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A survey of plants and plant products traditionally used in livestock health management in Buuri district, Meru County, Kenya.

Gakuubi MM, Wanzala W - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2012)

Bottom Line: Of these families, Fabaceae had the highest number of species (16.67%), followed by Solanaceae (12.5%), Asteraceae and Euphorbiacea (each comprising 8.33%), Lamiaceae (6.25%), Apocynaceae and Boraginaceae (each comprising 4.17%), while the rest of the 19 families, each was represented by a single plant species.The study showed that there was a rich knowledge and ethnopractices for traditional animal healthcare amongst the Ameru.This study therefore provides some groundwork for elucidating the efficacy of some of these plants, plant products and ethnopractices in managing livestock health as further research may lead to discovery of useful ethnopharmaceutical agents applicable in livestock industry.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Natural Sciences, Faculty of Science, The Catholic University of Eastern Africa, P.O. Box 62157-00200, Nairobi, Kenya.

ABSTRACT

Background: Up till now, nomadic communities in Africa have been the primary focus of ethnoveterinary research. Although mainly arable and/or mixed arable/pastoral farmers, Ameru of central Kenya are known to have a rich history of ethnoveterinary knowledge. Their collective and accumulative ethnoveterinary knowledge (EVK) is likely to be just as rich and worth documenting. The aim of the study was to document and analyse the ethnoveterinary knowledge of the Ameru.

Methods: Non-alienating, dialogic, participatory action research (PAR) and participatory rural appraisal (PRA) approaches involving 21 women and men aged between 50 and 79 years old were utilized. A combination of snowball and purposive sampling methods were used to select 21 key respondents. The methods comprised a set of triangulation approach needed in EVK for non-experimental validation of ethnoknowledge of the Ameru.

Results: A total of 48 plant species distributed in 26 families were documented with details of diseases/ill-health conditions, parts of plants used and form of preparation and administration methods applied to different animal groups. Of these families, Fabaceae had the highest number of species (16.67%), followed by Solanaceae (12.5%), Asteraceae and Euphorbiacea (each comprising 8.33%), Lamiaceae (6.25%), Apocynaceae and Boraginaceae (each comprising 4.17%), while the rest of the 19 families, each was represented by a single plant species. About 30 livestock diseases/ill-health conditions were described, each treated by at least one of the 48 plant species. Most prevalent diseases/ill-health conditions included: - anaplasmosis, diarrhea, East Coast fever, pneumonia, helminthiasis, general weakness and skin diseases involving wounds caused by ectoparasites.

Conclusion: The study showed that there was a rich knowledge and ethnopractices for traditional animal healthcare amongst the Ameru. This study therefore provides some groundwork for elucidating the efficacy of some of these plants, plant products and ethnopractices in managing livestock health as further research may lead to discovery of useful ethnopharmaceutical agents applicable in livestock industry.

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Respondent consensus factor for the main cattle diseases traditionally treated using plants and plant products in Buuri district, Meru County, Kenya.
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Figure 8: Respondent consensus factor for the main cattle diseases traditionally treated using plants and plant products in Buuri district, Meru County, Kenya.

Mentions: Based on the reports from different respondents and looking at the numbers of ethnoformulation preparations described for each category of animal species, livestock farming may be one of the most important types of farming activities practiced by many farmers in the study area (Table1). Cattle have a high socio-economic value and are a source of food, cash, manure, labour (ploughing and cart oxen) and as a means of dowry payment[4,5]. For this reason therefore, the interviewer sought to establish the key respondent consensus factor (Frc) for the main cattle diseases treated using different plants and plant products in Buuri district using formula (ii) and the results obtained are shown in Figure8. The cattle disease that obtained the highest Frc value was ECF (0.91) followed by anaplasmosis (0.87) and diarrhea (0.67) in that order. These are the most commonly encountered and perhaps well diagnosed diseases by traditional animal healthcare providers in the study area. The lowest Frc value was obtained for pneumonia (0.4). Diseases with low Frc values may be either new in the area or poorly diagnosed by the traditional animal healthcare providers. The Frc defined how homogeneous the information was by the degree of consensus in key respondents’ responses.


A survey of plants and plant products traditionally used in livestock health management in Buuri district, Meru County, Kenya.

Gakuubi MM, Wanzala W - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2012)

Respondent consensus factor for the main cattle diseases traditionally treated using plants and plant products in Buuri district, Meru County, Kenya.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539861&req=5

Figure 8: Respondent consensus factor for the main cattle diseases traditionally treated using plants and plant products in Buuri district, Meru County, Kenya.
Mentions: Based on the reports from different respondents and looking at the numbers of ethnoformulation preparations described for each category of animal species, livestock farming may be one of the most important types of farming activities practiced by many farmers in the study area (Table1). Cattle have a high socio-economic value and are a source of food, cash, manure, labour (ploughing and cart oxen) and as a means of dowry payment[4,5]. For this reason therefore, the interviewer sought to establish the key respondent consensus factor (Frc) for the main cattle diseases treated using different plants and plant products in Buuri district using formula (ii) and the results obtained are shown in Figure8. The cattle disease that obtained the highest Frc value was ECF (0.91) followed by anaplasmosis (0.87) and diarrhea (0.67) in that order. These are the most commonly encountered and perhaps well diagnosed diseases by traditional animal healthcare providers in the study area. The lowest Frc value was obtained for pneumonia (0.4). Diseases with low Frc values may be either new in the area or poorly diagnosed by the traditional animal healthcare providers. The Frc defined how homogeneous the information was by the degree of consensus in key respondents’ responses.

Bottom Line: Of these families, Fabaceae had the highest number of species (16.67%), followed by Solanaceae (12.5%), Asteraceae and Euphorbiacea (each comprising 8.33%), Lamiaceae (6.25%), Apocynaceae and Boraginaceae (each comprising 4.17%), while the rest of the 19 families, each was represented by a single plant species.The study showed that there was a rich knowledge and ethnopractices for traditional animal healthcare amongst the Ameru.This study therefore provides some groundwork for elucidating the efficacy of some of these plants, plant products and ethnopractices in managing livestock health as further research may lead to discovery of useful ethnopharmaceutical agents applicable in livestock industry.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Natural Sciences, Faculty of Science, The Catholic University of Eastern Africa, P.O. Box 62157-00200, Nairobi, Kenya.

ABSTRACT

Background: Up till now, nomadic communities in Africa have been the primary focus of ethnoveterinary research. Although mainly arable and/or mixed arable/pastoral farmers, Ameru of central Kenya are known to have a rich history of ethnoveterinary knowledge. Their collective and accumulative ethnoveterinary knowledge (EVK) is likely to be just as rich and worth documenting. The aim of the study was to document and analyse the ethnoveterinary knowledge of the Ameru.

Methods: Non-alienating, dialogic, participatory action research (PAR) and participatory rural appraisal (PRA) approaches involving 21 women and men aged between 50 and 79 years old were utilized. A combination of snowball and purposive sampling methods were used to select 21 key respondents. The methods comprised a set of triangulation approach needed in EVK for non-experimental validation of ethnoknowledge of the Ameru.

Results: A total of 48 plant species distributed in 26 families were documented with details of diseases/ill-health conditions, parts of plants used and form of preparation and administration methods applied to different animal groups. Of these families, Fabaceae had the highest number of species (16.67%), followed by Solanaceae (12.5%), Asteraceae and Euphorbiacea (each comprising 8.33%), Lamiaceae (6.25%), Apocynaceae and Boraginaceae (each comprising 4.17%), while the rest of the 19 families, each was represented by a single plant species. About 30 livestock diseases/ill-health conditions were described, each treated by at least one of the 48 plant species. Most prevalent diseases/ill-health conditions included: - anaplasmosis, diarrhea, East Coast fever, pneumonia, helminthiasis, general weakness and skin diseases involving wounds caused by ectoparasites.

Conclusion: The study showed that there was a rich knowledge and ethnopractices for traditional animal healthcare amongst the Ameru. This study therefore provides some groundwork for elucidating the efficacy of some of these plants, plant products and ethnopractices in managing livestock health as further research may lead to discovery of useful ethnopharmaceutical agents applicable in livestock industry.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus