralgia and burning mouth syndrome. Two cases are presented in which one is related to the upper left second premolar and the other is related to the upper left first molar. Both showed pain when chewing. These two cases highlight the complexities involved in diagnosing nonodontogenic toothache. This article demonstrates the importance of having a thorough knowledge of both odontogenic and nonodontogenic toothache, as well as the need for careful evaluation of the nature of the pain and history, clinical and radiographic examinations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Periapical radiography of tooth #26 at initial presentation; (b) Completion of root canal retreatment; (c) 9-month follow-up radiography; (d) 10-month follow-up radiography.
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Figure 3: (a) Periapical radiography of tooth #26 at initial presentation; (b) Completion of root canal retreatment; (c) 9-month follow-up radiography; (d) 10-month follow-up radiography.

Mentions: Clinical examination revealed that tooth #26 was restored with gold crown. Percussion and bite testing of #26 were positive and periodontal probing depths of #26 were less than 3 mm. All adjacent teeth responded within normal limits for percussion, palpation, bite test and vitality when tested with cold and electronic pulp tester. Radiographic examination revealed tooth #26 had root canal treatment and no noticeable pathologies were observed (Figure 3a). On the basis of clinical findings and history of pain, a diagnosis of acute apical periodontitis was suspected. Root canal retreatment was performed on this tooth. During the treatment, missing canal MB2 of #26 was found. After canal enlargement and canal dressing with calcium hydroxide on MB2 canal of #26, the pain was relieved and root canal retreatment was completed (Figure 2b) on assumption that acute apical periodontitis because of untreated canal, MB2 of #26 was the source of her pain.


Diagnostic challenges of nonodontogenic toothache.

Park HO, Ha JH, Jin MU, Kim YK, Kim SK - Restor Dent Endod (2012)

(a) Periapical radiography of tooth #26 at initial presentation; (b) Completion of root canal retreatment; (c) 9-month follow-up radiography; (d) 10-month follow-up radiography.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569403&req=5

Figure 3: (a) Periapical radiography of tooth #26 at initial presentation; (b) Completion of root canal retreatment; (c) 9-month follow-up radiography; (d) 10-month follow-up radiography.
Mentions: Clinical examination revealed that tooth #26 was restored with gold crown. Percussion and bite testing of #26 were positive and periodontal probing depths of #26 were less than 3 mm. All adjacent teeth responded within normal limits for percussion, palpation, bite test and vitality when tested with cold and electronic pulp tester. Radiographic examination revealed tooth #26 had root canal treatment and no noticeable pathologies were observed (Figure 3a). On the basis of clinical findings and history of pain, a diagnosis of acute apical periodontitis was suspected. Root canal retreatment was performed on this tooth. During the treatment, missing canal MB2 of #26 was found. After canal enlargement and canal dressing with calcium hydroxide on MB2 canal of #26, the pain was relieved and root canal retreatment was completed (Figure 2b) on assumption that acute apical periodontitis because of untreated canal, MB2 of #26 was the source of her pain.

Bottom Line: Two cases are presented in which one is related to the upper left second premolar and the other is related to the upper left first molar.Both showed pain when chewing.These two cases highlight the complexities involved in diagnosing nonodontogenic toothache.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Conservative Dentistry, Kyungpook National University School of Dentistry, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT
THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS ARTICLE WAS TO PRESENT TWO NONODONTOGENIC CONDITIONS THAT MAY MIMIC ODONTOGENIC TOOTHACHE: trigeminal neuralgia and burning mouth syndrome. Two cases are presented in which one is related to the upper left second premolar and the other is related to the upper left first molar. Both showed pain when chewing. These two cases highlight the complexities involved in diagnosing nonodontogenic toothache. This article demonstrates the importance of having a thorough knowledge of both odontogenic and nonodontogenic toothache, as well as the need for careful evaluation of the nature of the pain and history, clinical and radiographic examinations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus