Limits...
Effects of the antioxidant sulforaphane on hyperlocomotion and prepulse inhibition deficits in mice after phencyclidine administration.

Shirai Y, Fujita Y, Hashimoto K - Clin Psychopharmacol Neurosci (2012)

Bottom Line: This study was undertaken to examine the effects of the potent antioxidant sulforaphane (SFN), found in cruciferous vegetables, on behavioral abnormalities (e.g., hyperlocomotion and prepulse inhibition [PPI] deficits) in mice after a single administration of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP).These results suggest that SFN has antipsychotic activity in an animal model of schizophrenia.Therefore, it is likely that SFN may be a potential therapeutic drug for schizophrenia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Accumulating evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and that the potent antioxidants may be potential therapeutic drugs for schizophrenia. This study was undertaken to examine the effects of the potent antioxidant sulforaphane (SFN), found in cruciferous vegetables, on behavioral abnormalities (e.g., hyperlocomotion and prepulse inhibition [PPI] deficits) in mice after a single administration of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP).

Methods: Effects of SFN (3, 10, and 30 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.]) on hyperlocomotion and PPI deficits in the adult male ddY mice after administration of PCP (3.0 mg/kg, subcutaneously [s.c.]) were examined.

Results: Administration of SFN (30 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.]), but not low doses (3 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.), significantly attenuated hyperlocomotion in mice after PCP administration (3.0 mg/kg, subcutaneously [s.c.]). Furthermore, administration of SFN (3, 10, and 30 mg/kg, i.p.) attenuated the PPI deficits in mice after PCP administration (3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) in a dose-dependent manner.

Conclusion: These results suggest that SFN has antipsychotic activity in an animal model of schizophrenia. Therefore, it is likely that SFN may be a potential therapeutic drug for schizophrenia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of sulforaphane (SFN) on phencyclidine (PCP)-induced hyperlocomotion in mice. Thirty minutes after a single intraperitoneally administration of vehicle (10 ml/kg), or SFN (3.0, 10 or 30 mg/kg), PCP (3 mg/kg) or vehicle (10 ml/kg) was administered subcutaneously into the mice. Behavior (locomotion) in the mice was evaluated for 2 hours after administration of PCP. Each value is the mean±standard error of the mean (n=8 per group). ***p<0.001 as compared with the vehicle+PCP group.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569145&req=5

Figure 2: Effect of sulforaphane (SFN) on phencyclidine (PCP)-induced hyperlocomotion in mice. Thirty minutes after a single intraperitoneally administration of vehicle (10 ml/kg), or SFN (3.0, 10 or 30 mg/kg), PCP (3 mg/kg) or vehicle (10 ml/kg) was administered subcutaneously into the mice. Behavior (locomotion) in the mice was evaluated for 2 hours after administration of PCP. Each value is the mean±standard error of the mean (n=8 per group). ***p<0.001 as compared with the vehicle+PCP group.

Mentions: A single administration of PCP (3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) markedly increased locomotion in mice. The one-way ANOVA revealed significant differences among the six groups (F [5, 42]=14.18, p<0.001]. Pretreatment with SFN (30 mg/kg), but not low doses (3 and 10 mg/kg), significantly (p<0.001) attenuated PCP-induced hyperlocomotion in mice (Fig. 2). In contrast, administration of SFN (30 mg/kg) alone did not affect spontaneous locomotion in mice.


Effects of the antioxidant sulforaphane on hyperlocomotion and prepulse inhibition deficits in mice after phencyclidine administration.

Shirai Y, Fujita Y, Hashimoto K - Clin Psychopharmacol Neurosci (2012)

Effect of sulforaphane (SFN) on phencyclidine (PCP)-induced hyperlocomotion in mice. Thirty minutes after a single intraperitoneally administration of vehicle (10 ml/kg), or SFN (3.0, 10 or 30 mg/kg), PCP (3 mg/kg) or vehicle (10 ml/kg) was administered subcutaneously into the mice. Behavior (locomotion) in the mice was evaluated for 2 hours after administration of PCP. Each value is the mean±standard error of the mean (n=8 per group). ***p<0.001 as compared with the vehicle+PCP group.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569145&req=5

Figure 2: Effect of sulforaphane (SFN) on phencyclidine (PCP)-induced hyperlocomotion in mice. Thirty minutes after a single intraperitoneally administration of vehicle (10 ml/kg), or SFN (3.0, 10 or 30 mg/kg), PCP (3 mg/kg) or vehicle (10 ml/kg) was administered subcutaneously into the mice. Behavior (locomotion) in the mice was evaluated for 2 hours after administration of PCP. Each value is the mean±standard error of the mean (n=8 per group). ***p<0.001 as compared with the vehicle+PCP group.
Mentions: A single administration of PCP (3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) markedly increased locomotion in mice. The one-way ANOVA revealed significant differences among the six groups (F [5, 42]=14.18, p<0.001]. Pretreatment with SFN (30 mg/kg), but not low doses (3 and 10 mg/kg), significantly (p<0.001) attenuated PCP-induced hyperlocomotion in mice (Fig. 2). In contrast, administration of SFN (30 mg/kg) alone did not affect spontaneous locomotion in mice.

Bottom Line: This study was undertaken to examine the effects of the potent antioxidant sulforaphane (SFN), found in cruciferous vegetables, on behavioral abnormalities (e.g., hyperlocomotion and prepulse inhibition [PPI] deficits) in mice after a single administration of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP).These results suggest that SFN has antipsychotic activity in an animal model of schizophrenia.Therefore, it is likely that SFN may be a potential therapeutic drug for schizophrenia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Accumulating evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and that the potent antioxidants may be potential therapeutic drugs for schizophrenia. This study was undertaken to examine the effects of the potent antioxidant sulforaphane (SFN), found in cruciferous vegetables, on behavioral abnormalities (e.g., hyperlocomotion and prepulse inhibition [PPI] deficits) in mice after a single administration of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP).

Methods: Effects of SFN (3, 10, and 30 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.]) on hyperlocomotion and PPI deficits in the adult male ddY mice after administration of PCP (3.0 mg/kg, subcutaneously [s.c.]) were examined.

Results: Administration of SFN (30 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.]), but not low doses (3 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.), significantly attenuated hyperlocomotion in mice after PCP administration (3.0 mg/kg, subcutaneously [s.c.]). Furthermore, administration of SFN (3, 10, and 30 mg/kg, i.p.) attenuated the PPI deficits in mice after PCP administration (3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) in a dose-dependent manner.

Conclusion: These results suggest that SFN has antipsychotic activity in an animal model of schizophrenia. Therefore, it is likely that SFN may be a potential therapeutic drug for schizophrenia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus