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Anxiolytic effects of flavonoids in animal models of posttraumatic stress disorder.

Zhang LM, Yao JZ, Li Y, Li K, Chen HX, Zhang YZ, Li YF - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2012)

Bottom Line: To date, SSRIs have already been established as the firstline pharmacotherapeutic agents for treating acute and chronic PTSD.However, SSRIs largely have several disadvantages which limit their utility.Therefore, the present study aims to examine the effect of flavonoids in alleviating the enhanced anxiety and fear response induced in two PTSD animal models.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of New Drug Evaluation, Beijing Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Beijing 100850, China.

ABSTRACT
The dysregulation of the serotonergic system has long been recognized as an important factor underlying the pathophysiology of PTSD. To date, SSRIs have already been established as the firstline pharmacotherapeutic agents for treating acute and chronic PTSD. However, SSRIs largely have several disadvantages which limit their utility. Our previous study has also shown that administration of the total flavonoids, isolated from the extract of Xiaobuxin-Tang (XBXT, mild mind-easing decoction), comprising four Chinese medicines including Haematitum, Flos Inulae, Folium Phyllostachydis Henonis, and Semen Sojae Preparatum, exerted significant antidepressant-like effect in chronically mildly stressed rats, possibly mediated by serotonergic activation. Since the central serotonergic dysfunction is an important and well-known cause mediating the pathophysiology of trauma-related symptoms in PTSD, it is reasonable to predict that flavonoids may exert therapeutic effects on PTSD in animal models. Therefore, the present study aims to examine the effect of flavonoids in alleviating the enhanced anxiety and fear response induced in two PTSD animal models. Ser, an SSRI, was administered as a positive control. Furthermore, the changes of brain monoaminergic neurotransmitters after chronic flavonoids administration have also been assessed in SPS-treated rats.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The effects of repeated treatment with Ser or flavonoids on the behavior of mice in the staircase test. (a) number of rearings and (b) number of steps climbed by mice during a 3-min period. Data are presented as mean ± SEM (n = 10). *P < 0.05 compared with foot-shocks. (−) group; #P < 0.05, ##P < 0.01 compared with saline-treated foot-shocks (+) group (ANOVA followed by Dunnett's t-test).
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fig2: The effects of repeated treatment with Ser or flavonoids on the behavior of mice in the staircase test. (a) number of rearings and (b) number of steps climbed by mice during a 3-min period. Data are presented as mean ± SEM (n = 10). *P < 0.05 compared with foot-shocks. (−) group; #P < 0.05, ##P < 0.01 compared with saline-treated foot-shocks (+) group (ANOVA followed by Dunnett's t-test).

Mentions: In the staircase test, mice that had been previously exposed to foot shocks and situational reminders exhibited an increased number of rearings (F[5, 54] = 5.163, P < 0.05) but failed to demonstrate a significant change in number of steps (F[5, 54] = 0.5102, P > 0.05). These results indicate that the animals still avoided the aversive-like compartment and that they exhibited a fear response to the context associating with traumatic events. ANOVA showed that repeated administrations of flavonoids (25 and 50 mg/kg, P < 0.01) or Ser (15 mg/kg, P < 0.01) significantly improved the behavioral deficits induced by the aversive procedures (Figure 2).


Anxiolytic effects of flavonoids in animal models of posttraumatic stress disorder.

Zhang LM, Yao JZ, Li Y, Li K, Chen HX, Zhang YZ, Li YF - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2012)

The effects of repeated treatment with Ser or flavonoids on the behavior of mice in the staircase test. (a) number of rearings and (b) number of steps climbed by mice during a 3-min period. Data are presented as mean ± SEM (n = 10). *P < 0.05 compared with foot-shocks. (−) group; #P < 0.05, ##P < 0.01 compared with saline-treated foot-shocks (+) group (ANOVA followed by Dunnett's t-test).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539772&req=5

fig2: The effects of repeated treatment with Ser or flavonoids on the behavior of mice in the staircase test. (a) number of rearings and (b) number of steps climbed by mice during a 3-min period. Data are presented as mean ± SEM (n = 10). *P < 0.05 compared with foot-shocks. (−) group; #P < 0.05, ##P < 0.01 compared with saline-treated foot-shocks (+) group (ANOVA followed by Dunnett's t-test).
Mentions: In the staircase test, mice that had been previously exposed to foot shocks and situational reminders exhibited an increased number of rearings (F[5, 54] = 5.163, P < 0.05) but failed to demonstrate a significant change in number of steps (F[5, 54] = 0.5102, P > 0.05). These results indicate that the animals still avoided the aversive-like compartment and that they exhibited a fear response to the context associating with traumatic events. ANOVA showed that repeated administrations of flavonoids (25 and 50 mg/kg, P < 0.01) or Ser (15 mg/kg, P < 0.01) significantly improved the behavioral deficits induced by the aversive procedures (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: To date, SSRIs have already been established as the firstline pharmacotherapeutic agents for treating acute and chronic PTSD.However, SSRIs largely have several disadvantages which limit their utility.Therefore, the present study aims to examine the effect of flavonoids in alleviating the enhanced anxiety and fear response induced in two PTSD animal models.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of New Drug Evaluation, Beijing Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Beijing 100850, China.

ABSTRACT
The dysregulation of the serotonergic system has long been recognized as an important factor underlying the pathophysiology of PTSD. To date, SSRIs have already been established as the firstline pharmacotherapeutic agents for treating acute and chronic PTSD. However, SSRIs largely have several disadvantages which limit their utility. Our previous study has also shown that administration of the total flavonoids, isolated from the extract of Xiaobuxin-Tang (XBXT, mild mind-easing decoction), comprising four Chinese medicines including Haematitum, Flos Inulae, Folium Phyllostachydis Henonis, and Semen Sojae Preparatum, exerted significant antidepressant-like effect in chronically mildly stressed rats, possibly mediated by serotonergic activation. Since the central serotonergic dysfunction is an important and well-known cause mediating the pathophysiology of trauma-related symptoms in PTSD, it is reasonable to predict that flavonoids may exert therapeutic effects on PTSD in animal models. Therefore, the present study aims to examine the effect of flavonoids in alleviating the enhanced anxiety and fear response induced in two PTSD animal models. Ser, an SSRI, was administered as a positive control. Furthermore, the changes of brain monoaminergic neurotransmitters after chronic flavonoids administration have also been assessed in SPS-treated rats.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus