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Evaluation of knowledge of cancer pain management among medical practitioners in a low-resource setting.

Ogboli-Nwasor E, Makama J, Yusufu L - J Pain Res (2013)

Bottom Line: Information was obtained using a structured questionnaire, and the data were analyzed using SPSS (version 11.5).The response rate to the questionnaire was 82%, with an age range of 23 to 50 years (mean age, 34.9), and the majority of actual respondents, 55 (67%), were male.Concerning the type of analgesic commonly used for cancer patients, 43% used weak opioids, 32% used NSAIDs, and only 20% used strong opioids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesia, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Shika, Zaria, Nigeria;

ABSTRACT

Background: Several factors considered to be barriers to cancer pain management have been reported in the past. The knowledge of cancer pain management may be a hindrance to the proper assessment and treatment of pain in cancer patients.

Objective: This report presents an evaluation of the knowledge and practice of cancer pain management among medical practitioners in Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Shika, Zaria.

Methods: This report involves medical practitioners at the Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital who are directly involved in the management of cancer patients. Information was obtained using a structured questionnaire, and the data were analyzed using SPSS (version 11.5).

Results: The response rate to the questionnaire was 82%, with an age range of 23 to 50 years (mean age, 34.9), and the majority of actual respondents, 55 (67%), were male. Thirty-six (44%) strongly agreed that cancer patients require pain relief. Yet only 40% of the respondents routinely conducted pain assessments among cancer patients, while 51% only treated when patients complained of pain. Concerning the type of analgesic commonly used for cancer patients, 43% used weak opioids, 32% used NSAIDs, and only 20% used strong opioids. Seventy-five respondents (91.5%) had no formal training on pain management.

Conclusion: The knowledge of pain management for cancer patients among medical personnel at the Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital appears to be elementary. We recommend that formal training in the form of lectures, seminars, and workshops on cancer pain management should be part of continuing medical education in low-resource settings like the Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Perceived limitations to adequate cancer pain management.
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f7-jpr-6-071: Perceived limitations to adequate cancer pain management.

Mentions: In the case of perceived limitations to adequate cancer pain management, 44 (53.7%) of the respondents felt that they had poor knowledge of cancer pain management, 18 (22.%) were of the opinion that patients arrive at the hospital with already advanced stages of cancer, 13 (15.9%) were afraid of serious drug side effects, while seven (8.5%) reported the non-availability of stronger analgesic drugs (Figure 7). When respondents were asked whether they have had any formal training on pain management, 75 (91.5%) had no formal training, while only seven (8.5%) had received some formal training on pain management.


Evaluation of knowledge of cancer pain management among medical practitioners in a low-resource setting.

Ogboli-Nwasor E, Makama J, Yusufu L - J Pain Res (2013)

Perceived limitations to adequate cancer pain management.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569380&req=5

f7-jpr-6-071: Perceived limitations to adequate cancer pain management.
Mentions: In the case of perceived limitations to adequate cancer pain management, 44 (53.7%) of the respondents felt that they had poor knowledge of cancer pain management, 18 (22.%) were of the opinion that patients arrive at the hospital with already advanced stages of cancer, 13 (15.9%) were afraid of serious drug side effects, while seven (8.5%) reported the non-availability of stronger analgesic drugs (Figure 7). When respondents were asked whether they have had any formal training on pain management, 75 (91.5%) had no formal training, while only seven (8.5%) had received some formal training on pain management.

Bottom Line: Information was obtained using a structured questionnaire, and the data were analyzed using SPSS (version 11.5).The response rate to the questionnaire was 82%, with an age range of 23 to 50 years (mean age, 34.9), and the majority of actual respondents, 55 (67%), were male.Concerning the type of analgesic commonly used for cancer patients, 43% used weak opioids, 32% used NSAIDs, and only 20% used strong opioids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesia, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Shika, Zaria, Nigeria;

ABSTRACT

Background: Several factors considered to be barriers to cancer pain management have been reported in the past. The knowledge of cancer pain management may be a hindrance to the proper assessment and treatment of pain in cancer patients.

Objective: This report presents an evaluation of the knowledge and practice of cancer pain management among medical practitioners in Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Shika, Zaria.

Methods: This report involves medical practitioners at the Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital who are directly involved in the management of cancer patients. Information was obtained using a structured questionnaire, and the data were analyzed using SPSS (version 11.5).

Results: The response rate to the questionnaire was 82%, with an age range of 23 to 50 years (mean age, 34.9), and the majority of actual respondents, 55 (67%), were male. Thirty-six (44%) strongly agreed that cancer patients require pain relief. Yet only 40% of the respondents routinely conducted pain assessments among cancer patients, while 51% only treated when patients complained of pain. Concerning the type of analgesic commonly used for cancer patients, 43% used weak opioids, 32% used NSAIDs, and only 20% used strong opioids. Seventy-five respondents (91.5%) had no formal training on pain management.

Conclusion: The knowledge of pain management for cancer patients among medical personnel at the Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital appears to be elementary. We recommend that formal training in the form of lectures, seminars, and workshops on cancer pain management should be part of continuing medical education in low-resource settings like the Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus