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Efficacy of single dose of an inactivated porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) whole-virus vaccine with oil adjuvant in piglets.

Yang K, Li W, Niu H, Yan W, Liu X, Wang Y, Cheng S, Ku X, He Q - Acta Vet. Scand. (2012)

Bottom Line: Inactivation of the virus was accomplished using a standard formalin inactivation protocol.By 28 days post-vaccination (DPV), Groups 1 and 2 were challenged intranasally and intramuscularly with 5 × 107 TCID50 of a virulent PCV2 isolate.Furthermore, pathological lesions and viremia were milder in the vaccinated group.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) associated with PCV2 is one of the most costly diseases currently faced by the swine industry. The development of effective vaccines against PCV2 infection has been accepted as an important strategy in the prophylaxis of PMWS.

Methods: In the present study, a PK-15 cell-adapted formalin-inactivated prototype vaccine candidate was prepared using a strain of PCV2 from China. Inactivation of the virus was accomplished using a standard formalin inactivation protocol. The protective properties of the inactivated PCV2 vaccine were evaluated in piglets. Ten 28-day-old pigs were randomly assigned to two groups, each with five. Group 1 was vaccinated intramuscularly with the inactivated virus preparation; Group 2 received sterile PBS as a placebo. By 28 days post-vaccination (DPV), Groups 1 and 2 were challenged intranasally and intramuscularly with 5 × 107 TCID50 of a virulent PCV2 isolate.

Results: The vaccinated pigs seroconverted to PCV2 and had high levels of serum antibodies to PCV2 at 28 days after vaccination, whereas the control pigs remained seronegative. No significant signs of clinical disease were recorded following the challenge with PCV2, but moderate amounts of PCV2 antigen were detected in most lymphoid organs of the control pigs. PCV2 was detected in two out of the five vaccinated pigs. Furthermore, pathological lesions and viremia were milder in the vaccinated group.

Conclusions: The obtained results indicate that the inactivated PCV2 virus vaccine with an oil adjuvant induce an immunological response in pigs that appears to provide protection from infection with PCV2. The vaccine, therefore, may have the potential to serve as a vaccine aimed to protect pigs from developing PMWS.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

PCV2-specific antibody detection by ELISA. ELISA assay for PCV2-specific antibodies in the serum of vaccinated and non-vaccinated pigs from day 28 pre-challenge to day 28 post-challenge. (**) Indicates significantly (P < 0.01) higher PCV2-specific antibody titers in the vaccinated pigs than in the challenge control pigs.
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Figure 1: PCV2-specific antibody detection by ELISA. ELISA assay for PCV2-specific antibodies in the serum of vaccinated and non-vaccinated pigs from day 28 pre-challenge to day 28 post-challenge. (**) Indicates significantly (P < 0.01) higher PCV2-specific antibody titers in the vaccinated pigs than in the challenge control pigs.

Mentions: The evolution of the ELISA titers to PCV2 in the vaccinated and non-vaccinated pigs is displayed in Figure1. Both groups were seronegative for PCV2 when vaccinated on day 0. At the time of the challenge, which was 28 days later, the vaccinated pigs had seroconverted to PCV2 and had significantly (p < 0.05) higher titers of antibodies against PCV2 than the control pigs. Both groups had increased levels of serum antibodies against PCV2 following the challenge, and the non-vaccinated control pigs seroconverted to PCV2 between 14 and 28 days post-challenge (days 42 to 56).


Efficacy of single dose of an inactivated porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) whole-virus vaccine with oil adjuvant in piglets.

Yang K, Li W, Niu H, Yan W, Liu X, Wang Y, Cheng S, Ku X, He Q - Acta Vet. Scand. (2012)

PCV2-specific antibody detection by ELISA. ELISA assay for PCV2-specific antibodies in the serum of vaccinated and non-vaccinated pigs from day 28 pre-challenge to day 28 post-challenge. (**) Indicates significantly (P < 0.01) higher PCV2-specific antibody titers in the vaccinated pigs than in the challenge control pigs.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539982&req=5

Figure 1: PCV2-specific antibody detection by ELISA. ELISA assay for PCV2-specific antibodies in the serum of vaccinated and non-vaccinated pigs from day 28 pre-challenge to day 28 post-challenge. (**) Indicates significantly (P < 0.01) higher PCV2-specific antibody titers in the vaccinated pigs than in the challenge control pigs.
Mentions: The evolution of the ELISA titers to PCV2 in the vaccinated and non-vaccinated pigs is displayed in Figure1. Both groups were seronegative for PCV2 when vaccinated on day 0. At the time of the challenge, which was 28 days later, the vaccinated pigs had seroconverted to PCV2 and had significantly (p < 0.05) higher titers of antibodies against PCV2 than the control pigs. Both groups had increased levels of serum antibodies against PCV2 following the challenge, and the non-vaccinated control pigs seroconverted to PCV2 between 14 and 28 days post-challenge (days 42 to 56).

Bottom Line: Inactivation of the virus was accomplished using a standard formalin inactivation protocol.By 28 days post-vaccination (DPV), Groups 1 and 2 were challenged intranasally and intramuscularly with 5 × 107 TCID50 of a virulent PCV2 isolate.Furthermore, pathological lesions and viremia were milder in the vaccinated group.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) associated with PCV2 is one of the most costly diseases currently faced by the swine industry. The development of effective vaccines against PCV2 infection has been accepted as an important strategy in the prophylaxis of PMWS.

Methods: In the present study, a PK-15 cell-adapted formalin-inactivated prototype vaccine candidate was prepared using a strain of PCV2 from China. Inactivation of the virus was accomplished using a standard formalin inactivation protocol. The protective properties of the inactivated PCV2 vaccine were evaluated in piglets. Ten 28-day-old pigs were randomly assigned to two groups, each with five. Group 1 was vaccinated intramuscularly with the inactivated virus preparation; Group 2 received sterile PBS as a placebo. By 28 days post-vaccination (DPV), Groups 1 and 2 were challenged intranasally and intramuscularly with 5 × 107 TCID50 of a virulent PCV2 isolate.

Results: The vaccinated pigs seroconverted to PCV2 and had high levels of serum antibodies to PCV2 at 28 days after vaccination, whereas the control pigs remained seronegative. No significant signs of clinical disease were recorded following the challenge with PCV2, but moderate amounts of PCV2 antigen were detected in most lymphoid organs of the control pigs. PCV2 was detected in two out of the five vaccinated pigs. Furthermore, pathological lesions and viremia were milder in the vaccinated group.

Conclusions: The obtained results indicate that the inactivated PCV2 virus vaccine with an oil adjuvant induce an immunological response in pigs that appears to provide protection from infection with PCV2. The vaccine, therefore, may have the potential to serve as a vaccine aimed to protect pigs from developing PMWS.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus