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Assessment of sleep patterns, energy expenditure and circadian rhythms of skin temperature in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

Al Otair H, Al-Shamiri M, Bahobail M, Sharif MM, BaHammam AS - Med. Sci. Monit. (2011)

Bottom Line: Patients in the CCU had a reduced night's sleep duration (5.6 ± 2.2 hr) with more frequent and significantly shorter night sessions (p=0.015) than patients in the ward.However, the midline-estimating statistic of rhythm (MESOR) and acrophase for skin temperature did not exhibit any significant difference between the two settings.Patients with ACS have sleep fragmentation and shorter nocturnal sleep duration in the CCU compared to the ward.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Critical Care, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is no simple and practical way to monitor sleep patterns in patients in acute care units. We designed this study to assess sleep patterns, energy expenditure and circadian rhythms of patients' skin temperature in the coronary care unit (CCU) utilizing a new portable device.

Material/methods: The SenseWear Armband (SWA) was used to record sleep duration, distribution over 24 hr, energy expenditure and the circadian rhythms of skin temperature in 46 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) for the first 24 hr in the CCU and upon transfer to the ward. An advanced analysis was used to extract and compare data associated with the above variables in the two settings.

Results: Patients in the CCU had a reduced night's sleep duration (5.6 ± 2.2 hr) with more frequent and significantly shorter night sessions (p=0.015) than patients in the ward. Energy expenditure and METs (metabolic equivalents of a task) were significantly lower in the CCU than in the ward. However, the midline-estimating statistic of rhythm (MESOR) and acrophase for skin temperature did not exhibit any significant difference between the two settings.

Conclusions: Patients with ACS have sleep fragmentation and shorter nocturnal sleep duration in the CCU compared to the ward. On the other hand, there was no difference in the circadian rhythms of skin temperature between patients in the CCU and the general wards.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of sleep over the first 24 hr in the CCU (A) and the general ward (B).
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f1-medscimonit-17-7-cr397: Distribution of sleep over the first 24 hr in the CCU (A) and the general ward (B).

Mentions: Follow-up monitoring was done for 28 of the 46 patients (21 males) after transfer to the general ward because the remaining 18 were discharged from the CCU directly to home after 72 hours. Table 2 shows a comparison between sleep characteristics and energy expenditure for these 28 patients in the CCU and the general wards. There was no significant difference between nighttime sleep in the CCU and the wards (5.6±2.2 h and 6.2±2.0 h, respectively). Similarly, no significant difference was found in the time spent in naps. However, nighttime sleep sessions were more frequent and shorter in the CCU than in the ward (2.4 h vs. 3.5 h P=0.015). The energy expenditure and METs were significantly less in the CCU than in the wards. Skin and near body temperature were significantly lower in the CCU than in the wards. Table 3 shows the MESOR and acrophase of skin temperature and energy expenditure in the CCU and in the wards. The MESOR for skin temperature was 32.79°C and 33.06°C in the CCU and the wards, respectively. The acrophase for skin temperature in CCU was at 13.3±9.5 h, and it did not differ significantly from that in the ward at 10.6±9.6 hours. The distribution of sleep over 24 hours (Figure 1) demonstrates that most sleep sessions took place during the night in both the CCU (Figure 1A) and the general ward (Figure 1B). On the other hand, the MESOR and the amplitude of energy expenditure were significantly lower in the CCU than in the general ward.


Assessment of sleep patterns, energy expenditure and circadian rhythms of skin temperature in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

Al Otair H, Al-Shamiri M, Bahobail M, Sharif MM, BaHammam AS - Med. Sci. Monit. (2011)

Distribution of sleep over the first 24 hr in the CCU (A) and the general ward (B).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539555&req=5

f1-medscimonit-17-7-cr397: Distribution of sleep over the first 24 hr in the CCU (A) and the general ward (B).
Mentions: Follow-up monitoring was done for 28 of the 46 patients (21 males) after transfer to the general ward because the remaining 18 were discharged from the CCU directly to home after 72 hours. Table 2 shows a comparison between sleep characteristics and energy expenditure for these 28 patients in the CCU and the general wards. There was no significant difference between nighttime sleep in the CCU and the wards (5.6±2.2 h and 6.2±2.0 h, respectively). Similarly, no significant difference was found in the time spent in naps. However, nighttime sleep sessions were more frequent and shorter in the CCU than in the ward (2.4 h vs. 3.5 h P=0.015). The energy expenditure and METs were significantly less in the CCU than in the wards. Skin and near body temperature were significantly lower in the CCU than in the wards. Table 3 shows the MESOR and acrophase of skin temperature and energy expenditure in the CCU and in the wards. The MESOR for skin temperature was 32.79°C and 33.06°C in the CCU and the wards, respectively. The acrophase for skin temperature in CCU was at 13.3±9.5 h, and it did not differ significantly from that in the ward at 10.6±9.6 hours. The distribution of sleep over 24 hours (Figure 1) demonstrates that most sleep sessions took place during the night in both the CCU (Figure 1A) and the general ward (Figure 1B). On the other hand, the MESOR and the amplitude of energy expenditure were significantly lower in the CCU than in the general ward.

Bottom Line: Patients in the CCU had a reduced night's sleep duration (5.6 ± 2.2 hr) with more frequent and significantly shorter night sessions (p=0.015) than patients in the ward.However, the midline-estimating statistic of rhythm (MESOR) and acrophase for skin temperature did not exhibit any significant difference between the two settings.Patients with ACS have sleep fragmentation and shorter nocturnal sleep duration in the CCU compared to the ward.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Critical Care, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is no simple and practical way to monitor sleep patterns in patients in acute care units. We designed this study to assess sleep patterns, energy expenditure and circadian rhythms of patients' skin temperature in the coronary care unit (CCU) utilizing a new portable device.

Material/methods: The SenseWear Armband (SWA) was used to record sleep duration, distribution over 24 hr, energy expenditure and the circadian rhythms of skin temperature in 46 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) for the first 24 hr in the CCU and upon transfer to the ward. An advanced analysis was used to extract and compare data associated with the above variables in the two settings.

Results: Patients in the CCU had a reduced night's sleep duration (5.6 ± 2.2 hr) with more frequent and significantly shorter night sessions (p=0.015) than patients in the ward. Energy expenditure and METs (metabolic equivalents of a task) were significantly lower in the CCU than in the ward. However, the midline-estimating statistic of rhythm (MESOR) and acrophase for skin temperature did not exhibit any significant difference between the two settings.

Conclusions: Patients with ACS have sleep fragmentation and shorter nocturnal sleep duration in the CCU compared to the ward. On the other hand, there was no difference in the circadian rhythms of skin temperature between patients in the CCU and the general wards.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus