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High-frequency electrical stimulation in the nucleus accumbens of morphine-treated rats suppresses neuronal firing in reward-related brain regions.

Hu WH, Bi YF, Zhang K, Meng FG, Zhang JG - Med. Sci. Monit. (2011)

Bottom Line: Conditioned place preference (CPP) behavior of the rats was evaluated to confirm morphine preference after morphine injection and CPP training for 10 days.The results suggest that electrical stimulation in the NAc can suppress neuronal firing in reward-related brain regions.The core and shell of the NAc play different roles in suppressing NAc neuronal firing as 2 stimulating targets.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous studies have reported that high-frequency stimulation (HFS) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is a potential treatment modality for drug craving and relapse. We aimed to explore the electrophysiological changes in reward-related brain regions during NAc stimulation and reveal the effects of stimulation frequency and target changes on NAc neuronal activities.

Material/methods: Twenty-eight rats were randomized into saline (n=8) and morphine (n=20) groups. The morphine group was further divided into core (n=10, only the core of the NAc was stimulated) and shell (n=10, only the shell of the NAc was stimulated) subgroups. Conditioned place preference (CPP) behavior of the rats was evaluated to confirm morphine preference after morphine injection and CPP training for 10 days. We recorded NAc neuronal responses to NAc core stimulation at different frequencies, as well as changes in VP and VTA neuronal firing during NAc core stimulation, and changes in NAc neuronal firing during NAc shell stimulation.

Results: The results indicate that high frequency stimulation was more effective in suppressing NAc neuronal activities than low frequency stimulation and that core stimulation was more effective than shell stimulation. Most VP neurons were inhibited by NAc core stimulation, while VTA neurons were not.

Conclusions: The results suggest that electrical stimulation in the NAc can suppress neuronal firing in reward-related brain regions. The stimulation might be frequency- dependent in suppressing neuronal firing. The core and shell of the NAc play different roles in suppressing NAc neuronal firing as 2 stimulating targets.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of the CPP scores between the saline group and morphine group in the pretest and test phase. Data was mean ±SEM, * stood for P<0.05, Independent-Sample t test
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f3-medscimonit-17-6-br153: Comparison of the CPP scores between the saline group and morphine group in the pretest and test phase. Data was mean ±SEM, * stood for P<0.05, Independent-Sample t test

Mentions: The withdrawal syndrome had disappeared on day 17, and all rats with morphine administration showed preference to the drug-paired side (ie, spent more than 540 seconds in the drug-paired chamber), confirming the successful establishment of morphine preference (Independent-Sample t test: t(26)= −21.59, P<0.0001) (Figure 3).


High-frequency electrical stimulation in the nucleus accumbens of morphine-treated rats suppresses neuronal firing in reward-related brain regions.

Hu WH, Bi YF, Zhang K, Meng FG, Zhang JG - Med. Sci. Monit. (2011)

Comparison of the CPP scores between the saline group and morphine group in the pretest and test phase. Data was mean ±SEM, * stood for P<0.05, Independent-Sample t test
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539543&req=5

f3-medscimonit-17-6-br153: Comparison of the CPP scores between the saline group and morphine group in the pretest and test phase. Data was mean ±SEM, * stood for P<0.05, Independent-Sample t test
Mentions: The withdrawal syndrome had disappeared on day 17, and all rats with morphine administration showed preference to the drug-paired side (ie, spent more than 540 seconds in the drug-paired chamber), confirming the successful establishment of morphine preference (Independent-Sample t test: t(26)= −21.59, P<0.0001) (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Conditioned place preference (CPP) behavior of the rats was evaluated to confirm morphine preference after morphine injection and CPP training for 10 days.The results suggest that electrical stimulation in the NAc can suppress neuronal firing in reward-related brain regions.The core and shell of the NAc play different roles in suppressing NAc neuronal firing as 2 stimulating targets.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous studies have reported that high-frequency stimulation (HFS) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is a potential treatment modality for drug craving and relapse. We aimed to explore the electrophysiological changes in reward-related brain regions during NAc stimulation and reveal the effects of stimulation frequency and target changes on NAc neuronal activities.

Material/methods: Twenty-eight rats were randomized into saline (n=8) and morphine (n=20) groups. The morphine group was further divided into core (n=10, only the core of the NAc was stimulated) and shell (n=10, only the shell of the NAc was stimulated) subgroups. Conditioned place preference (CPP) behavior of the rats was evaluated to confirm morphine preference after morphine injection and CPP training for 10 days. We recorded NAc neuronal responses to NAc core stimulation at different frequencies, as well as changes in VP and VTA neuronal firing during NAc core stimulation, and changes in NAc neuronal firing during NAc shell stimulation.

Results: The results indicate that high frequency stimulation was more effective in suppressing NAc neuronal activities than low frequency stimulation and that core stimulation was more effective than shell stimulation. Most VP neurons were inhibited by NAc core stimulation, while VTA neurons were not.

Conclusions: The results suggest that electrical stimulation in the NAc can suppress neuronal firing in reward-related brain regions. The stimulation might be frequency- dependent in suppressing neuronal firing. The core and shell of the NAc play different roles in suppressing NAc neuronal firing as 2 stimulating targets.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus