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A survey of plants and plant products traditionally used in livestock health management in Buuri district, Meru County, Kenya.

Gakuubi MM, Wanzala W - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2012)

Bottom Line: Of these families, Fabaceae had the highest number of species (16.67%), followed by Solanaceae (12.5%), Asteraceae and Euphorbiacea (each comprising 8.33%), Lamiaceae (6.25%), Apocynaceae and Boraginaceae (each comprising 4.17%), while the rest of the 19 families, each was represented by a single plant species.The study showed that there was a rich knowledge and ethnopractices for traditional animal healthcare amongst the Ameru.This study therefore provides some groundwork for elucidating the efficacy of some of these plants, plant products and ethnopractices in managing livestock health as further research may lead to discovery of useful ethnopharmaceutical agents applicable in livestock industry.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Natural Sciences, Faculty of Science, The Catholic University of Eastern Africa, P.O. Box 62157-00200, Nairobi, Kenya.

ABSTRACT

Background: Up till now, nomadic communities in Africa have been the primary focus of ethnoveterinary research. Although mainly arable and/or mixed arable/pastoral farmers, Ameru of central Kenya are known to have a rich history of ethnoveterinary knowledge. Their collective and accumulative ethnoveterinary knowledge (EVK) is likely to be just as rich and worth documenting. The aim of the study was to document and analyse the ethnoveterinary knowledge of the Ameru.

Methods: Non-alienating, dialogic, participatory action research (PAR) and participatory rural appraisal (PRA) approaches involving 21 women and men aged between 50 and 79 years old were utilized. A combination of snowball and purposive sampling methods were used to select 21 key respondents. The methods comprised a set of triangulation approach needed in EVK for non-experimental validation of ethnoknowledge of the Ameru.

Results: A total of 48 plant species distributed in 26 families were documented with details of diseases/ill-health conditions, parts of plants used and form of preparation and administration methods applied to different animal groups. Of these families, Fabaceae had the highest number of species (16.67%), followed by Solanaceae (12.5%), Asteraceae and Euphorbiacea (each comprising 8.33%), Lamiaceae (6.25%), Apocynaceae and Boraginaceae (each comprising 4.17%), while the rest of the 19 families, each was represented by a single plant species. About 30 livestock diseases/ill-health conditions were described, each treated by at least one of the 48 plant species. Most prevalent diseases/ill-health conditions included: - anaplasmosis, diarrhea, East Coast fever, pneumonia, helminthiasis, general weakness and skin diseases involving wounds caused by ectoparasites.

Conclusion: The study showed that there was a rich knowledge and ethnopractices for traditional animal healthcare amongst the Ameru. This study therefore provides some groundwork for elucidating the efficacy of some of these plants, plant products and ethnopractices in managing livestock health as further research may lead to discovery of useful ethnopharmaceutical agents applicable in livestock industry.

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Percent distribution of plant parts used in ethnoveterinary medicine in Buuri district, Meru County, Kenya.
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Figure 3: Percent distribution of plant parts used in ethnoveterinary medicine in Buuri district, Meru County, Kenya.

Mentions: In regard to the part(s) of plants harvested and used in ethnoveterinary medicine in Buuri district, the study revealed that the most frequently utilized part of the plant was the leaf accounting for 34.8% of the total reported ethnoformulation preparations followed by the root (22.7%), bark (18.2%), seed/fruit (15.2%), latex (3%) and bulb, flower and stem each accounted for 1.5% of the total reported ethnoformulation preparations in that order (Figure3). These results are in an agreement with the previous findings of Amri and Kisangau[72], who conducted a similar survey study in villages surrounding Kimboza forest reserve in Tanzania but were contrary to the findings of Rukia[73]. Leaves from plants therefore appear to be the most preferred harvested parts of plants by ethnopractitioners for us in ethnomedicines[6]. Putting into consideration the biological function of the leaves on plants, the method of harvesting medicinal plants by picking leaves can be very devastating and a threat to the survival of the target plant, more particularly, if the young tender leaves are harvested instead of the old ones, which are almost dropping off the plant to become humus. Similarly, frequent harvesting of roots and barks, the second most preferred parts of plants (Figure4), may be destructive and unsustainable, thus risking the extinction of the target plant species, and is therefore not advisable[74,75].


A survey of plants and plant products traditionally used in livestock health management in Buuri district, Meru County, Kenya.

Gakuubi MM, Wanzala W - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2012)

Percent distribution of plant parts used in ethnoveterinary medicine in Buuri district, Meru County, Kenya.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539861&req=5

Figure 3: Percent distribution of plant parts used in ethnoveterinary medicine in Buuri district, Meru County, Kenya.
Mentions: In regard to the part(s) of plants harvested and used in ethnoveterinary medicine in Buuri district, the study revealed that the most frequently utilized part of the plant was the leaf accounting for 34.8% of the total reported ethnoformulation preparations followed by the root (22.7%), bark (18.2%), seed/fruit (15.2%), latex (3%) and bulb, flower and stem each accounted for 1.5% of the total reported ethnoformulation preparations in that order (Figure3). These results are in an agreement with the previous findings of Amri and Kisangau[72], who conducted a similar survey study in villages surrounding Kimboza forest reserve in Tanzania but were contrary to the findings of Rukia[73]. Leaves from plants therefore appear to be the most preferred harvested parts of plants by ethnopractitioners for us in ethnomedicines[6]. Putting into consideration the biological function of the leaves on plants, the method of harvesting medicinal plants by picking leaves can be very devastating and a threat to the survival of the target plant, more particularly, if the young tender leaves are harvested instead of the old ones, which are almost dropping off the plant to become humus. Similarly, frequent harvesting of roots and barks, the second most preferred parts of plants (Figure4), may be destructive and unsustainable, thus risking the extinction of the target plant species, and is therefore not advisable[74,75].

Bottom Line: Of these families, Fabaceae had the highest number of species (16.67%), followed by Solanaceae (12.5%), Asteraceae and Euphorbiacea (each comprising 8.33%), Lamiaceae (6.25%), Apocynaceae and Boraginaceae (each comprising 4.17%), while the rest of the 19 families, each was represented by a single plant species.The study showed that there was a rich knowledge and ethnopractices for traditional animal healthcare amongst the Ameru.This study therefore provides some groundwork for elucidating the efficacy of some of these plants, plant products and ethnopractices in managing livestock health as further research may lead to discovery of useful ethnopharmaceutical agents applicable in livestock industry.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Natural Sciences, Faculty of Science, The Catholic University of Eastern Africa, P.O. Box 62157-00200, Nairobi, Kenya.

ABSTRACT

Background: Up till now, nomadic communities in Africa have been the primary focus of ethnoveterinary research. Although mainly arable and/or mixed arable/pastoral farmers, Ameru of central Kenya are known to have a rich history of ethnoveterinary knowledge. Their collective and accumulative ethnoveterinary knowledge (EVK) is likely to be just as rich and worth documenting. The aim of the study was to document and analyse the ethnoveterinary knowledge of the Ameru.

Methods: Non-alienating, dialogic, participatory action research (PAR) and participatory rural appraisal (PRA) approaches involving 21 women and men aged between 50 and 79 years old were utilized. A combination of snowball and purposive sampling methods were used to select 21 key respondents. The methods comprised a set of triangulation approach needed in EVK for non-experimental validation of ethnoknowledge of the Ameru.

Results: A total of 48 plant species distributed in 26 families were documented with details of diseases/ill-health conditions, parts of plants used and form of preparation and administration methods applied to different animal groups. Of these families, Fabaceae had the highest number of species (16.67%), followed by Solanaceae (12.5%), Asteraceae and Euphorbiacea (each comprising 8.33%), Lamiaceae (6.25%), Apocynaceae and Boraginaceae (each comprising 4.17%), while the rest of the 19 families, each was represented by a single plant species. About 30 livestock diseases/ill-health conditions were described, each treated by at least one of the 48 plant species. Most prevalent diseases/ill-health conditions included: - anaplasmosis, diarrhea, East Coast fever, pneumonia, helminthiasis, general weakness and skin diseases involving wounds caused by ectoparasites.

Conclusion: The study showed that there was a rich knowledge and ethnopractices for traditional animal healthcare amongst the Ameru. This study therefore provides some groundwork for elucidating the efficacy of some of these plants, plant products and ethnopractices in managing livestock health as further research may lead to discovery of useful ethnopharmaceutical agents applicable in livestock industry.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus