Limits...
Developmental regulation of spatio-temporal patterns of cortical circuit activation.

Griffen TC, Wang L, Fontanini A, Maffei A - Front Cell Neurosci (2013)

Bottom Line: However, while from eye opening to the peak of the critical period, the amplitude and persistence of the voltage signal decrease, peak activation is reached more quickly and the interlaminar gain increases with age.The lateral spread of activation within layers remains unchanged throughout the time window under analysis.Signals become more efficiently propagated across layers through developmentally regulated changes in interlaminar gain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Program in Neuroscience, Stony Brook University Stony Brook, NY, USA ; Medical Scientist Training Program, Stony Brook University Stony Brook, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Neural circuits are refined in an experience-dependent manner during early postnatal development. How development modulates the spatio-temporal propagation of activity through cortical circuits is poorly understood. Here we use voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSD) to show that there are significant changes in the spatio-temporal patterns of intracortical signals in primary visual cortex (V1) from postnatal day 13 (P13), eye opening, to P28, the peak of the critical period for rodent visual cortical plasticity. Upon direct stimulation of layer 4 (L4), activity spreads to L2/3 and to L5 at all ages. However, while from eye opening to the peak of the critical period, the amplitude and persistence of the voltage signal decrease, peak activation is reached more quickly and the interlaminar gain increases with age. The lateral spread of activation within layers remains unchanged throughout the time window under analysis. These developmental changes in spatio-temporal patterns of intracortical circuit activation are mediated by differences in the contributions of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic components. Our results demonstrate that after eye opening the circuit in V1 is refined through a progression of changes that shape the spatio-temporal patterns of circuit activation. Signals become more efficiently propagated across layers through developmentally regulated changes in interlaminar gain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Developmental decrease in the fast AMPA receptor component of circuit activation. (A) Top: Time course of the AMPA receptor component of the optical signals measured from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5 from 10 ms before stimulation to 50 ms after stimulation. The AMPA receptor component of the signal was obtained by subtracting the VSD signal remaining after DNQX from the signal measured in ACSF with APV. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Light gray line: 0.0 ΔF/F. Light gray dashes: TFS 0 ms and 20 ms. Bottom: Total ΔF/F of the AMPA receptor component of the optical signal for 20 ms from stimulation measured from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Error bars: ± SEM. Dark bars indicate significant changes, p < 0.05. (B) Top: Time course of the AMPA component of the optical signals from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5 from 10 ms before stimulation to 50 ms after stimulation normalized to the peak ΔF/F measured in each ROI before application of synaptic blockers. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Light gray line: 0.0 ΔF/F. Light gray dash: TFS 30 ms. Bottom: ΔF/F of the AMPA receptor component of the optical signal at 30 ms normalized to the peak ΔF/F before application of synaptic blockers measured from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Error bars: ± SEM.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539829&req=5

Figure 6: Developmental decrease in the fast AMPA receptor component of circuit activation. (A) Top: Time course of the AMPA receptor component of the optical signals measured from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5 from 10 ms before stimulation to 50 ms after stimulation. The AMPA receptor component of the signal was obtained by subtracting the VSD signal remaining after DNQX from the signal measured in ACSF with APV. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Light gray line: 0.0 ΔF/F. Light gray dashes: TFS 0 ms and 20 ms. Bottom: Total ΔF/F of the AMPA receptor component of the optical signal for 20 ms from stimulation measured from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Error bars: ± SEM. Dark bars indicate significant changes, p < 0.05. (B) Top: Time course of the AMPA component of the optical signals from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5 from 10 ms before stimulation to 50 ms after stimulation normalized to the peak ΔF/F measured in each ROI before application of synaptic blockers. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Light gray line: 0.0 ΔF/F. Light gray dash: TFS 30 ms. Bottom: ΔF/F of the AMPA receptor component of the optical signal at 30 ms normalized to the peak ΔF/F before application of synaptic blockers measured from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Error bars: ± SEM.

Mentions: Developmental reduction in cortical activation. (A) Representative sample VSD images at 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 30 ms from L4 stimulation for each age group. Images were cropped to better visualize the activated region (from 60 × 88 to 45 × 50 pixels, 20 μm per pixel). Top left panel: White boxes: ROIs quantified in panel (C), Figures 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7. Vertical white dashed line: ROI quantified in panel (B). Horizontal white dashed lines: ROIs quantified in Figure 4. (B) Time course of the ΔF/F measured by line scans perpendicular to the pial surface. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Error bars: ± SEM. (C) Top: Time course of optical signals measured from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5 from 10 ms before stimulation to 50 ms after stimulation on the left. The gray box indicates TFS 0 to 15 ms, which is shown amplified in the traces on the right to highlight changes in the time to peak. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Light gray line: 0.0 ΔF/F. Bottom: Peak ΔF/F measured from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Error bars: ± SEM. Dark bars indicate significant changes, p < 0.05.


Developmental regulation of spatio-temporal patterns of cortical circuit activation.

Griffen TC, Wang L, Fontanini A, Maffei A - Front Cell Neurosci (2013)

Developmental decrease in the fast AMPA receptor component of circuit activation. (A) Top: Time course of the AMPA receptor component of the optical signals measured from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5 from 10 ms before stimulation to 50 ms after stimulation. The AMPA receptor component of the signal was obtained by subtracting the VSD signal remaining after DNQX from the signal measured in ACSF with APV. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Light gray line: 0.0 ΔF/F. Light gray dashes: TFS 0 ms and 20 ms. Bottom: Total ΔF/F of the AMPA receptor component of the optical signal for 20 ms from stimulation measured from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Error bars: ± SEM. Dark bars indicate significant changes, p < 0.05. (B) Top: Time course of the AMPA component of the optical signals from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5 from 10 ms before stimulation to 50 ms after stimulation normalized to the peak ΔF/F measured in each ROI before application of synaptic blockers. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Light gray line: 0.0 ΔF/F. Light gray dash: TFS 30 ms. Bottom: ΔF/F of the AMPA receptor component of the optical signal at 30 ms normalized to the peak ΔF/F before application of synaptic blockers measured from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Error bars: ± SEM.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539829&req=5

Figure 6: Developmental decrease in the fast AMPA receptor component of circuit activation. (A) Top: Time course of the AMPA receptor component of the optical signals measured from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5 from 10 ms before stimulation to 50 ms after stimulation. The AMPA receptor component of the signal was obtained by subtracting the VSD signal remaining after DNQX from the signal measured in ACSF with APV. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Light gray line: 0.0 ΔF/F. Light gray dashes: TFS 0 ms and 20 ms. Bottom: Total ΔF/F of the AMPA receptor component of the optical signal for 20 ms from stimulation measured from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Error bars: ± SEM. Dark bars indicate significant changes, p < 0.05. (B) Top: Time course of the AMPA component of the optical signals from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5 from 10 ms before stimulation to 50 ms after stimulation normalized to the peak ΔF/F measured in each ROI before application of synaptic blockers. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Light gray line: 0.0 ΔF/F. Light gray dash: TFS 30 ms. Bottom: ΔF/F of the AMPA receptor component of the optical signal at 30 ms normalized to the peak ΔF/F before application of synaptic blockers measured from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Error bars: ± SEM.
Mentions: Developmental reduction in cortical activation. (A) Representative sample VSD images at 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 30 ms from L4 stimulation for each age group. Images were cropped to better visualize the activated region (from 60 × 88 to 45 × 50 pixels, 20 μm per pixel). Top left panel: White boxes: ROIs quantified in panel (C), Figures 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7. Vertical white dashed line: ROI quantified in panel (B). Horizontal white dashed lines: ROIs quantified in Figure 4. (B) Time course of the ΔF/F measured by line scans perpendicular to the pial surface. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Error bars: ± SEM. (C) Top: Time course of optical signals measured from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5 from 10 ms before stimulation to 50 ms after stimulation on the left. The gray box indicates TFS 0 to 15 ms, which is shown amplified in the traces on the right to highlight changes in the time to peak. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Light gray line: 0.0 ΔF/F. Bottom: Peak ΔF/F measured from ROIs in L4, L2/3, and L5. Blue: P14. Red: P20. Orange: P27. Error bars: ± SEM. Dark bars indicate significant changes, p < 0.05.

Bottom Line: However, while from eye opening to the peak of the critical period, the amplitude and persistence of the voltage signal decrease, peak activation is reached more quickly and the interlaminar gain increases with age.The lateral spread of activation within layers remains unchanged throughout the time window under analysis.Signals become more efficiently propagated across layers through developmentally regulated changes in interlaminar gain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Program in Neuroscience, Stony Brook University Stony Brook, NY, USA ; Medical Scientist Training Program, Stony Brook University Stony Brook, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Neural circuits are refined in an experience-dependent manner during early postnatal development. How development modulates the spatio-temporal propagation of activity through cortical circuits is poorly understood. Here we use voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSD) to show that there are significant changes in the spatio-temporal patterns of intracortical signals in primary visual cortex (V1) from postnatal day 13 (P13), eye opening, to P28, the peak of the critical period for rodent visual cortical plasticity. Upon direct stimulation of layer 4 (L4), activity spreads to L2/3 and to L5 at all ages. However, while from eye opening to the peak of the critical period, the amplitude and persistence of the voltage signal decrease, peak activation is reached more quickly and the interlaminar gain increases with age. The lateral spread of activation within layers remains unchanged throughout the time window under analysis. These developmental changes in spatio-temporal patterns of intracortical circuit activation are mediated by differences in the contributions of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic components. Our results demonstrate that after eye opening the circuit in V1 is refined through a progression of changes that shape the spatio-temporal patterns of circuit activation. Signals become more efficiently propagated across layers through developmentally regulated changes in interlaminar gain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus