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Involvement of the lymphatic system in salt-sensitive hypertension in humans.

Liu F, Mu J, Yuan Z, Lian Q, Zheng S, Wu G, Liu E - Med. Sci. Monit. (2011)

Bottom Line: High salt intake significantly increased the plasma VEGF-C level.The comparison of VEGF-C levels between the 2 groups had significant statistical difference (P<0.01).The VEGF-C level increases significantly in the salt-sensitive subjects after high salt intake.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiovascular Department, 1st Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, PR China.

ABSTRACT

Background: The mechanisms of salt sensitivity as an important intermediate phenotype of essential hypertension remain elusive. A novel theory proposes that lymphatic vessels regulate sodium and fluid homeostasis. Since vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C) plays a vital role in lymphatic capillary hyperplasia, we hypothesized that VEGF-C was involved in salt-sensitive hypertension. We therefore investigated its plasma concentration in salt-sensitive subjects.

Material/methods: Twenty-seven subjects (BP ≤ 160/100 mmHg; age range 25-50 years) from a rural community of northern China were enrolled in this study. The baseline BP of volunteers was monitored for 3 days, followed by a low-salt diet for 7 days (3 g/day, NaCl) and a high-salt diet for 7 days (18 g/day, NaCl). Those who exhibited a BP increase of 10% from low-salt period to high-salt period were diagnosed as salt-sensitive subjects. The concentration of plasma VEGF-C was measured by an immunoenzyme method (ELISA).

Result: High salt intake significantly increased the plasma VEGF-C level. It was higher in the salt-sensitive subjects (3642.2 ± 406.1 pg/ml) than in the salt-resistant subjects (2249.8 ± 214.6 pg/ml). The comparison of VEGF-C levels between the 2 groups had significant statistical difference (P<0.01).

Conclusions: The VEGF-C level increases significantly in the salt-sensitive subjects after high salt intake. VEGF-C could be used as a biomarker of salt sensitivity.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Influence of salt loading on BP and sodium excretion by urine. ** P<0.01 vs. low salt diet
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f2-medscimonit-17-10-cr542: Influence of salt loading on BP and sodium excretion by urine. ** P<0.01 vs. low salt diet

Mentions: In order to observe the influence of salt intake on urinary sodium excretions, the total volume of sodium in the urine was calculated at the end of each diet period. Sodium level was remarkably higher during the high-salt diet than during the low-salt diet; however, there was no significant difference between the salt-sensitive subjects and the salt-resistant subjects (Figure 2).


Involvement of the lymphatic system in salt-sensitive hypertension in humans.

Liu F, Mu J, Yuan Z, Lian Q, Zheng S, Wu G, Liu E - Med. Sci. Monit. (2011)

Influence of salt loading on BP and sodium excretion by urine. ** P<0.01 vs. low salt diet
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539464&req=5

f2-medscimonit-17-10-cr542: Influence of salt loading on BP and sodium excretion by urine. ** P<0.01 vs. low salt diet
Mentions: In order to observe the influence of salt intake on urinary sodium excretions, the total volume of sodium in the urine was calculated at the end of each diet period. Sodium level was remarkably higher during the high-salt diet than during the low-salt diet; however, there was no significant difference between the salt-sensitive subjects and the salt-resistant subjects (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: High salt intake significantly increased the plasma VEGF-C level.The comparison of VEGF-C levels between the 2 groups had significant statistical difference (P<0.01).The VEGF-C level increases significantly in the salt-sensitive subjects after high salt intake.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiovascular Department, 1st Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, PR China.

ABSTRACT

Background: The mechanisms of salt sensitivity as an important intermediate phenotype of essential hypertension remain elusive. A novel theory proposes that lymphatic vessels regulate sodium and fluid homeostasis. Since vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C) plays a vital role in lymphatic capillary hyperplasia, we hypothesized that VEGF-C was involved in salt-sensitive hypertension. We therefore investigated its plasma concentration in salt-sensitive subjects.

Material/methods: Twenty-seven subjects (BP ≤ 160/100 mmHg; age range 25-50 years) from a rural community of northern China were enrolled in this study. The baseline BP of volunteers was monitored for 3 days, followed by a low-salt diet for 7 days (3 g/day, NaCl) and a high-salt diet for 7 days (18 g/day, NaCl). Those who exhibited a BP increase of 10% from low-salt period to high-salt period were diagnosed as salt-sensitive subjects. The concentration of plasma VEGF-C was measured by an immunoenzyme method (ELISA).

Result: High salt intake significantly increased the plasma VEGF-C level. It was higher in the salt-sensitive subjects (3642.2 ± 406.1 pg/ml) than in the salt-resistant subjects (2249.8 ± 214.6 pg/ml). The comparison of VEGF-C levels between the 2 groups had significant statistical difference (P<0.01).

Conclusions: The VEGF-C level increases significantly in the salt-sensitive subjects after high salt intake. VEGF-C could be used as a biomarker of salt sensitivity.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus