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Diagnostic challenges of nonodontogenic toothache.

Park HO, Ha JH, Jin MU, Kim YK, Kim SK - Restor Dent Endod (2012)

Bottom Line: Two cases are presented in which one is related to the upper left second premolar and the other is related to the upper left first molar.Both showed pain when chewing.These two cases highlight the complexities involved in diagnosing nonodontogenic toothache.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Conservative Dentistry, Kyungpook National University School of Dentistry, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT
THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS ARTICLE WAS TO PRESENT TWO NONODONTOGENIC CONDITIONS THAT MAY MIMIC ODONTOGENIC TOOTHACHE: trigeminal neuralgia and burning mouth syndrome. Two cases are presented in which one is related to the upper left second premolar and the other is related to the upper left first molar. Both showed pain when chewing. These two cases highlight the complexities involved in diagnosing nonodontogenic toothache. This article demonstrates the importance of having a thorough knowledge of both odontogenic and nonodontogenic toothache, as well as the need for careful evaluation of the nature of the pain and history, clinical and radiographic examinations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Radiographic image showing distal caries of tooth #45; (b) Tooth is restored with composite resin.
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Figure 2: (a) Radiographic image showing distal caries of tooth #45; (b) Tooth is restored with composite resin.

Mentions: On follow-up 2 week later, the patient was still experiencing what she described as 'sharp pain' from her lower right tooth not from tooth #15. At this time she pointed to tooth #45 and insisted that sharp pain resulted when chewing. Tooth #45 was slightly sensitive to percussion and pain could be elicited by bite test of the tooth. Tooth #45 responded within normal limits when tested with cold and electronic pulp tester. A caries cavity was observed at the distal surface of #45 on the radiograph (Figure 2a). Intraligamental injection on #45 area resulted in relieving the pain. A definitive diagnosis could not be made from the clinical findings. Distal caries on #45 was removed and the tooth was restored with composite resin (Figure 2b).


Diagnostic challenges of nonodontogenic toothache.

Park HO, Ha JH, Jin MU, Kim YK, Kim SK - Restor Dent Endod (2012)

(a) Radiographic image showing distal caries of tooth #45; (b) Tooth is restored with composite resin.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569403&req=5

Figure 2: (a) Radiographic image showing distal caries of tooth #45; (b) Tooth is restored with composite resin.
Mentions: On follow-up 2 week later, the patient was still experiencing what she described as 'sharp pain' from her lower right tooth not from tooth #15. At this time she pointed to tooth #45 and insisted that sharp pain resulted when chewing. Tooth #45 was slightly sensitive to percussion and pain could be elicited by bite test of the tooth. Tooth #45 responded within normal limits when tested with cold and electronic pulp tester. A caries cavity was observed at the distal surface of #45 on the radiograph (Figure 2a). Intraligamental injection on #45 area resulted in relieving the pain. A definitive diagnosis could not be made from the clinical findings. Distal caries on #45 was removed and the tooth was restored with composite resin (Figure 2b).

Bottom Line: Two cases are presented in which one is related to the upper left second premolar and the other is related to the upper left first molar.Both showed pain when chewing.These two cases highlight the complexities involved in diagnosing nonodontogenic toothache.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Conservative Dentistry, Kyungpook National University School of Dentistry, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT
THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS ARTICLE WAS TO PRESENT TWO NONODONTOGENIC CONDITIONS THAT MAY MIMIC ODONTOGENIC TOOTHACHE: trigeminal neuralgia and burning mouth syndrome. Two cases are presented in which one is related to the upper left second premolar and the other is related to the upper left first molar. Both showed pain when chewing. These two cases highlight the complexities involved in diagnosing nonodontogenic toothache. This article demonstrates the importance of having a thorough knowledge of both odontogenic and nonodontogenic toothache, as well as the need for careful evaluation of the nature of the pain and history, clinical and radiographic examinations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus