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The impact of capsulorhexis diameter, localization and shape on posterior capsule opacification.

Langwińska-Wośko E, Broniek-Kowalik K, Szulborski K - Med. Sci. Monit. (2011)

Bottom Line: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of capsulorhexis diameter, localization and shape on posterior capsule opacification (PCO) development after cataract extraction with phacoemulsification.We retrospectively analyzed of 297 patients who underwent phacoemulsification and AcrySof SA60AT implantation.A small capsulorhexis diameter, its central localization and regular shape result in less PCO following phacoemulsification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, 2nd Medical Faculty, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of capsulorhexis diameter, localization and shape on posterior capsule opacification (PCO) development after cataract extraction with phacoemulsification.

Material/methods: We retrospectively analyzed of 297 patients who underwent phacoemulsification and AcrySof SA60AT implantation. In a first group of 97 patients, 53 received small capsulorhexis (3.9 to 4.9 mm in diameter) and 44 patients received large capsulorhexis (5.0 to 5.9 mm in diameter). Another group of 99 patients was split into subgroups--66 patients whose capsulorhexis were centrally located and 33 patients whose capsulorhexis were paracentral. A third group of 101 patients was split into subgroups--a subgroup of 59 patients were classified as having a regularly rimmed capsulorhexis and a subgroup of 42 patients as having an irregularly rimmed capsulorhexis. At 6 months follow-up, PCO was classified as none, mild, moderate, or severe, depending on the number of quadrants involved.

Results: 86.79% of the patients with a small capsulorhexis had no or mild PCO (p<0.001), whereas, 68.18% of the patients with a large capsulorhexis experienced moderate or severe PCO; 89.4% of the patients with a central capsulorhexis had no or mild PCO (p<0.001), whereas, 75.75% of the patients with a paracentral capsulorhexis had moderate or severe PCO; 86.44% of the patients with a regularly rimmed anterior capsulorhexis had no or mild PCO (p<0.001); and 69.04% of the patients with an irregular capsulorhexis rim had moderate or severe PCO.

Conclusions: A small capsulorhexis diameter, its central localization and regular shape result in less PCO following phacoemulsification.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Patients demographics (N=297).
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f1-medscimonit-17-10-cr577: Patients demographics (N=297).

Mentions: The mean age was 66 years (range: 45 to 87 years) (Figure 1); 188 of the patients were female and 109 were male. There were no significant differences in age and sex distribution between the groups.


The impact of capsulorhexis diameter, localization and shape on posterior capsule opacification.

Langwińska-Wośko E, Broniek-Kowalik K, Szulborski K - Med. Sci. Monit. (2011)

Patients demographics (N=297).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539474&req=5

f1-medscimonit-17-10-cr577: Patients demographics (N=297).
Mentions: The mean age was 66 years (range: 45 to 87 years) (Figure 1); 188 of the patients were female and 109 were male. There were no significant differences in age and sex distribution between the groups.

Bottom Line: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of capsulorhexis diameter, localization and shape on posterior capsule opacification (PCO) development after cataract extraction with phacoemulsification.We retrospectively analyzed of 297 patients who underwent phacoemulsification and AcrySof SA60AT implantation.A small capsulorhexis diameter, its central localization and regular shape result in less PCO following phacoemulsification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, 2nd Medical Faculty, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of capsulorhexis diameter, localization and shape on posterior capsule opacification (PCO) development after cataract extraction with phacoemulsification.

Material/methods: We retrospectively analyzed of 297 patients who underwent phacoemulsification and AcrySof SA60AT implantation. In a first group of 97 patients, 53 received small capsulorhexis (3.9 to 4.9 mm in diameter) and 44 patients received large capsulorhexis (5.0 to 5.9 mm in diameter). Another group of 99 patients was split into subgroups--66 patients whose capsulorhexis were centrally located and 33 patients whose capsulorhexis were paracentral. A third group of 101 patients was split into subgroups--a subgroup of 59 patients were classified as having a regularly rimmed capsulorhexis and a subgroup of 42 patients as having an irregularly rimmed capsulorhexis. At 6 months follow-up, PCO was classified as none, mild, moderate, or severe, depending on the number of quadrants involved.

Results: 86.79% of the patients with a small capsulorhexis had no or mild PCO (p<0.001), whereas, 68.18% of the patients with a large capsulorhexis experienced moderate or severe PCO; 89.4% of the patients with a central capsulorhexis had no or mild PCO (p<0.001), whereas, 75.75% of the patients with a paracentral capsulorhexis had moderate or severe PCO; 86.44% of the patients with a regularly rimmed anterior capsulorhexis had no or mild PCO (p<0.001); and 69.04% of the patients with an irregular capsulorhexis rim had moderate or severe PCO.

Conclusions: A small capsulorhexis diameter, its central localization and regular shape result in less PCO following phacoemulsification.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus