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Real-time system for studies of the effects of acoustic feedback on animal vocalizations.

Skocik M, Kozhevnikov A - Front Neural Circuits (2013)

Bottom Line: We describe an apparatus for generating real-time acoustic feedback.It is low-cost and can be programmed for a variety of behavioral experiments requiring acoustic feedback or neural stimulation.We use the system to study the effects of acoustic feedback on birds' vocalizations and demonstrate that such an acoustic feedback can cause both immediate and long-term changes to birds' songs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University University Park, PA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Studies of behavioral and neural responses to distorted auditory feedback (DAF) can help shed light on the neural mechanisms of animal vocalizations. We describe an apparatus for generating real-time acoustic feedback. The system can very rapidly detect acoustic features in a song and output acoustic signals if the detected features match the desired acoustic template. The system uses spectrogram-based detection of acoustic elements. It is low-cost and can be programmed for a variety of behavioral experiments requiring acoustic feedback or neural stimulation. We use the system to study the effects of acoustic feedback on birds' vocalizations and demonstrate that such an acoustic feedback can cause both immediate and long-term changes to birds' songs.

No MeSH data available.


Top: spectrogram of the song of a Bengalese finch and the times of occurrence of one of the song syllables. The system was programmed to only detect the occurrences of the target syllable in real time, no acoustic feedback was generated. The detection times are shown as vertical red lines. Bottom: the system is detecting the target syllables (vertical red lines) and is generating acoustic feedback after detection. The acoustic feedback waveform is shown below. The feedback signal is one of the birdsong syllables; the acoustic feedback pickup by the microphone is visible on the spectrogram. The zoomed-in spectrogram of the template is shown on the right.
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Figure 2: Top: spectrogram of the song of a Bengalese finch and the times of occurrence of one of the song syllables. The system was programmed to only detect the occurrences of the target syllable in real time, no acoustic feedback was generated. The detection times are shown as vertical red lines. Bottom: the system is detecting the target syllables (vertical red lines) and is generating acoustic feedback after detection. The acoustic feedback waveform is shown below. The feedback signal is one of the birdsong syllables; the acoustic feedback pickup by the microphone is visible on the spectrogram. The zoomed-in spectrogram of the template is shown on the right.

Mentions: We tested the performance of the system for detection of specific syllables in the song of a Bengalese finch. The Bengalese finch song consists of a sequence of syllables separated by silences (inter-syllable gaps) (Figure 2). The acoustic structure of the song syllables is fairly stable; the main source of variability from one song to another is the sequence of syllables in each song (Honda and Okanoya, 1999).


Real-time system for studies of the effects of acoustic feedback on animal vocalizations.

Skocik M, Kozhevnikov A - Front Neural Circuits (2013)

Top: spectrogram of the song of a Bengalese finch and the times of occurrence of one of the song syllables. The system was programmed to only detect the occurrences of the target syllable in real time, no acoustic feedback was generated. The detection times are shown as vertical red lines. Bottom: the system is detecting the target syllables (vertical red lines) and is generating acoustic feedback after detection. The acoustic feedback waveform is shown below. The feedback signal is one of the birdsong syllables; the acoustic feedback pickup by the microphone is visible on the spectrogram. The zoomed-in spectrogram of the template is shown on the right.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539774&req=5

Figure 2: Top: spectrogram of the song of a Bengalese finch and the times of occurrence of one of the song syllables. The system was programmed to only detect the occurrences of the target syllable in real time, no acoustic feedback was generated. The detection times are shown as vertical red lines. Bottom: the system is detecting the target syllables (vertical red lines) and is generating acoustic feedback after detection. The acoustic feedback waveform is shown below. The feedback signal is one of the birdsong syllables; the acoustic feedback pickup by the microphone is visible on the spectrogram. The zoomed-in spectrogram of the template is shown on the right.
Mentions: We tested the performance of the system for detection of specific syllables in the song of a Bengalese finch. The Bengalese finch song consists of a sequence of syllables separated by silences (inter-syllable gaps) (Figure 2). The acoustic structure of the song syllables is fairly stable; the main source of variability from one song to another is the sequence of syllables in each song (Honda and Okanoya, 1999).

Bottom Line: We describe an apparatus for generating real-time acoustic feedback.It is low-cost and can be programmed for a variety of behavioral experiments requiring acoustic feedback or neural stimulation.We use the system to study the effects of acoustic feedback on birds' vocalizations and demonstrate that such an acoustic feedback can cause both immediate and long-term changes to birds' songs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University University Park, PA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Studies of behavioral and neural responses to distorted auditory feedback (DAF) can help shed light on the neural mechanisms of animal vocalizations. We describe an apparatus for generating real-time acoustic feedback. The system can very rapidly detect acoustic features in a song and output acoustic signals if the detected features match the desired acoustic template. The system uses spectrogram-based detection of acoustic elements. It is low-cost and can be programmed for a variety of behavioral experiments requiring acoustic feedback or neural stimulation. We use the system to study the effects of acoustic feedback on birds' vocalizations and demonstrate that such an acoustic feedback can cause both immediate and long-term changes to birds' songs.

No MeSH data available.