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The cancer multi-disciplinary team from the coordinators' perspective: results from a national survey in the UK.

Jalil R, Lamb B, Russ S, Sevdalis N, Green JS - BMC Health Serv Res (2012)

Bottom Line: What is apparent is that the coordinator's work is pivotal to the effectiveness and efficiency of an MDT.More than one third of the respondents felt that the job plan does not reflect their actual duties.Improving the resources and training available to MDT-coordinators can give them an opportunity to develop the required additional skills and contribute to improved MDT performance and ultimately cancer care.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Imperial College, London, UK. r.jalil@imperial.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: The MDT-Coordinators' role is relatively new, and as such it is evolving. What is apparent is that the coordinator's work is pivotal to the effectiveness and efficiency of an MDT. This study aimed to assess the views and needs of MDT-coordinators.

Methods: Views of MDT-coordinators were evaluated through an online survey that covered their current practice and role, MDT chairing, opinions on how to improve MDT meetings, and coordinators' educational/training needs.

Results: 265 coordinators responded to the survey. More than one third of the respondents felt that the job plan does not reflect their actual duties. It was reported that medical members of the MDT always contribute to case discussions. 66.9% of the respondents reported that the MDTs are chaired by Surgeons. The majority reported having training on data management and IT skills but more than 50% reported that they felt further training is needed in areas of Oncology, Anatomy and physiology, audit and research, peer-review, and leadership skills.

Conclusions: MDT-Coordinators' role is central to the care of cancer patients. The study reveals areas of training requirements that remain unmet. Improving the resources and training available to MDT-coordinators can give them an opportunity to develop the required additional skills and contribute to improved MDT performance and ultimately cancer care. Finally, this study looks forward to the impact of the recent launch of a new e-learning training programme for MDT coordinators and discusses implications for future research.

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Respondents views on disagreement with MDT plan.
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Figure 1: Respondents views on disagreement with MDT plan.

Mentions: Respondents felt that medical members of the MDT (e.g., surgeons (41.5%), oncologists (32.8%)) always contribute to case discussions, whilst nurses nearly always (18%) contribute, and MDT Coordinators sometimes contribute (15.8%). Regarding the weight that the opinions of different MDT members have in deciding treatment decisions, surgeons’ opinions were deemed to always carry weight (23.4%), those of oncologists nearly always (13.2%), radiologists usually (11.3%), pathologists and nurses sometimes (12.1% and 17.7% respectively), and MDT coordinators never (37.7%). Nearly half of the Respondents felt that disagreements do not happen very often (Figure 1).


The cancer multi-disciplinary team from the coordinators' perspective: results from a national survey in the UK.

Jalil R, Lamb B, Russ S, Sevdalis N, Green JS - BMC Health Serv Res (2012)

Respondents views on disagreement with MDT plan.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539898&req=5

Figure 1: Respondents views on disagreement with MDT plan.
Mentions: Respondents felt that medical members of the MDT (e.g., surgeons (41.5%), oncologists (32.8%)) always contribute to case discussions, whilst nurses nearly always (18%) contribute, and MDT Coordinators sometimes contribute (15.8%). Regarding the weight that the opinions of different MDT members have in deciding treatment decisions, surgeons’ opinions were deemed to always carry weight (23.4%), those of oncologists nearly always (13.2%), radiologists usually (11.3%), pathologists and nurses sometimes (12.1% and 17.7% respectively), and MDT coordinators never (37.7%). Nearly half of the Respondents felt that disagreements do not happen very often (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: What is apparent is that the coordinator's work is pivotal to the effectiveness and efficiency of an MDT.More than one third of the respondents felt that the job plan does not reflect their actual duties.Improving the resources and training available to MDT-coordinators can give them an opportunity to develop the required additional skills and contribute to improved MDT performance and ultimately cancer care.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Imperial College, London, UK. r.jalil@imperial.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: The MDT-Coordinators' role is relatively new, and as such it is evolving. What is apparent is that the coordinator's work is pivotal to the effectiveness and efficiency of an MDT. This study aimed to assess the views and needs of MDT-coordinators.

Methods: Views of MDT-coordinators were evaluated through an online survey that covered their current practice and role, MDT chairing, opinions on how to improve MDT meetings, and coordinators' educational/training needs.

Results: 265 coordinators responded to the survey. More than one third of the respondents felt that the job plan does not reflect their actual duties. It was reported that medical members of the MDT always contribute to case discussions. 66.9% of the respondents reported that the MDTs are chaired by Surgeons. The majority reported having training on data management and IT skills but more than 50% reported that they felt further training is needed in areas of Oncology, Anatomy and physiology, audit and research, peer-review, and leadership skills.

Conclusions: MDT-Coordinators' role is central to the care of cancer patients. The study reveals areas of training requirements that remain unmet. Improving the resources and training available to MDT-coordinators can give them an opportunity to develop the required additional skills and contribute to improved MDT performance and ultimately cancer care. Finally, this study looks forward to the impact of the recent launch of a new e-learning training programme for MDT coordinators and discusses implications for future research.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus