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The neural basis of nonvisual object recognition memory in the rat.

Albasser MM, Olarte-Sánchez CM, Amin E, Horne MR, Newton MJ, Warburton EC, Aggleton JP - Behav. Neurosci. (2012)

Bottom Line: The hippocampal findings prompted Experiment 2.Across two replications, no evidence was found that hippocampal lesions impair nonvisual object recognition.These findings reveal a network of linked c-fos activations that share superficial features with those associated with visual recognition but differ in the fine details; for example, in the locus of the perirhinal cortex activation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, UK.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic drawing showing a plan, with dimensions, of the bow-tie maze. From “Qualitatively different modes of perirhinal-hippocampal engagement when rats explore novel vs. familiar objects as revealed by c-fos imaging” by M. Albasser, G. L. Poirier, and J. P. Aggleton, 2010European Journal of Neuroscience, 31, 134-147. Copyright [2009] by John Wiley and Sons. Adapted with permission.
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fig1: Schematic drawing showing a plan, with dimensions, of the bow-tie maze. From “Qualitatively different modes of perirhinal-hippocampal engagement when rats explore novel vs. familiar objects as revealed by c-fos imaging” by M. Albasser, G. L. Poirier, and J. P. Aggleton, 2010European Journal of Neuroscience, 31, 134-147. Copyright [2009] by John Wiley and Sons. Adapted with permission.

Mentions: All training and testing was in a bow-tie shaped maze (see Figure 1) made with steel walls and a wooden floor (see Albasser, Chapman et al., 2010). The maze was 120 cm long, 50 cm wide, and 50 cm high. Each end of the apparatus was triangular, the apices of which were joined by a narrow corridor (12 cm wide). An opaque sliding door set in the middle of the corridor could be raised by the experimenter. The far wall of each triangle contained two recessed food wells, 3.5 cm in diameter and 2 cm deep. The food wells were separated by a short, opaque dividing wall that protruded 15 cm from the middle of the end wall. This wall ensured that the rats could not explore both objects at the same time, for example, with their vibrissae. Even so, all rats could readily step around the wall to reach the object on the other side. All food wells were covered by objects in the experiment proper.


The neural basis of nonvisual object recognition memory in the rat.

Albasser MM, Olarte-Sánchez CM, Amin E, Horne MR, Newton MJ, Warburton EC, Aggleton JP - Behav. Neurosci. (2012)

Schematic drawing showing a plan, with dimensions, of the bow-tie maze. From “Qualitatively different modes of perirhinal-hippocampal engagement when rats explore novel vs. familiar objects as revealed by c-fos imaging” by M. Albasser, G. L. Poirier, and J. P. Aggleton, 2010European Journal of Neuroscience, 31, 134-147. Copyright [2009] by John Wiley and Sons. Adapted with permission.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3569044&req=5

fig1: Schematic drawing showing a plan, with dimensions, of the bow-tie maze. From “Qualitatively different modes of perirhinal-hippocampal engagement when rats explore novel vs. familiar objects as revealed by c-fos imaging” by M. Albasser, G. L. Poirier, and J. P. Aggleton, 2010European Journal of Neuroscience, 31, 134-147. Copyright [2009] by John Wiley and Sons. Adapted with permission.
Mentions: All training and testing was in a bow-tie shaped maze (see Figure 1) made with steel walls and a wooden floor (see Albasser, Chapman et al., 2010). The maze was 120 cm long, 50 cm wide, and 50 cm high. Each end of the apparatus was triangular, the apices of which were joined by a narrow corridor (12 cm wide). An opaque sliding door set in the middle of the corridor could be raised by the experimenter. The far wall of each triangle contained two recessed food wells, 3.5 cm in diameter and 2 cm deep. The food wells were separated by a short, opaque dividing wall that protruded 15 cm from the middle of the end wall. This wall ensured that the rats could not explore both objects at the same time, for example, with their vibrissae. Even so, all rats could readily step around the wall to reach the object on the other side. All food wells were covered by objects in the experiment proper.

Bottom Line: The hippocampal findings prompted Experiment 2.Across two replications, no evidence was found that hippocampal lesions impair nonvisual object recognition.These findings reveal a network of linked c-fos activations that share superficial features with those associated with visual recognition but differ in the fine details; for example, in the locus of the perirhinal cortex activation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus